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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Grinstein-Weiss, Michal; Lee, Jung-Sook; Greeson, Johanna K. P.; Han, Chang-Keun; Yeo, Yeong H.; Irish, Kate
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    For low-income families, homeownership represents an important strategy for promoting long-term social and economic development. Individual Development Account (IDA) programs facilitate saving toward assets such as a home through matching, financial education, and case management. Using longitudinal experimental data from the American Dream demonstration, this study examines the impact of IDA participation on homeownership rates and on clearing old debts. Low-income participants were interviewed after 18 months (Wave 2) and after program completion at 48 months (Wave 3).

    Logistic regression results indicate that among those who were renters at baseline, IDA participation significantly increases the clearing of old debts at Wave 2 and homeownership rates at Wave 3. IDA participants with cleared debt activity had the highest probability of becoming homeowners at Wave 3 (32 percent), while those who were not IDA participants and did not have such activity had only a 9.6 percent probability. (author abstract)

    For low-income families, homeownership represents an important strategy for promoting long-term social and economic development. Individual Development Account (IDA) programs facilitate saving toward assets such as a home through matching, financial education, and case management. Using longitudinal experimental data from the American Dream demonstration, this study examines the impact of IDA participation on homeownership rates and on clearing old debts. Low-income participants were interviewed after 18 months (Wave 2) and after program completion at 48 months (Wave 3).

    Logistic regression results indicate that among those who were renters at baseline, IDA participation significantly increases the clearing of old debts at Wave 2 and homeownership rates at Wave 3. IDA participants with cleared debt activity had the highest probability of becoming homeowners at Wave 3 (32 percent), while those who were not IDA participants and did not have such activity had only a 9.6 percent probability. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Grinstein-Weiss, Michal; Sherraden, Michael; Gale, William; Rohe, William M.; Schreiner, Mike; Key, Clinton
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    This paper presents evidence from a randomized field experiment to evaluate the longterm impact of an incentive for household saving. We examine the effect on homeownership of an Individual Development Account (IDA) program which ran from 1998 to 2003 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The IDA program provided low-income households with financial education and matching funds for qualified savings withdrawals, including a 2:1 match for housing down payments. About 90 percent of treatment group members opened IDA accounts, and contributions averaged about $1,800. Homeownership rates for both treatment and control groups increased substantially throughout the experiment. Prior work shows that from 1998 to 2003, homeownership rates increased more for treatment group members than for controls. We show in this paper, however, that control group members caught up rapidly with the treatment group after the experiment ended, so that the IDA program had no significant effect on homeownership rates among the full sample in 2009 and had no effect on the duration of homeownership during the study period....

    This paper presents evidence from a randomized field experiment to evaluate the longterm impact of an incentive for household saving. We examine the effect on homeownership of an Individual Development Account (IDA) program which ran from 1998 to 2003 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The IDA program provided low-income households with financial education and matching funds for qualified savings withdrawals, including a 2:1 match for housing down payments. About 90 percent of treatment group members opened IDA accounts, and contributions averaged about $1,800. Homeownership rates for both treatment and control groups increased substantially throughout the experiment. Prior work shows that from 1998 to 2003, homeownership rates increased more for treatment group members than for controls. We show in this paper, however, that control group members caught up rapidly with the treatment group after the experiment ended, so that the IDA program had no significant effect on homeownership rates among the full sample in 2009 and had no effect on the duration of homeownership during the study period. The program had a positive impact on homeownership rates among those with above-sample median income ($15,840) at the time they entered the program, but not on other subgroups that we tested. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Grinstein-Weiss, Michal; Sherraden, Michael; Gale, William G.; Rohe, William M.; Schreiner, Mark; Key, Clinton
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    We examine the long-term effects of a 1998-2003 randomized experiment in Tulsa, Oklahoma with Individual Development Accounts that offered low-income households 2:1 matching funds for housing down payments. Prior work shows that, among households who rented in 1998, homeownership rates increased more through 2003 in the treatment group than for controls. We show that control group renters caught up rapidly with the treatment group after the experiment ended. As of 2009, the program had an economically small and statistically insignificant effect on homeownership rates, the number of years respondents owned homes, home equity, and foreclosure activity among baseline renters. (author abstract)

    We examine the long-term effects of a 1998-2003 randomized experiment in Tulsa, Oklahoma with Individual Development Accounts that offered low-income households 2:1 matching funds for housing down payments. Prior work shows that, among households who rented in 1998, homeownership rates increased more through 2003 in the treatment group than for controls. We show that control group renters caught up rapidly with the treatment group after the experiment ended. As of 2009, the program had an economically small and statistically insignificant effect on homeownership rates, the number of years respondents owned homes, home equity, and foreclosure activity among baseline renters. (author abstract)