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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
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  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Heiman, Patrick; Pilkauskas, Natasha; Michelmore, Katherine; Curtis, Marah; McKernan, Pat
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2018

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar, Beyond Housing Policy: Human Service Policies to Address Housing Instability, on March 7, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm EST. The webinar focused on human service policies and programs that may directly influence low-income and vulnerable families’ housing stability. There is a well-established connection between consistent, stable, and affordable housing and positive family physical, emotional, and economic well-being. Housing instability – frequent moves because of social, familial, financial, mental health, and violence related issues – is common among low-income households and other vulnerable populations such as recently incarcerated individuals. A lack of stable housing is linked to increased food insecurity, mental health barriers, physical hardships, and poorer education outcomes for children. These negative outcomes become more prevalent and extreme when housing instability leads to homelessness. While there is little argument over housing stability and its connection to family self-sufficiency, there is...

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar, Beyond Housing Policy: Human Service Policies to Address Housing Instability, on March 7, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm EST. The webinar focused on human service policies and programs that may directly influence low-income and vulnerable families’ housing stability. There is a well-established connection between consistent, stable, and affordable housing and positive family physical, emotional, and economic well-being. Housing instability – frequent moves because of social, familial, financial, mental health, and violence related issues – is common among low-income households and other vulnerable populations such as recently incarcerated individuals. A lack of stable housing is linked to increased food insecurity, mental health barriers, physical hardships, and poorer education outcomes for children. These negative outcomes become more prevalent and extreme when housing instability leads to homelessness. While there is little argument over housing stability and its connection to family self-sufficiency, there is less clarity on how to efficiently and effectively address this housing challenge. The supply of affordable housing has declined while overall levels of housing instability have increased. There is evidence showing how housing subsidies for low-income individuals increase housing stability, but less than 25 percent of the 19 million eligible households receive this support. In addition, waiting lists for housing subsidies and other forms of assistance can be up to three years long. Given these challenges, it is important to understand the potential of other human services supports and policies, besides housing assistance, to promote positive housing outcomes for low-income individuals.

    This document is the transcript from Beyond Housing Policy: Human Service Policies to Address Housing Instability. Listen to the recording from the Webinar here. The webinar PowerPoint slides can be found here. A record of the question and answer session from the webinar can be found here.

  • Individual Author: Heiman, Patrick; Pilkauskas, Natasha; Michelmore, Katherine; Curtis, Marah; McKernan, Pat
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2018

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar, Beyond Housing Policy: Human Service Policies to Address Housing Instability, on March 7, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm EST. The webinar focused on human service policies and programs that may directly influence low-income and vulnerable families’ housing stability. There is a well-established connection between consistent, stable, and affordable housing and positive family physical, emotional, and economic well-being. Housing instability – frequent moves because of social, familial, financial, mental health, and violence related issues – is common among low-income households and other vulnerable populations such as recently incarcerated individuals. A lack of stable housing is linked to increased food insecurity, mental health barriers, physical hardships, and poorer education outcomes for children. These negative outcomes become more prevalent and extreme when housing instability leads to homelessness. While there is little argument over housing stability and its connection to family self-sufficiency, there is less...

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar, Beyond Housing Policy: Human Service Policies to Address Housing Instability, on March 7, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm EST. The webinar focused on human service policies and programs that may directly influence low-income and vulnerable families’ housing stability. There is a well-established connection between consistent, stable, and affordable housing and positive family physical, emotional, and economic well-being. Housing instability – frequent moves because of social, familial, financial, mental health, and violence related issues – is common among low-income households and other vulnerable populations such as recently incarcerated individuals. A lack of stable housing is linked to increased food insecurity, mental health barriers, physical hardships, and poorer education outcomes for children. These negative outcomes become more prevalent and extreme when housing instability leads to homelessness. While there is little argument over housing stability and its connection to family self-sufficiency, there is less clarity on how to efficiently and effectively address this housing challenge. The supply of affordable housing has declined while overall levels of housing instability have increased. There is evidence showing how housing subsidies for low-income individuals increase housing stability, but less than 25 percent of the 19 million eligible households receive this support. In addition, waiting lists for housing subsidies and other forms of assistance can be up to three years long. Given these challenges, it is important to understand the potential of other human services supports and policies, besides housing assistance, to promote positive housing outcomes for low-income individuals.

    This document is the Q&A from Beyond Housing Policy: Human Service Policies to Address Housing Instability. Listen to the recording from the Webinar here. The webinar transcript can be found here. The PowerPoint presentation from the webinar can be found here.

  • Individual Author: Heiman, Patrick; Pilkauskas, Natasha; Michelmore, Katherine; Curtis, Marah; McKernan, Pat
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2018

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar, Beyond Housing Policy: Human Service Policies to Address Housing Instability, on March 7, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm EST. The webinar focused on human service policies and programs that may directly influence low-income and vulnerable families’ housing stability. There is a well-established connection between consistent, stable, and affordable housing and positive family physical, emotional, and economic well-being. Housing instability – frequent moves because of social, familial, financial, mental health, and violence related issues – is common among low-income households and other vulnerable populations such as recently incarcerated individuals. A lack of stable housing is linked to increased food insecurity, mental health barriers, physical hardships, and poorer education outcomes for children. These negative outcomes become more prevalent and extreme when housing instability leads to homelessness. While there is little argument over housing stability and its connection to family self-sufficiency, there is less...

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar, Beyond Housing Policy: Human Service Policies to Address Housing Instability, on March 7, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm EST. The webinar focused on human service policies and programs that may directly influence low-income and vulnerable families’ housing stability. There is a well-established connection between consistent, stable, and affordable housing and positive family physical, emotional, and economic well-being. Housing instability – frequent moves because of social, familial, financial, mental health, and violence related issues – is common among low-income households and other vulnerable populations such as recently incarcerated individuals. A lack of stable housing is linked to increased food insecurity, mental health barriers, physical hardships, and poorer education outcomes for children. These negative outcomes become more prevalent and extreme when housing instability leads to homelessness. While there is little argument over housing stability and its connection to family self-sufficiency, there is less clarity on how to efficiently and effectively address this housing challenge. The supply of affordable housing has declined while overall levels of housing instability have increased. There is evidence showing how housing subsidies for low-income individuals increase housing stability, but less than 25 percent of the 19 million eligible households receive this support. In addition, waiting lists for housing subsidies and other forms of assistance can be up to three years long. Given these challenges, it is important to understand the potential of other human services supports and policies, besides housing assistance, to promote positive housing outcomes for low-income individuals.

    This is the PowerPoint presentation from the webinar. Listen to the recording from the Webinar here. The webinar transcript can be found here. A record of the question and answer session from the webinar can be found here.

  • Individual Author: Hughes, Michelle; Tucker, Whitney
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Research demonstrates the correlation between childhood adversities linked to poverty and negative outcomes in adulthood, indicating that poverty may itself be considered an adverse childhood experience. Because child poverty is a result of family economic circumstance, policy investments promoting family financial health are imperative to protect child well-being and North Carolina's future prosperity. (Author abstract)

     

    Research demonstrates the correlation between childhood adversities linked to poverty and negative outcomes in adulthood, indicating that poverty may itself be considered an adverse childhood experience. Because child poverty is a result of family economic circumstance, policy investments promoting family financial health are imperative to protect child well-being and North Carolina's future prosperity. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Bohn, Sarah; Danielson, Caroline; Thorman, Tess
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Despite improvements, the official poverty rate remains high. According to official poverty statistics, 14.3% of Californians lacked enough resources—about $24,300 per year for a family of four—to meet basic needs in 2016. The rate has declined significantly from 15.3% in 2015, but it is well above the most recent low of 12.4% in 2007. Moreover, the official poverty line does not account for California’s housing costs or other critical family expenses and resources. (Author excerpt)

    Despite improvements, the official poverty rate remains high. According to official poverty statistics, 14.3% of Californians lacked enough resources—about $24,300 per year for a family of four—to meet basic needs in 2016. The rate has declined significantly from 15.3% in 2015, but it is well above the most recent low of 12.4% in 2007. Moreover, the official poverty line does not account for California’s housing costs or other critical family expenses and resources. (Author excerpt)

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