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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Hollenbeck, Kevin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    Many individuals are grappling with the issue of whether to provide workers with training that upgrades the workers' basic academic skills. The corollary questions that flow from this issue are how to provide the training, how much training should be provided, and who should pay for the training. Workers are interested in this issue because they want to sustain productive, well-paying careers that will support adequate standards of living. Not receiving training may jeopardize their careers and earning power. Employers are interested in this issue because their economic role is to maximize corporate profits for stockholders. In most companies, worker productivity is the most important factor in determining output levels and profitability. Public policy makers are interested in the issue because if productive workers lose their jobs, the public may end up supporting them through income maintenance payments and financing job searches through the employment service. On the other hand, if basic skills-deficient workers get training and keep their jobs, they will continue to pay taxes...

    Many individuals are grappling with the issue of whether to provide workers with training that upgrades the workers' basic academic skills. The corollary questions that flow from this issue are how to provide the training, how much training should be provided, and who should pay for the training. Workers are interested in this issue because they want to sustain productive, well-paying careers that will support adequate standards of living. Not receiving training may jeopardize their careers and earning power. Employers are interested in this issue because their economic role is to maximize corporate profits for stockholders. In most companies, worker productivity is the most important factor in determining output levels and profitability. Public policy makers are interested in the issue because if productive workers lose their jobs, the public may end up supporting them through income maintenance payments and financing job searches through the employment service. On the other hand, if basic skills-deficient workers get training and keep their jobs, they will continue to pay taxes that support government activities. Educators are interested in the issue because they want to improve the educational system to reduce future basic skill deficiencies and because they may be involved in the upgrading of current workers. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Michalopoulos, Charles; Robins, Philip K.; Card, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    This report examines SSP’s impacts on applicants’ employment, income, and use of income assistance during the first 30 months after random assignment (that is, 18 months after sample members could first receive supplement payments).(author abstract)

    This report examines SSP’s impacts on applicants’ employment, income, and use of income assistance during the first 30 months after random assignment (that is, 18 months after sample members could first receive supplement payments).(author abstract)

  • Individual Author: King, Christopher; Norman; Patricia; O’Shea, Dan; Schroeder, Daniel
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    The Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources of the LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas-Austin prepared this report under contract with the Texas Workforce Commission and the Office of the Attorney General. These state agencies, along with the Office of Court Administration, were required by the 76th Texas Legislature (1999) to report to the next legislative session regarding the effectiveness of referring obligors to an employment assistance program as a means of increasing child support collections.   

    This report assesses the effect on child support collections of referring noncustodial parents from the Office of the Attorney General’s Child Support Division and IV-D Family Law Courts to workforce and other services designed to increase their income-producing and parenting capacities in Bexar County (San Antonio) and Harris County (Houston).  

    Child Support Division administrators and staff worked with local workforce and domestic court collaborators to establish procedures for service referrals from the IV-D courts as part of...

    The Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources of the LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas-Austin prepared this report under contract with the Texas Workforce Commission and the Office of the Attorney General. These state agencies, along with the Office of Court Administration, were required by the 76th Texas Legislature (1999) to report to the next legislative session regarding the effectiveness of referring obligors to an employment assistance program as a means of increasing child support collections.   

    This report assesses the effect on child support collections of referring noncustodial parents from the Office of the Attorney General’s Child Support Division and IV-D Family Law Courts to workforce and other services designed to increase their income-producing and parenting capacities in Bexar County (San Antonio) and Harris County (Houston).  

    Child Support Division administrators and staff worked with local workforce and domestic court collaborators to establish procedures for service referrals from the IV-D courts as part of child support adjudication.  Referrals are frequently a condition of probation for non-payment of child support or contempt of court.  In addition to mandatory, court-based referrals, Child Support Division staff in Harris County initiated voluntary referrals from the child support offices. (author abstract)  

  • Individual Author: Scrivener, Susan; Hendra, Richard; Redcross, Cindy; Bloom, Dan; Michalopoulos, Charles; Walter, Johanna
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    Vermont's Welfare Restructuring Project (WRP) was one of the earliest statewide reform programs initiated under waivers of federal welfare rules granted before the passage of the 1996 federal welfare reform law. Operating statewide from 1994 to 2001, WRP required single-parent welfare recipients to work in a wage-paying job after they had received cash assistance for 30 months, and it offered minimum-wage community service jobs to those who could not find regular, unsubsidized jobs. If a recipient did not comply with the work requirement, the state took control of her grant, used the money to pay her bills, and required her to attend frequent meetings at the welfare office. The program also included modest financial work incentives to encourage and reward work. Vermont's current welfare program shares many features with WRP.

    MDRC evaluated WRP under contract to the State of Vermont. Between 1994 and 1996, welfare applicants and recipients were assigned at random to WRP or to the Aid to Needy Families with Children (ANFC) group, which remained subject to the prior welfare...

    Vermont's Welfare Restructuring Project (WRP) was one of the earliest statewide reform programs initiated under waivers of federal welfare rules granted before the passage of the 1996 federal welfare reform law. Operating statewide from 1994 to 2001, WRP required single-parent welfare recipients to work in a wage-paying job after they had received cash assistance for 30 months, and it offered minimum-wage community service jobs to those who could not find regular, unsubsidized jobs. If a recipient did not comply with the work requirement, the state took control of her grant, used the money to pay her bills, and required her to attend frequent meetings at the welfare office. The program also included modest financial work incentives to encourage and reward work. Vermont's current welfare program shares many features with WRP.

    MDRC evaluated WRP under contract to the State of Vermont. Between 1994 and 1996, welfare applicants and recipients were assigned at random to WRP or to the Aid to Needy Families with Children (ANFC) group, which remained subject to the prior welfare rules. (A third group received WRP’s incentives but was not subject to the work requirement.) WRP's effects were estimated by comparing how the groups fared over a six-year follow-up period. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Perez-Johnson, Irma; Strong, Debra; Van Noy, Michelle
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    The Welfare-to-Work (WtW) grants program is one of several major federally funded initiatives to help welfare recipients and other low-income parents move into employment. In 1997, the Balanced Budget Act authorized the U.S. Department of Labor to award $3 billion in WtW grants to states and local organizations. These grants were intended to support efforts to help the hardest-to-employ recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), as well as noncustodial parents, prepare for employment, find jobs, stay employed, and advance in the job market.

    This report examines the costs of selected WtW programs that operated with federal grant support. The main objectives of the WtW cost analysis were to understand the cost structure of these programs and factors that influenced their costs. Program evaluators and planners should find this information useful in assessing the outcomes of WtW programs and in making decisions about future programs with similar objectives. The WtW cost analysis was part of a comprehensive, congressionally mandated evaluation of the WtW...

    The Welfare-to-Work (WtW) grants program is one of several major federally funded initiatives to help welfare recipients and other low-income parents move into employment. In 1997, the Balanced Budget Act authorized the U.S. Department of Labor to award $3 billion in WtW grants to states and local organizations. These grants were intended to support efforts to help the hardest-to-employ recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), as well as noncustodial parents, prepare for employment, find jobs, stay employed, and advance in the job market.

    This report examines the costs of selected WtW programs that operated with federal grant support. The main objectives of the WtW cost analysis were to understand the cost structure of these programs and factors that influenced their costs. Program evaluators and planners should find this information useful in assessing the outcomes of WtW programs and in making decisions about future programs with similar objectives. The WtW cost analysis was part of a comprehensive, congressionally mandated evaluation of the WtW federal grants program featuring a descriptive assessment of grantee efforts nationwide, a process and implementation study, and outcomes analysis. (author abstract)

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