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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Rosenbaum, Dottie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program’s (SNAP) primary purpose is to increase the food purchasing power of eligible low-income households in order to improve their nutrition and alleviate hunger and malnutrition.  The program’s success in meeting this core goal has been well documented.  Less well understood is the fact that the program has become quite effective in supporting work and that its performance in this area has improved substantially in recent years. (author abstract)

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program’s (SNAP) primary purpose is to increase the food purchasing power of eligible low-income households in order to improve their nutrition and alleviate hunger and malnutrition.  The program’s success in meeting this core goal has been well documented.  Less well understood is the fact that the program has become quite effective in supporting work and that its performance in this area has improved substantially in recent years. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kaz, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This report provides an extensive overview of Washington’s Basic Food Employment & Training (BFET) program and, more broadly, of federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment & Training (SNAP E&T).

    BFET is viewed as a national model for expanding SNAP E&T programs by building on the existing service delivery capacity of community colleges and community-based workforce training providers. This paper covers the history and development of the BFET program; the nuts and bolts of how the BFET program operates; how the BFET program is utilized by community colleges and community-based organizations; and a short overview of program outcomes. The paper summarizes the best practices that have emerged from BFET and offers recommendations to other states and localities in expanding SNAP E&T programs. (Author abstract)

    This report provides an extensive overview of Washington’s Basic Food Employment & Training (BFET) program and, more broadly, of federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment & Training (SNAP E&T).

    BFET is viewed as a national model for expanding SNAP E&T programs by building on the existing service delivery capacity of community colleges and community-based workforce training providers. This paper covers the history and development of the BFET program; the nuts and bolts of how the BFET program operates; how the BFET program is utilized by community colleges and community-based organizations; and a short overview of program outcomes. The paper summarizes the best practices that have emerged from BFET and offers recommendations to other states and localities in expanding SNAP E&T programs. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Minton, Sarah; Durham, Christin
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    The presentation provides an overview of variations in state Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) policies for families receiving other benefit assistance, and demonstrates use of the Transfer Income Model, v3 (TRIM3) -- a microsimulation model that simulates major government transfer, tax, and health insurance programs -- to estimate the combined impact of alternate public benefit policies on CCDF eligibility.

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    The presentation provides an overview of variations in state Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) policies for families receiving other benefit assistance, and demonstrates use of the Transfer Income Model, v3 (TRIM3) -- a microsimulation model that simulates major government transfer, tax, and health insurance programs -- to estimate the combined impact of alternate public benefit policies on CCDF eligibility.

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

  • Individual Author: Meisenheimer, Melanie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Poverty, hunger, and food insecurity disproportionately affect Americans who have communicative, mental, or physical disabilities. In this report, FRAC examines SNAP’s role among programs to assist people with disabilities as well as rules and policies that make SNAP accessible and responsive. It also looks at current law to  provide recommendations on how to strengthen SNAP’s support for people with disabilities through state policy options, agency practices, and outreach. (Author introduction)

     

    Poverty, hunger, and food insecurity disproportionately affect Americans who have communicative, mental, or physical disabilities. In this report, FRAC examines SNAP’s role among programs to assist people with disabilities as well as rules and policies that make SNAP accessible and responsive. It also looks at current law to  provide recommendations on how to strengthen SNAP’s support for people with disabilities through state policy options, agency practices, and outreach. (Author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Bolen, Ed; Foster, Marcie ; O'Callaghan, Susan; Zhang, Ting; Heiman, Patrick
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2016

    On January 28, 2016 from 2:00-3:30pm EST the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted The Connection Between SNAP and Work Webinar. During this free Webinar, attendees learned not only about the role of Supplemental Nutrition and Assistance Program's (SNAP) in promoting economic security and job development opportunities for low-income households, but also the ways in which the SNAP Employment and Training (E&T) program supports these efforts. Speakers from the United States Department of Agriculture, Seattle Jobs Initiative, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, and the University of Baltimore outlined the key factors that impact participants' work propensity, job tenure, and earnings, and described their experiences implementing, supporting, and evaluating programs that connect SNAP participants to employment. Mr. Ed Bolen, Ms. Marcie Foster, Ms. Susan O’Callaghan and Dr. Ting Zhang co-presented on the subject. Mr. Patrick Heiman moderated the discussion.

    This is a record of the questions and answers from the Webinar. Listen to the recording...

    On January 28, 2016 from 2:00-3:30pm EST the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted The Connection Between SNAP and Work Webinar. During this free Webinar, attendees learned not only about the role of Supplemental Nutrition and Assistance Program's (SNAP) in promoting economic security and job development opportunities for low-income households, but also the ways in which the SNAP Employment and Training (E&T) program supports these efforts. Speakers from the United States Department of Agriculture, Seattle Jobs Initiative, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, and the University of Baltimore outlined the key factors that impact participants' work propensity, job tenure, and earnings, and described their experiences implementing, supporting, and evaluating programs that connect SNAP participants to employment. Mr. Ed Bolen, Ms. Marcie Foster, Ms. Susan O’Callaghan and Dr. Ting Zhang co-presented on the subject. Mr. Patrick Heiman moderated the discussion.

    This is a record of the questions and answers from the Webinar. Listen to the recording from the Webinar here. The Webinar transcript can be found here. The PowerPoint Presentation can be found here.

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