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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Reference Type: Regulation
    Year: 2000

    The Administration for Children and Families is issuing final regulations to implement key tribal provisions of the new welfare block grant program enacted in 1996—the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, or TANF program and the new tribal work activities program—the Native Employment Works, or NEW Program. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA), Public Law 104-193, established the Tribal TANF and NEW Programs. Subsequent technical changes were enacted by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, Public Law 105-33. The TANF block grant program replaces the national welfare program known as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) and the related programs known as the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training Program (JOBS) and the Emergency Assistance (EA) program.

    These Final Rules reflect new Federal, Tribal, and State relationships in the administration of welfare programs; a new focus on moving TANF recipients into work; and a new emphasis on program information, measurement, and performance. They also reflect the...

    The Administration for Children and Families is issuing final regulations to implement key tribal provisions of the new welfare block grant program enacted in 1996—the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, or TANF program and the new tribal work activities program—the Native Employment Works, or NEW Program. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA), Public Law 104-193, established the Tribal TANF and NEW Programs. Subsequent technical changes were enacted by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, Public Law 105-33. The TANF block grant program replaces the national welfare program known as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) and the related programs known as the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training Program (JOBS) and the Emergency Assistance (EA) program.

    These Final Rules reflect new Federal, Tribal, and State relationships in the administration of welfare programs; a new focus on moving TANF recipients into work; and a new emphasis on program information, measurement, and performance. They also reflect the Administration's commitment to regulatory reform (author abstract).

    65 Fed. Reg. 8478 (2000). 

     

  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 2010

    This statute included provisions concerning the integrity of the Unemployment Compensation program, as well as continued grants to states under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program through  September 2011. It also included provisions relating to healthy marriage promotion and responsible fatherhood. 

    Public Law No. 111-291 (2010). 

     

    This statute included provisions concerning the integrity of the Unemployment Compensation program, as well as continued grants to states under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program through  September 2011. It also included provisions relating to healthy marriage promotion and responsible fatherhood. 

    Public Law No. 111-291 (2010). 

     

  • Individual Author: Austin, Algernon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    There are two very different experiences of the recession in some regions of the country. While Alaska and the Northern Plains states have had some of the lowest unemployment rates for whites since the start of the recession, these regions have had among the highest rates of joblessness for American Indians. This Issue Brief documents these extreme regional employment disparities as well as the smaller but still significant ones between American Indians and whites from the first half of 2007 to the first half of 2010. It presents American Indian and white unemployment rates and employment-to-population ratios nationally and broken down by region.

    The key findings are:

    • From the first half of 2007 to the first half of 2010, the American Indian unemployment rate nationally increased 7.7 percentage points to 15.2%. This increase was 1.6 times the size of the white increase.
    • By the first half of 2010, the unemployment rate for Alaska Natives jumped 6.3 percentage points to 21.3%—the highest regional unemployment rate for American Indians.
    • Since the...

    There are two very different experiences of the recession in some regions of the country. While Alaska and the Northern Plains states have had some of the lowest unemployment rates for whites since the start of the recession, these regions have had among the highest rates of joblessness for American Indians. This Issue Brief documents these extreme regional employment disparities as well as the smaller but still significant ones between American Indians and whites from the first half of 2007 to the first half of 2010. It presents American Indian and white unemployment rates and employment-to-population ratios nationally and broken down by region.

    The key findings are:

    • From the first half of 2007 to the first half of 2010, the American Indian unemployment rate nationally increased 7.7 percentage points to 15.2%. This increase was 1.6 times the size of the white increase.
    • By the first half of 2010, the unemployment rate for Alaska Natives jumped 6.3 percentage points to 21.3%—the highest regional unemployment rate for American Indians.
    • Since the start of the recession, American Indians in the Midwest (see Table 1 for the states within each region) experienced the greatest increase in unemployment, growing by 10.3 percentage points to 19.3%.
    • By the first half of this year, slightly more than half—51.5%—of American Indians nationally were working, down from 58.3% in the first half of 2007.
    • In the first half of this year, only 44% of American Indians in the Northern Plains were working, the worst employment rate for Native Americans regionally.
    • The employment situation is the worst for American Indians in some of the same regions where it is best for whites: Alaska and the Northern Plains.

    (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Meit, Michael; Bushar, Jessica; Langerman, Heather; Scherer, Hilary; Hafford, Carol; Knudson, Alana; Hernandez, Aleena; Dotomain, Evangeline; Allis, Paul
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    This practice brief is the first in a series of practice briefs being developed by the Tribal HPOG evaluation team, comprised of NORC at the University of Chicago, Red Star Innovations, and the National Indian Health Board. The briefs will be used to disseminate important lessons learned and findings from the Evaluation of the Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) program , which is being funded by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation within the Administration for Children and Families. The Tribal HPOG program is funded by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to support 32 demonstration projects, including 5 Tribal Organizations and Colleges, to train Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals as health care professionals. The purpose of this first practice brief is to: (1) describe the unique aspects of the Tribal HPOG grantee organizations and the target populations they serve; (2) introduce the program frameworks of the Tribal HPOG grantees; and (3) provide an overview of the Federally-sponsored evaluation of the...

    This practice brief is the first in a series of practice briefs being developed by the Tribal HPOG evaluation team, comprised of NORC at the University of Chicago, Red Star Innovations, and the National Indian Health Board. The briefs will be used to disseminate important lessons learned and findings from the Evaluation of the Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) program , which is being funded by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation within the Administration for Children and Families. The Tribal HPOG program is funded by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to support 32 demonstration projects, including 5 Tribal Organizations and Colleges, to train Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals as health care professionals. The purpose of this first practice brief is to: (1) describe the unique aspects of the Tribal HPOG grantee organizations and the target populations they serve; (2) introduce the program frameworks of the Tribal HPOG grantees; and (3) provide an overview of the Federally-sponsored evaluation of the Tribal HPOG grantees. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Berman, Jacqueline; Coffee-Borden, Brandon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (the Recovery Act) used various strategies to redress unemployment challenges experienced by disadvantaged youth. The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) in the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) received $1.2 billion for youth training and employment services.  ETA allocated about $17.8 million of these funds to Indian and Native American (INA) youth through the INA Supplemental Youth Services Program.  INA grantees were encouraged to use these funds to provide employment experiences to youth in summer 2009 and summer 2010.  INA grantees responded by building on existing summer youth employment programs to extend services to additional youth, including older youth, and create new program components as appropriate and needed.

    This report describes the context in which programs for the INA Summer Youth Employment Initiative were created and provides a detailed discussion of how grantees used their Recovery Act funds to implement programs to serve youth in their communities.  The analysis is...

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (the Recovery Act) used various strategies to redress unemployment challenges experienced by disadvantaged youth. The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) in the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) received $1.2 billion for youth training and employment services.  ETA allocated about $17.8 million of these funds to Indian and Native American (INA) youth through the INA Supplemental Youth Services Program.  INA grantees were encouraged to use these funds to provide employment experiences to youth in summer 2009 and summer 2010.  INA grantees responded by building on existing summer youth employment programs to extend services to additional youth, including older youth, and create new program components as appropriate and needed.

    This report describes the context in which programs for the INA Summer Youth Employment Initiative were created and provides a detailed discussion of how grantees used their Recovery Act funds to implement programs to serve youth in their communities.  The analysis is based on INA grantees’ performance measure data and qualitative data collected during site visits to a purposive sample of five diverse grantees in five states.  This report also highlights key findings and innovations grantees made to better serve youth. (author abstract)

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