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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
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  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Gilderbloom, John ; Rosentraub, Mark
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1990

    Programs and proposals for socially integrating disabled and elderly people have, traditionally, not received a great deal of support. To a limited extent this is changing. A number of social and political factors produced a unique task force in the Houston area which sought to capitalize on the depressed state of real estate and develop independent living situations for disabled people. A study detailed the extent to which large urban areas like Houston become "invisible jails" for the handicapped. The elders and the disabled are often trapped in restrictive living units and are unable to gain access to a city's resources by transportation systems not adapted for them. Several opportunities for creating a barrier free environment were found in an over-built residential sector. The responsibilities of urban areas for providing opportunities for all residents are considered. (author abstract)

    Programs and proposals for socially integrating disabled and elderly people have, traditionally, not received a great deal of support. To a limited extent this is changing. A number of social and political factors produced a unique task force in the Houston area which sought to capitalize on the depressed state of real estate and develop independent living situations for disabled people. A study detailed the extent to which large urban areas like Houston become "invisible jails" for the handicapped. The elders and the disabled are often trapped in restrictive living units and are unable to gain access to a city's resources by transportation systems not adapted for them. Several opportunities for creating a barrier free environment were found in an over-built residential sector. The responsibilities of urban areas for providing opportunities for all residents are considered. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rittner, Barbara; Kirk, Alan B.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1995

    This study presents survey data on low-income elderly people who attended daytime meal programs. The survey examined sociocultural and quality of life variables as they affected use of health care and transportation services. Most of the respondents self-reported their health status as poor or very poor, and more than half had no medical care during the preceding six months despite the presence of multiple physical symptoms. Social isolation from family or neighborhood support systems exacerbated problems with transportation, and most of the elderly people relied on public transportation to gain access to health services. Public transportation services posed additional barriers to health care use, among them fear.  (author abstract)

    This study presents survey data on low-income elderly people who attended daytime meal programs. The survey examined sociocultural and quality of life variables as they affected use of health care and transportation services. Most of the respondents self-reported their health status as poor or very poor, and more than half had no medical care during the preceding six months despite the presence of multiple physical symptoms. Social isolation from family or neighborhood support systems exacerbated problems with transportation, and most of the elderly people relied on public transportation to gain access to health services. Public transportation services posed additional barriers to health care use, among them fear.  (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ong, Paul M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    One barrier facing many welfare recipients is their geographic isolation from employment opportunities. Given the sprawling, automobile-oriented, urban structure of most U.S. cities, owning an automobile enables a welfare recipient to conduct a geographically broader job search, to accept offers farther away from home, to improve work attendance, and to keep the commute burden to a reasonable level. Data from a survey of more than 1,000 female heads of household in California receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children revealed that those owning an automobile enjoyed a significant advantage in terms of higher employment rates and total earnings. Given that automobiles are instrumental to better employment, welfare reform should facilitate the ownership of reliable transportation through modifications of eligibility requirements and the creation of support services. (journal abstract)

    One barrier facing many welfare recipients is their geographic isolation from employment opportunities. Given the sprawling, automobile-oriented, urban structure of most U.S. cities, owning an automobile enables a welfare recipient to conduct a geographically broader job search, to accept offers farther away from home, to improve work attendance, and to keep the commute burden to a reasonable level. Data from a survey of more than 1,000 female heads of household in California receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children revealed that those owning an automobile enjoyed a significant advantage in terms of higher employment rates and total earnings. Given that automobiles are instrumental to better employment, welfare reform should facilitate the ownership of reliable transportation through modifications of eligibility requirements and the creation of support services. (journal abstract)

  • Individual Author: Nightingale, Demetra S.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1997

    For all workers who are employed outside their home, getting to work is an obvious and important dimension of their employment. For those workers without easy access to transportation and/or long commutes, this logistic becomes increasingly important. As states are attempting to aggressively move welfare recipients into employment, transportation is being identified as one of the top barriers to employment. This paper provides a very brief summary of key background information on issues relevant to understanding the role of transportation in welfare reform. (Author abstract)

    For all workers who are employed outside their home, getting to work is an obvious and important dimension of their employment. For those workers without easy access to transportation and/or long commutes, this logistic becomes increasingly important. As states are attempting to aggressively move welfare recipients into employment, transportation is being identified as one of the top barriers to employment. This paper provides a very brief summary of key background information on issues relevant to understanding the role of transportation in welfare reform. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1998

    This statute authorized the Federal surface transportation programs for highways, highway safety, and transit for the period 1998-2003. It included a grants program relating to job access and reverse commutes, as well as provisions relating to welfare recipients’ involvement in highway construction job training programs.

    Public Law No. 105-178 (1998). 

     

    This statute authorized the Federal surface transportation programs for highways, highway safety, and transit for the period 1998-2003. It included a grants program relating to job access and reverse commutes, as well as provisions relating to welfare recipients’ involvement in highway construction job training programs.

    Public Law No. 105-178 (1998). 

     

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