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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1935

    This statute established the U.S. Social Security system.  It provided benefits to the disabled and unemployed and included titles relating to social supports for the elderly, the blind, women and children, as well as established the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program. 

    This statute established the U.S. Social Security system.  It provided benefits to the disabled and unemployed and included titles relating to social supports for the elderly, the blind, women and children, as well as established the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program. 

  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1977

    This statute, also known as the “Farm Bill,” included provisions relating to food stamps, nutrition, rural development and agricultural subsidies. 

    Public Law No. 95-113 (1977).

     

    This statute, also known as the “Farm Bill,” included provisions relating to food stamps, nutrition, rural development and agricultural subsidies. 

    Public Law No. 95-113 (1977).

     

  • Individual Author: Blank, Rebecca M. ; Ruggles, Patricia
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    This paper investigates dynamic patterns in the relationship between eligibility and participation in the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) and Food Stamp programs, using monthly longitudinal data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation. The results indicate that there are many relatively short eligibility spells that do not result in program participation, and end with increases in income. Participation is most likely to occur among women with lower current and future earnings opportunities, and is affected by locational and policy parameters. Those who elect to participate in these programs tend to start receiving benefits almost immediately upon becoming eligible. A substantial number of women exit these programs before their eligibility ends; among at least some of these women it is likely that unreported changes in income are occurring. In 1989, if all eligible single-parent families had participated in AFDC and Food Stamps, benefit payments in these programs would have been $13.5 billion higher. (author abstract)

    This paper investigates dynamic patterns in the relationship between eligibility and participation in the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) and Food Stamp programs, using monthly longitudinal data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation. The results indicate that there are many relatively short eligibility spells that do not result in program participation, and end with increases in income. Participation is most likely to occur among women with lower current and future earnings opportunities, and is affected by locational and policy parameters. Those who elect to participate in these programs tend to start receiving benefits almost immediately upon becoming eligible. A substantial number of women exit these programs before their eligibility ends; among at least some of these women it is likely that unreported changes in income are occurring. In 1989, if all eligible single-parent families had participated in AFDC and Food Stamps, benefit payments in these programs would have been $13.5 billion higher. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cody, Scott; Trippe, Carole
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1997

    This report presents the latest trends in Food Stamp Program (FSP) participation rates. It adds one more year of information, 1995, to the series of reports on FSP participation rates based on March Current Population Survey (CPS) data for eligibles and FSP administrative data for participants. Participation rates are calculated as the percentage of the total eligible population that participate in the FSP. Although the report focuses on changes in rates from 1988 to 1995, it also examines longer-term trends beginning with 1976. Trends in aggregate rates and trends for subgroups of the eligible population are summarized in the text that follows and described fully in the body of this report. (author abstract)

    This report presents the latest trends in Food Stamp Program (FSP) participation rates. It adds one more year of information, 1995, to the series of reports on FSP participation rates based on March Current Population Survey (CPS) data for eligibles and FSP administrative data for participants. Participation rates are calculated as the percentage of the total eligible population that participate in the FSP. Although the report focuses on changes in rates from 1988 to 1995, it also examines longer-term trends beginning with 1976. Trends in aggregate rates and trends for subgroups of the eligible population are summarized in the text that follows and described fully in the body of this report. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Stavrianos, Michael
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1997

    This report, part of the Food and Consumer Service’s series "Current Perspectives on Food Stamp Program Participation," presents the latest participation rates for the Food Stamp Program (FSP). The participation rate -- the proportion of those eligible for food stamps who actually apply for and receive benefits -- is a valuable policy tool that shows whether the program is reaching the intended population and which groups of the eligible population participate at higher or lower rates than other groups. Estimates of rates are based on Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) data for eligibles and FSP administrative data for participants.

    The current report shows that in January 1994, rates remained at or near their highest point since the beginning of the series in 1985. Between January 1992 and January 1994, the FSP participation rate for eligible households held steady at 69 percent. Participating households received 81 percent of total potential food stamp benefits in January 1994, similar...

    This report, part of the Food and Consumer Service’s series "Current Perspectives on Food Stamp Program Participation," presents the latest participation rates for the Food Stamp Program (FSP). The participation rate -- the proportion of those eligible for food stamps who actually apply for and receive benefits -- is a valuable policy tool that shows whether the program is reaching the intended population and which groups of the eligible population participate at higher or lower rates than other groups. Estimates of rates are based on Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) data for eligibles and FSP administrative data for participants.

    The current report shows that in January 1994, rates remained at or near their highest point since the beginning of the series in 1985. Between January 1992 and January 1994, the FSP participation rate for eligible households held steady at 69 percent. Participating households received 81 percent of total potential food stamp benefits in January 1994, similar to the 82 percent in January 1992. Although the overall household participation rate did not change, the participation rate for one-person households increased while the rate for larger households fell. Consequently, the person participation rate declined slightly, from 74 percent in 1992 to 71 percent in 1994. (author abstract)

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