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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Vinokur, Amiram D.; van Ryn, Michelle; Gramlich, Edward M.; Price, RIchard H.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1991

    Results are reported from a 2 1/2 year follow-up of respondents who participated in a randomized field experiment that included the Jobs Program, a preventive intervention for unemployed persons. The intervention was intended to prevent poor mental health and loss of motivation to seek reemployment and to promote high-quality reemployment. The results of the long-term follow-up were consistent with those found 1 and 4 months after intervention (Caplan, Vinokur, Price, & van Ryn, 1989). The results demonstrate the continued beneficial effects of the intervention on monthly earnings, level of employment, and episodes of employer and job changes. These findings are supported by a benefit-cost analysis, which demonstrates large net benefits of the intervention to the participants and to the federal and state government programs that supported the project. (author abstract)

    Results are reported from a 2 1/2 year follow-up of respondents who participated in a randomized field experiment that included the Jobs Program, a preventive intervention for unemployed persons. The intervention was intended to prevent poor mental health and loss of motivation to seek reemployment and to promote high-quality reemployment. The results of the long-term follow-up were consistent with those found 1 and 4 months after intervention (Caplan, Vinokur, Price, & van Ryn, 1989). The results demonstrate the continued beneficial effects of the intervention on monthly earnings, level of employment, and episodes of employer and job changes. These findings are supported by a benefit-cost analysis, which demonstrates large net benefits of the intervention to the participants and to the federal and state government programs that supported the project. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fein, David J. ; Beecroft, Erik; Blomquist, John D.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1994

    As in the current debate over the direction of national welfare reform, much of the inspiration for the 1988 Family Support Act (FSA) -- the last major reform -- was provided by a series of state demonstrations operating under federal waiver authority. Ohio’s Transitions to Independence Demonstration was one of the most comprehensive of the pre-1988 FSA waiver initiatives authorized by the Reagan Administration’s Low Income Advisory Board. Transitions to Independence consisted of three separate interventions, each directed to the needs of a different subpopulation of recipients of Aid to Dependent Children (ADC), as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) is known in Ohio. (author abstract)

    As in the current debate over the direction of national welfare reform, much of the inspiration for the 1988 Family Support Act (FSA) -- the last major reform -- was provided by a series of state demonstrations operating under federal waiver authority. Ohio’s Transitions to Independence Demonstration was one of the most comprehensive of the pre-1988 FSA waiver initiatives authorized by the Reagan Administration’s Low Income Advisory Board. Transitions to Independence consisted of three separate interventions, each directed to the needs of a different subpopulation of recipients of Aid to Dependent Children (ADC), as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) is known in Ohio. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kemple, James J.; Friedlander, Daniel; Fellerath, Veronica
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1995

    This is the final report of a five-year evaluation of Florida’s statewide Project Independence program — Florida’s version of the federal-state Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS) Program. The program was intended to reduce public assistance costs by assisting welfare recipients to become self-sufficient. Project Independence emphasized relatively low-cost, independent job search services for the majority of its recipients and provided more expensive education and training services for those considered least able to find work on their own.

    The study found that for women with school-age children, Project Independence was effective, modestly increasing their employment and earnings and reducing their reliance on welfare, at no net cost to taxpayers. But for women with younger children, for whom child care outlays were higher and the program’s achievements smaller, taxpayers lost money and welfare families had less income. (author abstract)

    This is the final report of a five-year evaluation of Florida’s statewide Project Independence program — Florida’s version of the federal-state Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS) Program. The program was intended to reduce public assistance costs by assisting welfare recipients to become self-sufficient. Project Independence emphasized relatively low-cost, independent job search services for the majority of its recipients and provided more expensive education and training services for those considered least able to find work on their own.

    The study found that for women with school-age children, Project Independence was effective, modestly increasing their employment and earnings and reducing their reliance on welfare, at no net cost to taxpayers. But for women with younger children, for whom child care outlays were higher and the program’s achievements smaller, taxpayers lost money and welfare families had less income. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Card, David ; Robins, Philip K. ; Mijanovich, Tod ; Lin, Winston
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    This report presents an analysis of the early impacts of the Self-Sufficiency Project (SSP) on employment, earnings, and welfare receipt. (author abstract)

    This report presents an analysis of the early impacts of the Self-Sufficiency Project (SSP) on employment, earnings, and welfare receipt. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Social Research and Demonstration Corporation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    This report summarizes the early findings from the Self-Sufficiency Project (SSP), including lessons learned from implementing the project, from focus groups held with participants, and from an examination of the program’s effects on employment, earnings, and income assistance receipt in the first 18 months after random assignment. (author abstract)

    This report summarizes the early findings from the Self-Sufficiency Project (SSP), including lessons learned from implementing the project, from focus groups held with participants, and from an examination of the program’s effects on employment, earnings, and income assistance receipt in the first 18 months after random assignment. (author abstract)

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