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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Schirm, Allen L.; Castner, Laura A.
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1999

    This is the fourth report in a series of publications presenting estimates of the percentage of eligible persons, by State, who participate in the Food Stamp Program (FSP). This issue presents food stamp participation rates for States in September 1999 and the change between September 1994 and September 1999. This information can be used to assess recent trends in program performance and focus efforts for improvement.

    This report also presents revised estimates of FSP participation rates for States in September of 1994 to 1998. These estimates differ from those previously reported because of improvements in data and estimation methods. (author abstract)

    This is the fourth report in a series of publications presenting estimates of the percentage of eligible persons, by State, who participate in the Food Stamp Program (FSP). This issue presents food stamp participation rates for States in September 1999 and the change between September 1994 and September 1999. This information can be used to assess recent trends in program performance and focus efforts for improvement.

    This report also presents revised estimates of FSP participation rates for States in September of 1994 to 1998. These estimates differ from those previously reported because of improvements in data and estimation methods. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schirm, Allen L.
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2000

    This is the second report in a series of publications that presents estimates of the percentage of eligible persons, by State, who participate in the Food Stamp Program. This issue presents food stamp participation rates for States in September 1997 and the changes in State rates between September 1994 and September 1997. This information can be used to examine States’ performance over this period and help understand the effects on food stamp participation rates of a strong economy with expanding job opportunities and the very early consequences of welfare reform and food stamp changes that were brought about by the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996. (author abstract)

     

     

    This is the second report in a series of publications that presents estimates of the percentage of eligible persons, by State, who participate in the Food Stamp Program. This issue presents food stamp participation rates for States in September 1997 and the changes in State rates between September 1994 and September 1997. This information can be used to examine States’ performance over this period and help understand the effects on food stamp participation rates of a strong economy with expanding job opportunities and the very early consequences of welfare reform and food stamp changes that were brought about by the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996. (author abstract)

     

     

  • Individual Author: Schirm, Allen L.
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2001

    This is the third report in a series of publications presenting estimates of the percentage of eligible persons, by State, who participate in the Food Stamp Program (FSP). This issue presents food stamp participation rates for States in September 1998 and the change between September 1994 and September 1998. This information can be used to assess recent trends in program performance and focus efforts for improvement.

    This report also presents revised estimates of FSP participation rates for States in September of 1994 to 1997. These estimates are different from those previously reported because of improvements in data and estimation methods. (author abstract)

    This is the third report in a series of publications presenting estimates of the percentage of eligible persons, by State, who participate in the Food Stamp Program (FSP). This issue presents food stamp participation rates for States in September 1998 and the change between September 1994 and September 1998. This information can be used to assess recent trends in program performance and focus efforts for improvement.

    This report also presents revised estimates of FSP participation rates for States in September of 1994 to 1997. These estimates are different from those previously reported because of improvements in data and estimation methods. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Services, Office of Research and Analysis
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2002

    Food stamp statutes and regulations provide State agencies with numerous policy options. By selecting among these options, State agencies can target benefits to those most in need, streamline program administration, and coordinate their FSP activities with those of other programs. The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) occasionally surveys State agencies to determine which policy options they are using. While information about State agency choices among policy options is subject to frequent change, this report catalogs choices that are current as of April, 2002.

    The first section of the report describes many of these options and lists the States that have selected each of them. The second section lists the States in alphabetical order and shows which options each State has selected. (author abstract)

    Food stamp statutes and regulations provide State agencies with numerous policy options. By selecting among these options, State agencies can target benefits to those most in need, streamline program administration, and coordinate their FSP activities with those of other programs. The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) occasionally surveys State agencies to determine which policy options they are using. While information about State agency choices among policy options is subject to frequent change, this report catalogs choices that are current as of April, 2002.

    The first section of the report describes many of these options and lists the States that have selected each of them. The second section lists the States in alphabetical order and shows which options each State has selected. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Services, Office of Research and Analysis
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2003

    Food Stamp Program (FSP) statutes and regulations provide State agencies with numerous policy options. State agencies use this flexibility to improve how the program works in meeting the nutritional needs of low-income people across the nation. Choosing certain options can facilitate program design goals such as removing or reducing barriers to access and sustained participation for low-income families and individuals, providing better support for those working or looking for work, targeting benefits to those most in need, streamlining administration and field operations, and coordinating FSP activities with those of other programs. With passage of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002, the array of policy options was significantly expanded in several key areas.

    The earliest effective date by which interested State agencies could implement the additional options from the Farm Bill was October 2002. The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) intermittently surveys State agencies administering the Food Stamp Program to determine which policy options are in use....

    Food Stamp Program (FSP) statutes and regulations provide State agencies with numerous policy options. State agencies use this flexibility to improve how the program works in meeting the nutritional needs of low-income people across the nation. Choosing certain options can facilitate program design goals such as removing or reducing barriers to access and sustained participation for low-income families and individuals, providing better support for those working or looking for work, targeting benefits to those most in need, streamlining administration and field operations, and coordinating FSP activities with those of other programs. With passage of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002, the array of policy options was significantly expanded in several key areas.

    The earliest effective date by which interested State agencies could implement the additional options from the Farm Bill was October 2002. The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) intermittently surveys State agencies administering the Food Stamp Program to determine which policy options are in use. Information about State agency choices among policy options is subject to frequent change. This report catalogs choices in effect as of October 2003. Several States have plans to implement various options at later dates. Those choices will be reflected in future editions of this report.

    The first section of the report describes the options and lists the States that have selected each of them. The new options presented here from the Farm Bill are denoted with the Farm Bill logo. Information is shown in tabular and map formats. Due to limitations of the mapping program used, Guam and the Virgin Islands are not included in the geographical displays. See the map legends for information on these territories. The second section lists the States in alphabetical order and shows the status of each State agency in relation to each policy option. Please contact John Knaus (703-305-2098) with questions, corrections, or suggestions about this edition of the State Options Report. (author abstract)

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