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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Dinan, Kinsey Alden
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2005

    About 20 percent of this country’s children—nearly 17 million—have at least one foreign-born parent. These children are more likely to be low income and to experience other hardships than children with native-born parents. Altogether, children of immigrants comprise more than 26 percent of all low-income children in the United States. However, they are less likely than other children to benefit from government programs designed to assist low-income families.

    The federal government sets U.S. immigration policies that regulate the flow of immigrants into the United States. The federal government also bears primary responsibility for immigrant policies that determine the treatment of immigrants within the nation, although in recent years much of this responsibility has been shifted onto the states. Both types of policies have important implications for the economic security of immigrant families and set the context for state and local policy choices regarding immigrant children and their families.

    This brief is the first in a series that explores key policy issues...

    About 20 percent of this country’s children—nearly 17 million—have at least one foreign-born parent. These children are more likely to be low income and to experience other hardships than children with native-born parents. Altogether, children of immigrants comprise more than 26 percent of all low-income children in the United States. However, they are less likely than other children to benefit from government programs designed to assist low-income families.

    The federal government sets U.S. immigration policies that regulate the flow of immigrants into the United States. The federal government also bears primary responsibility for immigrant policies that determine the treatment of immigrants within the nation, although in recent years much of this responsibility has been shifted onto the states. Both types of policies have important implications for the economic security of immigrant families and set the context for state and local policy choices regarding immigrant children and their families.

    This brief is the first in a series that explores key policy issues related to children in low-income immigrant families. It provides an overview of federal policies that affect immigrant families’ access to key income and employment supports. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Zedlewski, Sheila R. ; Adams, Gina ; Dubay, Lisa; Kenney, Genevieve M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    This paper considers four programs—Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), food stamps, child care subsidies, and the earned income tax credit (EITC)—that form the core work support system for low-income working families in the United States. These programs potentially provide health insurance, assistance with food purchases, assistance with child care expenses, and an earned-income supplement to low-income working families that meet certain eligibility criteria. The paper begins by describing the recent evolution of these programs and the key differences and similarities in how their funding, eligibility, and delivery systems work. The next section describes recent trends in program participation and examines the receipt of benefits among working families in 2002. It then synthesizes the recent literature that helps to explain observed differences in program participation. The third section illustrates some recent innovations that attempt to deliver work supports to low-income families through a more efficient, coordinated system. The final...

    This paper considers four programs—Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), food stamps, child care subsidies, and the earned income tax credit (EITC)—that form the core work support system for low-income working families in the United States. These programs potentially provide health insurance, assistance with food purchases, assistance with child care expenses, and an earned-income supplement to low-income working families that meet certain eligibility criteria. The paper begins by describing the recent evolution of these programs and the key differences and similarities in how their funding, eligibility, and delivery systems work. The next section describes recent trends in program participation and examines the receipt of benefits among working families in 2002. It then synthesizes the recent literature that helps to explain observed differences in program participation. The third section illustrates some recent innovations that attempt to deliver work supports to low-income families through a more efficient, coordinated system. The final section summarizes our findings and their implications for improving the work support system in the United States. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Just, David R.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2006

    While there is mixed evidence of the impact of food assistance programs on obesity, there is general agreement that the food-insecure are at higher risk of obesity and obesity-related diseases. Food assistance programs, originally designed to overcome a lack of available food, now need to confront a very different problem: how to provide for the food-insecure while encouraging healthy lifestyles. This paper examines the potential to address these competing needs using traditional economic policies (manipulating information or prices) versus policies engaging behavioral economics and psychology. (Author abstract)

    While there is mixed evidence of the impact of food assistance programs on obesity, there is general agreement that the food-insecure are at higher risk of obesity and obesity-related diseases. Food assistance programs, originally designed to overcome a lack of available food, now need to confront a very different problem: how to provide for the food-insecure while encouraging healthy lifestyles. This paper examines the potential to address these competing needs using traditional economic policies (manipulating information or prices) versus policies engaging behavioral economics and psychology. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Zedlewski, Sheila; Zimmerman, Seth
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    Federal and state spending on work supports for low-income families grew between 2002 and 2005, with Medicaid accounting for most of the spending growth. After 2002 states spent less on child care, and federal EITC spending declined slightly as the number of employed parents decreased. Yet, food stamp spending increased as family incomes declined and program changes expanded eligibility and participation. The weaker economy also explained a large share of the increase in Medicaid spending. Differences in the design of programs and needs among families led to wide variation in the amount of support received by families across states. (author abstract)

    Federal and state spending on work supports for low-income families grew between 2002 and 2005, with Medicaid accounting for most of the spending growth. After 2002 states spent less on child care, and federal EITC spending declined slightly as the number of employed parents decreased. Yet, food stamp spending increased as family incomes declined and program changes expanded eligibility and participation. The weaker economy also explained a large share of the increase in Medicaid spending. Differences in the design of programs and needs among families led to wide variation in the amount of support received by families across states. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ratcliffe, Caroline; McKernan, Singe-Mary; Finegold, Kenneth
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    This paper uses monthly SIPP data from 1996 through 2003 and state-level policy data to measure the effects of specific food stamp and welfare policies, as well as the minimum wage and EITC, on the food stamp receipt of the low-income population. We find strong evidence that more lenient vehicle exemption policies, longer recertification periods, and expanded categorical eligibility increase food stamp receipt and that the use of biometric technology reduces food stamp receipt. We also find some evidence that more lenient immigrant eligibility rules, simplified reporting, implementation of the EBT program, and outreach spending increase food stamp receipt. (author abstract)

    This paper uses monthly SIPP data from 1996 through 2003 and state-level policy data to measure the effects of specific food stamp and welfare policies, as well as the minimum wage and EITC, on the food stamp receipt of the low-income population. We find strong evidence that more lenient vehicle exemption policies, longer recertification periods, and expanded categorical eligibility increase food stamp receipt and that the use of biometric technology reduces food stamp receipt. We also find some evidence that more lenient immigrant eligibility rules, simplified reporting, implementation of the EBT program, and outreach spending increase food stamp receipt. (author abstract)

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