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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Holzer, Harry J. ; Raphael, Steven ; Stoll, Michael A.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    The Reentry Roundtable entitled, The Employment Dimensions of Prisoner Reentry: Understanding the Nexus between Prisoner Reentry and Work, was held on May 19-20, 2003 in New York City. The Roundtable focused on several aspects of the employment-reentry link, including the employment profile of the prison population; the work experience in prison; applicable lessons from welfare to work; the employment barriers ex-offenders face; and the potential linkages between correctional systems, intervention programs, and private employers. The meeting aimed to identify policy and research opportunities geared to improving the employment prospects, and thereby the chances of successful reintegration, for hundred of thousands of people leaving prison each year. This paper discusses the barrier offenders face when returning to the work force, examining both the characteristics and attitudes of ex-offenders and employers. (author abstract)

    The Reentry Roundtable entitled, The Employment Dimensions of Prisoner Reentry: Understanding the Nexus between Prisoner Reentry and Work, was held on May 19-20, 2003 in New York City. The Roundtable focused on several aspects of the employment-reentry link, including the employment profile of the prison population; the work experience in prison; applicable lessons from welfare to work; the employment barriers ex-offenders face; and the potential linkages between correctional systems, intervention programs, and private employers. The meeting aimed to identify policy and research opportunities geared to improving the employment prospects, and thereby the chances of successful reintegration, for hundred of thousands of people leaving prison each year. This paper discusses the barrier offenders face when returning to the work force, examining both the characteristics and attitudes of ex-offenders and employers. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn; Farrell, Mary
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2013

    The presentation describes application of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) methodology -- applying behavioral economics to human services policies and programs - to improve child support program response by incarcerated non-custodial parents. The presenters described concrete changes made to the Texas Office of Attorney General's notification process (incl. design changes to the letter and application, more clear wording, and additional notices) and resulting differences in child support modification applications and awards.

    This presentation was given at the 2013 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    The presentation describes application of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) methodology -- applying behavioral economics to human services policies and programs - to improve child support program response by incarcerated non-custodial parents. The presenters described concrete changes made to the Texas Office of Attorney General's notification process (incl. design changes to the letter and application, more clear wording, and additional notices) and resulting differences in child support modification applications and awards.

    This presentation was given at the 2013 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

  • Individual Author: Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn; Anzelone, Caitlin; Dechausay, Nadine; Datta, Saugato; Fiorillo, Alexandra; Potok, Louis; Darling, Matthew; Balz, John
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Insights from behavioral economics, which combines findings from psychology and economics, suggest that a deeper understanding of decision-making and behavior could improve human services program design and outcomes. Research has shown that small changes in the environment can facilitate behaviors and decisions that are in people’s best interest. However, there has been relatively little exploration of the potential application of this science to complex, large-scale human services programs.

    This report, from the early stages of OPRE’s Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project, provides an overview of behavioral economics, presents an approach to applying behavioral economics to social programs, shares insights from three case studies in the BIAS project, and concludes with some early lessons that have emerged from the work and next steps for the BIAS project. Additionally, a separate technical supplement to the report provides a description of 12 commonly applied behavioral interventions identified through a review of the literature. (author...

    Insights from behavioral economics, which combines findings from psychology and economics, suggest that a deeper understanding of decision-making and behavior could improve human services program design and outcomes. Research has shown that small changes in the environment can facilitate behaviors and decisions that are in people’s best interest. However, there has been relatively little exploration of the potential application of this science to complex, large-scale human services programs.

    This report, from the early stages of OPRE’s Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project, provides an overview of behavioral economics, presents an approach to applying behavioral economics to social programs, shares insights from three case studies in the BIAS project, and concludes with some early lessons that have emerged from the work and next steps for the BIAS project. Additionally, a separate technical supplement to the report provides a description of 12 commonly applied behavioral interventions identified through a review of the literature. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Farrell, Mary; Anzelone, Caitlin; Cullinan, Dan; Wille, Jessica
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project is the first major effort to apply a behavioral economics lens to programs that serve poor and vulnerable families in the United States. This report presents findings from a behavioral intervention designed to increase the number of incarcerated noncustodial parents in Texas who apply for modifications to reduce the amount of their child support orders. Using a method called “behavioral diagnosis and design” the program redesigned the mailings informing these parents of the option to apply for an order modification. The redesigned materials resulted in a significant increase in applications at relatively low cost and demonstrated the promise of applying behavioral economics principles to improve program implementation and outcomes. (author abstract)

    The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project is the first major effort to apply a behavioral economics lens to programs that serve poor and vulnerable families in the United States. This report presents findings from a behavioral intervention designed to increase the number of incarcerated noncustodial parents in Texas who apply for modifications to reduce the amount of their child support orders. Using a method called “behavioral diagnosis and design” the program redesigned the mailings informing these parents of the option to apply for an order modification. The redesigned materials resulted in a significant increase in applications at relatively low cost and demonstrated the promise of applying behavioral economics principles to improve program implementation and outcomes. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn; Farrell, Mary; Hayes, Michael; Baird, Peter; Brown, Susan
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    Insights from behavioral economics, which combines findings from psychology and economics, suggest that an improved understanding of human behavior and decision-making could inform program design and improve outcomes. OPRE’s Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self Sufficiency (BIAS) project designs and tests behaviorally-informed program innovations for ACF programs. This session will share early findings and lessons learned from BIAS’s work with child support agencies in Texas and Ohio. (conference program description)

    • Behavioral Economics and Social Policy: Designing Innovative Solutions for Programs Supported by the Administration for Children and Families

    Lashawn Richburg-Hayes (MDRC)

    The presentation gives an overview of how behavioral concepts are being applied to social policy within the context of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) Project.

    • Using Behavioral Economics to Help Incarcerated Parents Apply for Child Support Order Modifications

    Mary Farrell (MEF Associates)

    Michael Hayes (Texas Office...

    Insights from behavioral economics, which combines findings from psychology and economics, suggest that an improved understanding of human behavior and decision-making could inform program design and improve outcomes. OPRE’s Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self Sufficiency (BIAS) project designs and tests behaviorally-informed program innovations for ACF programs. This session will share early findings and lessons learned from BIAS’s work with child support agencies in Texas and Ohio. (conference program description)

    • Behavioral Economics and Social Policy: Designing Innovative Solutions for Programs Supported by the Administration for Children and Families

    Lashawn Richburg-Hayes (MDRC)

    The presentation gives an overview of how behavioral concepts are being applied to social policy within the context of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) Project.

    • Using Behavioral Economics to Help Incarcerated Parents Apply for Child Support Order Modifications

    Mary Farrell (MEF Associates)

    Michael Hayes (Texas Office of the Attorney General)

    The presentation describes the Texas pilot of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) Project, a program designed to increase the number of incarcerated, non-custodial parents who apply for child support order modifications.

    • Using Behavioral Economics to Increase Timely and Regular Child Support Payments

    Peter Baird (MDRC)

    Susan Brown (Franklin County Child Support Enforcement Agency

    The presentation describes the Franklin County, Ohio pilot of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) Project, an initiative to increase the total amounts of child support collected and the frequency of payments.

    These presentations were given at the 2014 Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (WREC).

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