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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1964

    This statute established a number of programs to improve the self-sufficiency of the poor, including Job Corps and other work training programs, community action programs to fight poverty at a local level, adult basic education programs, and Vista, a youth community service program. It also created loan programs for farms and small businesses, and pilot work-experience programs.

    Public Law No. 88-452 (1964).

    This statute established a number of programs to improve the self-sufficiency of the poor, including Job Corps and other work training programs, community action programs to fight poverty at a local level, adult basic education programs, and Vista, a youth community service program. It also created loan programs for farms and small businesses, and pilot work-experience programs.

    Public Law No. 88-452 (1964).

  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1988

    This statute made several changes that affect the Child Support Enforcement program under title IV-D of the Social Security Act, relating to paternity establishment, wage withholding, and job opportunities and basic skills training.

    Public Law No. 100-485 (1988).

     

    This statute made several changes that affect the Child Support Enforcement program under title IV-D of the Social Security Act, relating to paternity establishment, wage withholding, and job opportunities and basic skills training.

    Public Law No. 100-485 (1988).

     

  • Individual Author: Fein, David J. ; Beecroft, Erik; Blomquist, John D.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1994

    As in the current debate over the direction of national welfare reform, much of the inspiration for the 1988 Family Support Act (FSA) -- the last major reform -- was provided by a series of state demonstrations operating under federal waiver authority. Ohio’s Transitions to Independence Demonstration was one of the most comprehensive of the pre-1988 FSA waiver initiatives authorized by the Reagan Administration’s Low Income Advisory Board. Transitions to Independence consisted of three separate interventions, each directed to the needs of a different subpopulation of recipients of Aid to Dependent Children (ADC), as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) is known in Ohio. (author abstract)

    As in the current debate over the direction of national welfare reform, much of the inspiration for the 1988 Family Support Act (FSA) -- the last major reform -- was provided by a series of state demonstrations operating under federal waiver authority. Ohio’s Transitions to Independence Demonstration was one of the most comprehensive of the pre-1988 FSA waiver initiatives authorized by the Reagan Administration’s Low Income Advisory Board. Transitions to Independence consisted of three separate interventions, each directed to the needs of a different subpopulation of recipients of Aid to Dependent Children (ADC), as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) is known in Ohio. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Friedlander, Daniel; Martinson, Karin
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    Only small education effects were found for a large-scale program requiring participation in basic education by adult welfare recipients without a high school diploma or with low reading or math pretest scores. Positive results found in some of the research sites suggest that, with a focused program effort, GED certificates and improved achievement test scores may be obtained for individuals with pretest scores that are relatively high for this population. Raising achievement levels and increasing GED receipt appreciably among the many welfare recipients with lower pretest scores will require substantially improved program effectiveness. (author abstract)

    Only small education effects were found for a large-scale program requiring participation in basic education by adult welfare recipients without a high school diploma or with low reading or math pretest scores. Positive results found in some of the research sites suggest that, with a focused program effort, GED certificates and improved achievement test scores may be obtained for individuals with pretest scores that are relatively high for this population. Raising achievement levels and increasing GED receipt appreciably among the many welfare recipients with lower pretest scores will require substantially improved program effectiveness. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Watson, Vicki
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    Poverty has begun to increase slowly over the last decade. In 1985, 18.7 percent of the total population lived below the poverty level. By 1992, this percentage had increased to 19.4. The many problems faced by poor people provide a strong case for an approach which looks at meeting needs holistically (Le., meeting the needs of a family from housing to health care, day care and transportation to job and education assistance).

    Attaining financial self-sufficiency generally requires that a family or an individual receive a variety of services, generally sequenced over time. These may include education, job training, parenting, household budgeting, job search assistance, housing assistance, health or medical assistance, day care, and transportation assistance. Assistance is provided within a context of mutual responsibility entered into by the family or individual and the service providers, in which the provision of all or some of the services or assistance is predicated on the client's undertaking specific activities and attaining certain goals. The type and duration of...

    Poverty has begun to increase slowly over the last decade. In 1985, 18.7 percent of the total population lived below the poverty level. By 1992, this percentage had increased to 19.4. The many problems faced by poor people provide a strong case for an approach which looks at meeting needs holistically (Le., meeting the needs of a family from housing to health care, day care and transportation to job and education assistance).

    Attaining financial self-sufficiency generally requires that a family or an individual receive a variety of services, generally sequenced over time. These may include education, job training, parenting, household budgeting, job search assistance, housing assistance, health or medical assistance, day care, and transportation assistance. Assistance is provided within a context of mutual responsibility entered into by the family or individual and the service providers, in which the provision of all or some of the services or assistance is predicated on the client's undertaking specific activities and attaining certain goals. The type and duration of activities undertaken for the goal of self-sufficiency and the nature and levels of interim benchmarks or accomplishments will vary, in large part based on the resources, capabilities, and starting point of the family or person beginning the process of trying to reach self-sufficiency.

    This guidebook examines Michigan's HOME job training demonstration program to explore the use of the HOME program to spur financial self-sufficiency for low-income people. Other examples of housing used to further self-sufficiency include the Family Self-Sufficiency component of the Section 8 program and Texas's use of RTC properties to provide self-sufficiency opportunities for public housing residents, among others. In the FSS program, eligible Section 8 and public housing residents are provided opportunities for education, job training, counseling and other forms of social service assistance, while living in assisted housing, so that they may obtain the education, employment, and business and social skills necessary to achieve self-sufficiency. (author abstract)

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