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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Miller, Paul E.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1998

    The Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR) is an alternative to the Food Stamp program on Montana's seven Indian reservations. FDPIR is the main anti-hunger program on these reservations which have poverty rates, on average, that are three times higher than the state average. Of the 1,356 FDPIR households studied on the seven reservations, 56% have experienced hunger, as measured on a five-item index. Six out of 10 households rely on FDPIR as their main or only source of food. Any reductions in FDPIR that might result from federal welfare reform initiatives will cause increases in hunger on all reservations, especially among families with young children. (Author abstract)

    The Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR) is an alternative to the Food Stamp program on Montana's seven Indian reservations. FDPIR is the main anti-hunger program on these reservations which have poverty rates, on average, that are three times higher than the state average. Of the 1,356 FDPIR households studied on the seven reservations, 56% have experienced hunger, as measured on a five-item index. Six out of 10 households rely on FDPIR as their main or only source of food. Any reductions in FDPIR that might result from federal welfare reform initiatives will cause increases in hunger on all reservations, especially among families with young children. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 2000

    This statute established guidelines for Indian tribes to administer federal programs themselves. It enabled tribes to customize programs in nutrition, job training, and health to better fit their needs, and increased the jurisdiction of the tribes.

    Public Law No. 106-260 (2000).

    This statute established guidelines for Indian tribes to administer federal programs themselves. It enabled tribes to customize programs in nutrition, job training, and health to better fit their needs, and increased the jurisdiction of the tribes.

    Public Law No. 106-260 (2000).

  • Individual Author: Cole, Nancy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    This report describes Native American participation in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) based on data collected by the biennial WIC Participant and Program Characteristics Studies in 1992, 1994, 1996, and 1998. The report presents information on the geographic distribution, demographic characteristics, health status, and public health concerns of low-income Native American women, infants, and children participating in the WIC Program on and off reservations; describes Native American Tribes and the role of tribal governments in administering WIC programs; compares the characteristics of Native American WIC enrollees with all WIC enrollees; and examines the health status of Native American WIC enrollees. (author abstract)

    This report describes Native American participation in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) based on data collected by the biennial WIC Participant and Program Characteristics Studies in 1992, 1994, 1996, and 1998. The report presents information on the geographic distribution, demographic characteristics, health status, and public health concerns of low-income Native American women, infants, and children participating in the WIC Program on and off reservations; describes Native American Tribes and the role of tribal governments in administering WIC programs; compares the characteristics of Native American WIC enrollees with all WIC enrollees; and examines the health status of Native American WIC enrollees. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Finegold, Kenneth; Pindus, Nancy M.; Wherry, Laura; Nelson, Sandi; Triplett, Timothy; Capps, Randolph
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    This report, prepared for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, reviews existing data sources and prior research on six programs operated by the Department that provide food assistance to American Indians living on or near reservations. The purpose of the review is to help identify future research needs and opportunities to exploit administrative data systems and recurring national surveys. The programs covered are the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR), the Food Stamp Program (FSP), the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), the National School Lunch Program, the School Breakfast Program, and the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP). Research topics of continuing importance include the impacts of reservation food assistance on health and nutrition, the characteristics that make nutrition education effective on reservations, the dynamics of program participation, and the contribution of tribal administration to program coordination. (Author abstract)

    This report, prepared for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, reviews existing data sources and prior research on six programs operated by the Department that provide food assistance to American Indians living on or near reservations. The purpose of the review is to help identify future research needs and opportunities to exploit administrative data systems and recurring national surveys. The programs covered are the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR), the Food Stamp Program (FSP), the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), the National School Lunch Program, the School Breakfast Program, and the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP). Research topics of continuing importance include the impacts of reservation food assistance on health and nutrition, the characteristics that make nutrition education effective on reservations, the dynamics of program participation, and the contribution of tribal administration to program coordination. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gordon, Anne; Oddo, Vanessa
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    American Indians living on reservations or in other tribal areas (Indian Country) are among the most disadvantaged populations in the United States. The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA), section 141, requires the Department of Agriculture (USDA) to report to Congress on the ways that Federal nutrition programs can help overcome child hunger and nutrition problems on Indian reservations. To meet this requirement, this report addresses three questions:

    1. What is the level of food insecurity, obesity, and Type II diabetes1 among American Indian children living in Indian Country?
    2. What is the scope and reach of Federal nutrition programs in Indian Country?
    3. How can the HHFKA improve food security and reduce obesity and diabetes risk among American Indian children living in Indian Country?

    Before addressing these issues, we briefly describe the population of American Indians (AIs) as a whole and those living in Indian Country. We define AIs, in general, as those who report American Indian as their race in the U.S. Census or other national...

    American Indians living on reservations or in other tribal areas (Indian Country) are among the most disadvantaged populations in the United States. The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA), section 141, requires the Department of Agriculture (USDA) to report to Congress on the ways that Federal nutrition programs can help overcome child hunger and nutrition problems on Indian reservations. To meet this requirement, this report addresses three questions:

    1. What is the level of food insecurity, obesity, and Type II diabetes1 among American Indian children living in Indian Country?
    2. What is the scope and reach of Federal nutrition programs in Indian Country?
    3. How can the HHFKA improve food security and reduce obesity and diabetes risk among American Indian children living in Indian Country?

    Before addressing these issues, we briefly describe the population of American Indians (AIs) as a whole and those living in Indian Country. We define AIs, in general, as those who report American Indian as their race in the U.S. Census or other national surveys and are not Alaska Natives (ANs). In some instances, however, we report data on AIs and ANs together, as that is all that is available, and ANs are less than 10 percent of the combined group. Whenever not stated otherwise, we use those reporting AI or AN as their only race. (author abstract)

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