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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Wilson, William Julius
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1997

    Wilson, one of our foremost authorities on race and poverty, challenges decades of liberal and conservative pieties to look squarely at the devastating effects that joblessness has had on our urban ghettos. Marshaling a vast array of data and the personal stories of hundreds of men and women, Wilson persuasively argues that problems endemic to America's inner cities--from fatherless households to drugs and violent crime--stem directly from the disappearance of blue-collar jobs in the wake of a globalized economy. Wilson's achievement is to portray this crisis as one that affects all Americans, and to propose solutions whose benefits would be felt across our society. At a time when welfare is ending and our country's racial dialectic is more strained than ever, When Work Disappears is a sane, courageous, and desperately important work. (publisher abstract)

    Wilson, one of our foremost authorities on race and poverty, challenges decades of liberal and conservative pieties to look squarely at the devastating effects that joblessness has had on our urban ghettos. Marshaling a vast array of data and the personal stories of hundreds of men and women, Wilson persuasively argues that problems endemic to America's inner cities--from fatherless households to drugs and violent crime--stem directly from the disappearance of blue-collar jobs in the wake of a globalized economy. Wilson's achievement is to portray this crisis as one that affects all Americans, and to propose solutions whose benefits would be felt across our society. At a time when welfare is ending and our country's racial dialectic is more strained than ever, When Work Disappears is a sane, courageous, and desperately important work. (publisher abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kramer, Fredrica D.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1998

    This publication, one of a series designed to help policymakers and TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) agency personnel, offers a baseline for understanding the challenge of serving persons who are being forced off welfare rolls but who are hard to place in employment. The following topics are covered: (1) policy issues (who should be considered hard to place?; interaction of work requirements and time limits for hard-to-place); (2) research findings (prevalence of potential employment barriers; relationship to work); (3) program options (assessment tools; staffing; service options; funding options); and (4) innovative practices (special needs; post-employment strategies; and comprehensive models). A list of 14 resources contacts and 18 publications is included. (author abstract)

    This publication, one of a series designed to help policymakers and TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) agency personnel, offers a baseline for understanding the challenge of serving persons who are being forced off welfare rolls but who are hard to place in employment. The following topics are covered: (1) policy issues (who should be considered hard to place?; interaction of work requirements and time limits for hard-to-place); (2) research findings (prevalence of potential employment barriers; relationship to work); (3) program options (assessment tools; staffing; service options; funding options); and (4) innovative practices (special needs; post-employment strategies; and comprehensive models). A list of 14 resources contacts and 18 publications is included. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bugarin, Alicia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    This report presents information on services, funding, clientele and program outcomes for 39 of California's job training, employment and vocational education programs. The information may be particularly useful as the Legislature considers the Governor's proposal to reorganize key employment programs. (publisher abstract)

    This report presents information on services, funding, clientele and program outcomes for 39 of California's job training, employment and vocational education programs. The information may be particularly useful as the Legislature considers the Governor's proposal to reorganize key employment programs. (publisher abstract)

  • Individual Author: Western, Bruce ; Kling, Jeffrey R. ; Weiman, David F.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2001

    Rapid growth in the incarceration rate over the past two decades has made prison time a routine event in the life course of young, economically disadvantaged Black and Hispanic men. Although incarceration may now have large effects on economic inequality, only a few studies systematically examine the labor market experiences of ex-offenders. We review the mechanisms that plausibly link incarceration to employment and earnings and discuss the challenges of causal inference for a highly self-selected sample of criminal offenders. There is little consensus about the labor market effects of a variety of justice system sanctions, but there is consistent evidence for the negative effects of prison time on earnings, particularly among older or white-collar offenders. The labor market effects of incarceration are not yet well understood, but prior research suggests several promising avenues for future work. (author abstract)

    Rapid growth in the incarceration rate over the past two decades has made prison time a routine event in the life course of young, economically disadvantaged Black and Hispanic men. Although incarceration may now have large effects on economic inequality, only a few studies systematically examine the labor market experiences of ex-offenders. We review the mechanisms that plausibly link incarceration to employment and earnings and discuss the challenges of causal inference for a highly self-selected sample of criminal offenders. There is little consensus about the labor market effects of a variety of justice system sanctions, but there is consistent evidence for the negative effects of prison time on earnings, particularly among older or white-collar offenders. The labor market effects of incarceration are not yet well understood, but prior research suggests several promising avenues for future work. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hirsch, Amy E.; Dietrich, Sharon M.; Landau, Rue; Schneider, Peter D.; Ackelsberg, Irv; Bernstein-Baker, Judith; Hohenstein, Joseph
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2002

    Over 10 million children in the United States "have parents who were imprisoned at some point in their children's lives." In 2001, approximately 400,000 mothers and fathers will finish serving their prison or jail sentences and return home eager to rebuild their families and rebuild their lives.

    As these parents struggle to make a fresh start, they will encounter a myriad of legal barriers that will make it extraordinarily difficult for them to succeed in caring for their children, finding work, getting safe housing, going to school, accessing public benefits, or even, for immigrants, staying in the same country as their children. This report examines some of the barriers that, singly and in combination, tear families apart, create unemployment and homelessness, and guarantee failure, thereby harming parents and children, families, and communities.

    An individual experiencing any one of these problems is likely to find that it dominates his or her life. But an ex-offender might well confront several of these issues simultaneously. Sometimes these problems exacerbate...

    Over 10 million children in the United States "have parents who were imprisoned at some point in their children's lives." In 2001, approximately 400,000 mothers and fathers will finish serving their prison or jail sentences and return home eager to rebuild their families and rebuild their lives.

    As these parents struggle to make a fresh start, they will encounter a myriad of legal barriers that will make it extraordinarily difficult for them to succeed in caring for their children, finding work, getting safe housing, going to school, accessing public benefits, or even, for immigrants, staying in the same country as their children. This report examines some of the barriers that, singly and in combination, tear families apart, create unemployment and homelessness, and guarantee failure, thereby harming parents and children, families, and communities.

    An individual experiencing any one of these problems is likely to find that it dominates his or her life. But an ex-offender might well confront several of these issues simultaneously. Sometimes these problems exacerbate each other. For instance, a parent who cannot find stable housing is unlikely to find or keep employment or reunify his or her family. An ex-offender without income because of ineligibility for public benefits and lack of employment is unlikely to find stable housing. Cumulatively, these civil consequences of a criminal record can be devastating and will continue to punish an ex-offender—and his or her family—long after his or her formal sentence has been served.

    The report contains an introduction with background information on parents with criminal records, and chapters on employment, public benefits, housing, child welfare, student loans, and immigration. These chapters feature stories of ex-offenders who have confronted these barriers, illustrating the inequities of these collateral consequences.

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