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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Meyers, Marcia K.; Brady, Henry E.; Seto, Eva Y.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    This study uses survey and administrative data collected in the mid-1990s in the State of California to examine the public and private costs associated with children in families at the intersection of two populations: those served by public welfare programs and those caring for disabled children. We consider direct private costs for families, in the form of out-of-pocket expenditures for disability-related goods or services, and the indirect private costs of forgone employment income. We consider public costs by examining rates and duration of participation in means-tested cash assistance programs. We conclude that poor parents with disabled children often face dismaying tradeoffs between meeting the special needs of their children or meeting the basic needs of their families, and between working or caring for their children. Assistance provided through public programs, particularly Medicaid or Supplemental Security Income (SSI), may reduce these tradeoffs and resulting compromises in families’ well-being. (author abstract)

    This study uses survey and administrative data collected in the mid-1990s in the State of California to examine the public and private costs associated with children in families at the intersection of two populations: those served by public welfare programs and those caring for disabled children. We consider direct private costs for families, in the form of out-of-pocket expenditures for disability-related goods or services, and the indirect private costs of forgone employment income. We consider public costs by examining rates and duration of participation in means-tested cash assistance programs. We conclude that poor parents with disabled children often face dismaying tradeoffs between meeting the special needs of their children or meeting the basic needs of their families, and between working or caring for their children. Assistance provided through public programs, particularly Medicaid or Supplemental Security Income (SSI), may reduce these tradeoffs and resulting compromises in families’ well-being. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: The Lewin Group, Inc.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    This report summarizes the findings from information collected during three sets of focus groups conducted for a study on employment supports for people with disabilities sponsored by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The study is intended to increase the understanding of the role of various supports in helping people with disabilities find and maintain employment.

    The findings in this report are from focus groups conducted with 284 participants with significant disabilities, all of whom had obtained a measure of employment success, in Los Angeles, California; Newark, New Jersey; and Seattle/Tacoma, Washington, between April and December 2000. The focus groups were conducted between April and December 2000. All participants were 18 years old or older, had a significant disability with onset prior to first substantial employment, and had annual earnings of at least $8,240 before taxes and transfers. At the time of the focus groups, the latter was the federal poverty line for a...

    This report summarizes the findings from information collected during three sets of focus groups conducted for a study on employment supports for people with disabilities sponsored by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The study is intended to increase the understanding of the role of various supports in helping people with disabilities find and maintain employment.

    The findings in this report are from focus groups conducted with 284 participants with significant disabilities, all of whom had obtained a measure of employment success, in Los Angeles, California; Newark, New Jersey; and Seattle/Tacoma, Washington, between April and December 2000. The focus groups were conducted between April and December 2000. All participants were 18 years old or older, had a significant disability with onset prior to first substantial employment, and had annual earnings of at least $8,240 before taxes and transfers. At the time of the focus groups, the latter was the federal poverty line for a family of one.1 It is approximately equivalent to working 30 hours a week at the federal minimum wage. Basic socio-demographic, disability, and employment information was collected via a telephone screening instrument and a pre-focus group registration form.

    A slight majority of participants were male, and their average age was 38 at the time of interview. Just over half (55 percent) had experienced disability onset before age 13. Just over half were single, 61 percent were white, 16 percent were African-American, and 13 percent were of Hispanic ethnicity. While all had substantial earnings, 23 percent had annual earnings below $10,000. Median earnings were under $20,000. Only 7 percent had earnings above $50,000. Many lived in households with other income; median household income was about $40,000. The largest impairment category was mental illness (30 percent), followed by communication (21 percent) and mobility (19 percent) impairments.

    Prior to each focus group session, participants were asked to rank on a scale of 1 (very important) to 5 (not important) the importance of various supports in helping them find and maintain employment. About 75 percent (or more) of participants assigned a rank of 1 or 2 to each of five supports (listed in descending order): family encouragement; access to health insurance; skills development and training; college; and employer accommodations. Job coach services, personal assistance services (PAS) and special education ranked lowest, with more than 45 percent of participants assigning a rank of 4 or 5 to these supports.

    We asked focus group participants to discuss supports that were important to them at three critical periods of their lives: during childhood or at disability onset; obtaining first employment or first employment after disability onset; and in maintaining current employment. We present the findings from these focus groups below. Because we found that the supports used to obtain first employment and those used to maintain current employment were very similar, we have combined the discussion of these topics into one section. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Timmons, Jaimie Ciulla; Foley, Susan; Whitney-Thomas, Jean; Green, Joseph
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2001

    Welfare reform has changed the landscape of social protection for individuals on the margins of economic independence. Reforms require individuals to develop marketable skills and acceptable work behaviors and to move along a path to employment. For individuals with disabilities in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) system, substantial barriers and insufficient transitional supports can impede this path. The current study examined the impact of welfare reform on individuals with disabilities in the TANF system. This report summarizes the experiences of eleven individuals with disabilities receiving welfare benefits in Massachusetts and Wisconsin. Study findings trace a path from welfare to work, describe variations along this path for individuals with disabilities, and consider a range of supports necessary to address barriers. Implications for policy and practice are offered. (author abstract)

    Welfare reform has changed the landscape of social protection for individuals on the margins of economic independence. Reforms require individuals to develop marketable skills and acceptable work behaviors and to move along a path to employment. For individuals with disabilities in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) system, substantial barriers and insufficient transitional supports can impede this path. The current study examined the impact of welfare reform on individuals with disabilities in the TANF system. This report summarizes the experiences of eleven individuals with disabilities receiving welfare benefits in Massachusetts and Wisconsin. Study findings trace a path from welfare to work, describe variations along this path for individuals with disabilities, and consider a range of supports necessary to address barriers. Implications for policy and practice are offered. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Foley, Susan M.; Marrone, Joseph; Simon, Mia
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2002

    Women with disabilities have low employment rates and about one-third live in poverty. They represent half of the population using either services of the vocational rehabilitation (VR) system or the welfare system, and many use both. Although both systems have made gains in improving their employment status, neither comprehensively addresses the needs of this population. Welfare policy has encouraged state level innovation and moved large numbers of people into employment in as little as five years. State welfare agencies offer a range of services specifically addressing the needs of families with children. VR agencies have decades of specific experience assisting people with disabilities gain employment. Welfare reform has been the cruise ship moving large numbers of people across an ocean. VR agencies have been the kayak builders designing specialized small craft to move specific people along tributaries. What can they learn from each other? (author abstract)

    Women with disabilities have low employment rates and about one-third live in poverty. They represent half of the population using either services of the vocational rehabilitation (VR) system or the welfare system, and many use both. Although both systems have made gains in improving their employment status, neither comprehensively addresses the needs of this population. Welfare policy has encouraged state level innovation and moved large numbers of people into employment in as little as five years. State welfare agencies offer a range of services specifically addressing the needs of families with children. VR agencies have decades of specific experience assisting people with disabilities gain employment. Welfare reform has been the cruise ship moving large numbers of people across an ocean. VR agencies have been the kayak builders designing specialized small craft to move specific people along tributaries. What can they learn from each other? (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Holcomb, Pamela A.; Barnow, Burt S.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2004

    The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 is designed to provide a streamlined system of assistance that integrates many employment and training programs through a One-Stop delivery system for employers and job seekers, including job seekers with disabilities. There are currently over 3,000 One-Stop Career Centers operating across the country. Like the Ticket to Work (TtW) program, the One-Stop system offers the promise for a new source of employment assistance to people with disabilities, including the potential for One-Stops to serve in the capacity of approved "Employment Network" (EN) providers under the TtW program.

    This paper examines the extent to which people with disabilities are served through WIA's One-Stop system and discusses its capacity to serve people with disabilities who desire employment assistance, both in terms of common barriers to access as well as promising strategies to improve service delivery to people with disabilities. (Author Abstract)

    The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 is designed to provide a streamlined system of assistance that integrates many employment and training programs through a One-Stop delivery system for employers and job seekers, including job seekers with disabilities. There are currently over 3,000 One-Stop Career Centers operating across the country. Like the Ticket to Work (TtW) program, the One-Stop system offers the promise for a new source of employment assistance to people with disabilities, including the potential for One-Stops to serve in the capacity of approved "Employment Network" (EN) providers under the TtW program.

    This paper examines the extent to which people with disabilities are served through WIA's One-Stop system and discusses its capacity to serve people with disabilities who desire employment assistance, both in terms of common barriers to access as well as promising strategies to improve service delivery to people with disabilities. (Author Abstract)

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