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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Vogel, Cheri A.; Xue, Yange; Moiduddin, Emily M.; Carlson, Barbara L.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    Early Head Start is a two-generation program for low-income pregnant women, and families with infants or toddlers that is designed to enhance children’s development and health and to strengthen family and community partnerships. A rigorous evaluation, the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project, was initiated the same time the program was authorized, following 3,001 children and families in 17 of the first programs funded. The children were randomly assigned either to the program group, or to the control group who were precluded from enrolling in Early Head Start, although they could receive other services in the community. The initial phase of the evaluation included an implementation study to document program services as well as an impact study, which followed children and their families until they were 3 years old with an ambitious measurement plan to assess the wide range of child and family outcomes that Early Head Start programs may influence. Two follow-up assessments have been conducted. Families were contacted in the prekindergarten year (when children were...

    Early Head Start is a two-generation program for low-income pregnant women, and families with infants or toddlers that is designed to enhance children’s development and health and to strengthen family and community partnerships. A rigorous evaluation, the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project, was initiated the same time the program was authorized, following 3,001 children and families in 17 of the first programs funded. The children were randomly assigned either to the program group, or to the control group who were precluded from enrolling in Early Head Start, although they could receive other services in the community. The initial phase of the evaluation included an implementation study to document program services as well as an impact study, which followed children and their families until they were 3 years old with an ambitious measurement plan to assess the wide range of child and family outcomes that Early Head Start programs may influence. Two follow-up assessments have been conducted. Families were contacted in the prekindergarten year (when children were about 5 years old), and this latest wave of follow-up occurred when children were in fifth grade, about 10 years of age. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lombardi, Joan; Mosle, Anne; Patel, Nisha; Schumacher, Rachel; Stedron, Jennifer
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Americans have always relied on a set of core beliefs that fall under the umbrella of "The American Dream." Hard work. Equal opportunity. Optimism. However, many feel these values are in jeopardy; many parents have a growing unease about the future-- their own futures and they children's futures. Major shifts in family demographics and structure, as well as in the skills and education required by the economy, mandate a change in how we help families succeed Two-generation approaches, which focus on creating opportunities for and meeting the needs of vulnerable children and their parents together, move the whole family toward educational success and economic security. Ascend is the national hub for two-generation approaches. In Gateways to Two Generations, Ascend considers the question: Will two-generation approaches applied to the early childhood development arena produce better outcomes for both children and parents? (author abstract)

    Americans have always relied on a set of core beliefs that fall under the umbrella of "The American Dream." Hard work. Equal opportunity. Optimism. However, many feel these values are in jeopardy; many parents have a growing unease about the future-- their own futures and they children's futures. Major shifts in family demographics and structure, as well as in the skills and education required by the economy, mandate a change in how we help families succeed Two-generation approaches, which focus on creating opportunities for and meeting the needs of vulnerable children and their parents together, move the whole family toward educational success and economic security. Ascend is the national hub for two-generation approaches. In Gateways to Two Generations, Ascend considers the question: Will two-generation approaches applied to the early childhood development arena produce better outcomes for both children and parents? (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    Most of the authors in this issue of Future of Children focus on a single strategy for helping both adults and children that could become a component of two-generation programs. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, on the other hand, look at actual programs with an explicit two-generation focus that have been tried in the past or are currently under way.

    These explicitly two-generation programs have sought to build human capital across generations by combining education or job training for adults with early childhood education for their children. Chase-Lansdale and Brooks-Gunn explain the theories behind these programs and review the evidence for their efficacy. A first wave of such programs in the 1980s and 1990s produced mostly disappointing results, but the evaluations they left behind pointed to promising new directions. More recently, a second wave of two-generation programs—the authors dub them “Two-Generation 2.0”—has sought to rectify the flaws of earlier efforts, largely by building strong connections between components for children and adults, by...

    Most of the authors in this issue of Future of Children focus on a single strategy for helping both adults and children that could become a component of two-generation programs. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, on the other hand, look at actual programs with an explicit two-generation focus that have been tried in the past or are currently under way.

    These explicitly two-generation programs have sought to build human capital across generations by combining education or job training for adults with early childhood education for their children. Chase-Lansdale and Brooks-Gunn explain the theories behind these programs and review the evidence for their efficacy. A first wave of such programs in the 1980s and 1990s produced mostly disappointing results, but the evaluations they left behind pointed to promising new directions. More recently, a second wave of two-generation programs—the authors dub them “Two-Generation 2.0”—has sought to rectify the flaws of earlier efforts, largely by building strong connections between components for children and adults, by ensuring that children and adults receive services of equal duration and intensity, and by incorporating advances in both education and workforce development. These Two-Generation 2.0 programs are still in their infancy, and we have yet to see clear evidence that they can achieve their goals or be implemented cost-effectively at scale. Nonetheless, Chase-Lansdale and Brooks-Gunn write, the theoretical justification for these programs is strong, their early results are promising, and the time is ripe for innovation, experimentation, and further study. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sommer, Teresa Eckrich; Sabol, Terri; Smith, Tara; Dow, Steven; Barczak, Monica; Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; King, Christopher T.
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book, Report
    Year: 2015

    Two-generation programs - which provide workforce development, skills training, and social capital development to parents while their children attend quality early childhood education programs - are a promising anti-poverty strategy and are gaining interest across the country. Early childhood education programs, like Head Start and Early Head Start, are central resources for improving the life opportunities of low-income children. Yet, few early learning centers explicitly target parents for postsecondary education and career training, despite the fact that increased parental education and family income are associated with better outcomes for children. The Community Action Project of Tulsa County, Oklahoma (CAP Tulsa) is at the forefront of innovation, implementation, and evaluation of two-generation programming. CAP Tulsa is a large, comprehensive antipoverty agency that focuses on early childhood education and economic security for families; it also serves as the Head Start and Early Head Start grantee for Tulsa County. It is one of the only fully operational, two-generation...

    Two-generation programs - which provide workforce development, skills training, and social capital development to parents while their children attend quality early childhood education programs - are a promising anti-poverty strategy and are gaining interest across the country. Early childhood education programs, like Head Start and Early Head Start, are central resources for improving the life opportunities of low-income children. Yet, few early learning centers explicitly target parents for postsecondary education and career training, despite the fact that increased parental education and family income are associated with better outcomes for children. The Community Action Project of Tulsa County, Oklahoma (CAP Tulsa) is at the forefront of innovation, implementation, and evaluation of two-generation programming. CAP Tulsa is a large, comprehensive antipoverty agency that focuses on early childhood education and economic security for families; it also serves as the Head Start and Early Head Start grantee for Tulsa County. It is one of the only fully operational, two-generation human capital programs that combine early childhood education services with stackable career training for parents. In 2010, CAP Tulsa was the recipient of a large federal award from the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) to bring its novel two-generation program to scale. (Excerpt from author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Sama-Miller, Emily; Ross, Christine; Eckrich Sommer, Teresa; Baumgartner, Scott; Roberts, Lily; Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The Exploration of Integrated Approaches to Supporting Child Development and Improving Family Economic Security project investigated the design and evaluability of approaches to alleviating poverty that address the needs of low-income parents and children. The project examined programs that deliberately combine services that are intended to support both child development and parental economic security. Recent advances in implementation science and other fields of research provide key insights for new programs that may prove more effective than similar programs designed in the 1980s and 1990s. The project was funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and was conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and Northwestern University. (Author introduction)

    The Exploration of Integrated Approaches to Supporting Child Development and Improving Family Economic Security project investigated the design and evaluability of approaches to alleviating poverty that address the needs of low-income parents and children. The project examined programs that deliberately combine services that are intended to support both child development and parental economic security. Recent advances in implementation science and other fields of research provide key insights for new programs that may prove more effective than similar programs designed in the 1980s and 1990s. The project was funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and was conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and Northwestern University. (Author introduction)

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