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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Anderson, Jacquelyn; Martinson, Karin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    Considerable interest exists among state and local welfare departments, workforce investment agencies, community colleges, and other nonprofit community-based service providers to find ways to promote job retention and advancement among employed welfare recipients and other low-wage working families. Little is known, however, about what services are effective. The Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) evaluation, designed to provide more information about what works in this area, is the largest and most comprehensive study of its kind. Conceived and sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the evaluation is being conducted under contract by MDRC, a nonprofit, nonpartisan social policy research organization. The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has provided additional funding for the project. As of December 2002, a total of 15 ERA programs are being tested in 8 states. This report describes the initial experiences of those programs, focusing on implementation issues and institutional connections...

    Considerable interest exists among state and local welfare departments, workforce investment agencies, community colleges, and other nonprofit community-based service providers to find ways to promote job retention and advancement among employed welfare recipients and other low-wage working families. Little is known, however, about what services are effective. The Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) evaluation, designed to provide more information about what works in this area, is the largest and most comprehensive study of its kind. Conceived and sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the evaluation is being conducted under contract by MDRC, a nonprofit, nonpartisan social policy research organization. The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has provided additional funding for the project. As of December 2002, a total of 15 ERA programs are being tested in 8 states. This report describes the initial experiences of those programs, focusing on implementation issues and institutional connections. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Martinson, Karin; Trutko, John; Strong, Debra
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    The Welfare-to-Work (WtW) Grants Program, authorized by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, provides federal funding to states and local organizations to help welfare recipients and other low-income parents move into employment, stay employed, and improve their economic situation. Low-income noncustodial parents (NCPs) (mainly fathers) of welfare children are among the main target groups for WtW services, along with custodial parents who are receiving cash assistance under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program and moving from welfare to work. This focus reflects policymakers' growing interest in strategies to increase the employment and earnings of noncustodial fathers and thereby improve their ability to provide financial support for their children and play an active role in their lives.

    WtW grants represent a new source of funding for local work-focused services to NCPs. This report describes 11 local programs funded by WtW grants, in terms of the types of organizations operating the programs, the range of services offered, and the interagency...

    The Welfare-to-Work (WtW) Grants Program, authorized by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, provides federal funding to states and local organizations to help welfare recipients and other low-income parents move into employment, stay employed, and improve their economic situation. Low-income noncustodial parents (NCPs) (mainly fathers) of welfare children are among the main target groups for WtW services, along with custodial parents who are receiving cash assistance under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program and moving from welfare to work. This focus reflects policymakers' growing interest in strategies to increase the employment and earnings of noncustodial fathers and thereby improve their ability to provide financial support for their children and play an active role in their lives.

    WtW grants represent a new source of funding for local work-focused services to NCPs. This report describes 11 local programs funded by WtW grants, in terms of the types of organizations operating the programs, the range of services offered, and the interagency collaborations in effect. No single strategy or set of services predominates. Rather, local grant recipients have discretion in developing and implementing program models, within the parameters of the WtW regulations. Thus, the experiences of these programs illustrate a variety of strategies and approaches that are being implemented around the nation and highlight key issues that must be addressed to serve this population group. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: King, Christopher; Norman; Patricia; O’Shea, Dan; Schroeder, Daniel
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    The Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources of the LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas-Austin prepared this report under contract with the Texas Workforce Commission and the Office of the Attorney General. These state agencies, along with the Office of Court Administration, were required by the 76th Texas Legislature (1999) to report to the next legislative session regarding the effectiveness of referring obligors to an employment assistance program as a means of increasing child support collections.   

    This report assesses the effect on child support collections of referring noncustodial parents from the Office of the Attorney General’s Child Support Division and IV-D Family Law Courts to workforce and other services designed to increase their income-producing and parenting capacities in Bexar County (San Antonio) and Harris County (Houston).  

    Child Support Division administrators and staff worked with local workforce and domestic court collaborators to establish procedures for service referrals from the IV-D courts as part of...

    The Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources of the LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas-Austin prepared this report under contract with the Texas Workforce Commission and the Office of the Attorney General. These state agencies, along with the Office of Court Administration, were required by the 76th Texas Legislature (1999) to report to the next legislative session regarding the effectiveness of referring obligors to an employment assistance program as a means of increasing child support collections.   

    This report assesses the effect on child support collections of referring noncustodial parents from the Office of the Attorney General’s Child Support Division and IV-D Family Law Courts to workforce and other services designed to increase their income-producing and parenting capacities in Bexar County (San Antonio) and Harris County (Houston).  

    Child Support Division administrators and staff worked with local workforce and domestic court collaborators to establish procedures for service referrals from the IV-D courts as part of child support adjudication.  Referrals are frequently a condition of probation for non-payment of child support or contempt of court.  In addition to mandatory, court-based referrals, Child Support Division staff in Harris County initiated voluntary referrals from the child support offices. (author abstract)  

  • Individual Author: Bloom, Dan; Anderson, Jacquelyn; Wavelet, Melissa; Gardiner, Karen N.; Fishman, Michael E.
    Reference Type:
    Year: 2002

    The welfare reforms of the 1990s dramatically increased the need for effective strategies to help low-income parents work more steadily and advance in the labor market; long-term reliance on public assistance is no longer an option for most families. Yet, while a great deal is known about how to help welfare recipients prepare for and find jobs, there is little hard evidence about what works to promote employment retention and advancement. The Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) evaluation is the most comprehensive attempt thus far to understand which program models are most effective in promoting stable employment and career progression for welfare recipients and other low-income workers. Conceived and sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the ERA project includes up to 15 random assignment experiments across the country. The evaluation is being conducted under contract to ACF by the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC), a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization. MDRC, with...

    The welfare reforms of the 1990s dramatically increased the need for effective strategies to help low-income parents work more steadily and advance in the labor market; long-term reliance on public assistance is no longer an option for most families. Yet, while a great deal is known about how to help welfare recipients prepare for and find jobs, there is little hard evidence about what works to promote employment retention and advancement. The Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) evaluation is the most comprehensive attempt thus far to understand which program models are most effective in promoting stable employment and career progression for welfare recipients and other low-income workers. Conceived and sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the ERA project includes up to 15 random assignment experiments across the country. The evaluation is being conducted under contract to ACF by the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC), a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization. MDRC, with assistance from the Lewin Group, is also providing technical assistance to help make the ERA programs as strong as possible. This first report on the ERA evaluation, which began in late 1999, describes the emerging ERA programs and identifies some early lessons on the design and implementation of relatively large-scale retention and advancement programs. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Turnham, Jennifer; Cortes, Alvaro; Wood, Michelle; Berrien, Jenny
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    In February and March 2002, Abt Associates completed qualitative, in-person interviews with 75 individuals who are part of the evaluation of the Welfare to Work Voucher (WtWV) program. These interviews provide the first in-depth look at the experiences of WtW voucher recipients and the kinds of housing and employment choices these families have made since voucher issuance. The WtWV program was authorized by Congress in fiscal year 1999 and implemented in 131 public housing agencies (PHAs) beginning in December 1999. The program offered tenant-based rental assistance vouchers to current and former recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) as well as families eligible for TANF. The purpose of the rental assistance is to help voucher recipients in their transition from welfare to economic self-sufficiency. (author introduction)

    In February and March 2002, Abt Associates completed qualitative, in-person interviews with 75 individuals who are part of the evaluation of the Welfare to Work Voucher (WtWV) program. These interviews provide the first in-depth look at the experiences of WtW voucher recipients and the kinds of housing and employment choices these families have made since voucher issuance. The WtWV program was authorized by Congress in fiscal year 1999 and implemented in 131 public housing agencies (PHAs) beginning in December 1999. The program offered tenant-based rental assistance vouchers to current and former recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) as well as families eligible for TANF. The purpose of the rental assistance is to help voucher recipients in their transition from welfare to economic self-sufficiency. (author introduction)

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