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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Popkin, Susan J.; McDaniel, Marla
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Building on research in distressed public housing communities, we argue for a new approach to addressing the worst consequences of concentrated poverty and helping families move toward self-sufficiency. We introduce the Housing Opportunities and Services Together (HOST) demonstration, a two-generation, whole family service model that uses public and mixed-income housing as a platform for intensive, wraparound services. We describe how HOST encapsulates lessons learned from studying federal housing policies, challenges that make reversing chronic disadvantage so difficult, and our theoretical framework for fostering change. We outline HOST's research design in four sites: Chicago, New York, Portland, and Washington, D.C. (author abstract)

    Building on research in distressed public housing communities, we argue for a new approach to addressing the worst consequences of concentrated poverty and helping families move toward self-sufficiency. We introduce the Housing Opportunities and Services Together (HOST) demonstration, a two-generation, whole family service model that uses public and mixed-income housing as a platform for intensive, wraparound services. We describe how HOST encapsulates lessons learned from studying federal housing policies, challenges that make reversing chronic disadvantage so difficult, and our theoretical framework for fostering change. We outline HOST's research design in four sites: Chicago, New York, Portland, and Washington, D.C. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Katz, Irv; Key, Karen; James, Tara; French, Molly; Heit, Alexander
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Until communities offer multiple pathways to connect with ladders of opportunity, many young families headed by OSOW youth will be unable to achieve financial independence. To break the cycle of poverty, many human service organizations use two-generation approaches with “young families” (that is, families with children in which the parent is an OSOW young person ages 15–24 years). One hallmark of these two-generation approaches is the use of strategies that address the developmental needs of the young parents, their children, and the families as a whole. The National Human Services Assembly (NHSA), an association of America’s leading nonprofit human service providers, conducted an exploratory study of two-generation programs already in place within its member organizations. The Annie E. Casey Foundation (AECF) supported this effort, which sought to document quality two-generation programs and identify program elements that strengthen young families. The study eventually engaged 32 NHSA members and affiliates in sharing their knowledge about two-generation approaches and...

    Until communities offer multiple pathways to connect with ladders of opportunity, many young families headed by OSOW youth will be unable to achieve financial independence. To break the cycle of poverty, many human service organizations use two-generation approaches with “young families” (that is, families with children in which the parent is an OSOW young person ages 15–24 years). One hallmark of these two-generation approaches is the use of strategies that address the developmental needs of the young parents, their children, and the families as a whole. The National Human Services Assembly (NHSA), an association of America’s leading nonprofit human service providers, conducted an exploratory study of two-generation programs already in place within its member organizations. The Annie E. Casey Foundation (AECF) supported this effort, which sought to document quality two-generation programs and identify program elements that strengthen young families. The study eventually engaged 32 NHSA members and affiliates in sharing their knowledge about two-generation approaches and providing connections to programs that re-engage young parents in education and/or work, nurture parent-child bonds, improve children’s wellbeing, and connect families with economic, social, and other supports. This report features case studies of two-generation programs, describes elements associated with successful outcomes, and recommends future work. (author abstract)