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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1935

    This statute allocates funds to States to develop and maintain child health assistance provisions for uninsured, low-income children.

    The publication date noted for this Title reflects the original date the Social Security Act was enacted and not subsequent amendments made to the Act.

     

    This statute allocates funds to States to develop and maintain child health assistance provisions for uninsured, low-income children.

    The publication date noted for this Title reflects the original date the Social Security Act was enacted and not subsequent amendments made to the Act.

     

  • Individual Author: Lewit, Eugene M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1998

    Between 7 million and 10 million children in the United States lack health insurance. Many of these uninsured children experience difficulty obtaining needed health care. To expand health insurance coverage for children, in August 1997, Congress enacted the State Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) as part of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. CHIP, also known as Title XXI of the Social Security Act, offers states new federal funding in the form of block grants to provide "child health assistance to uninsured children in low-income families in an effective and efficient manner that is coordinated with other sources of health benefits coverage for children." The program is authorized for 10 years and is expected to provide insurance coverage for millions of currently uninsured children. Federal expenditures on child health assistance under the law are estimated to total $40 billion to $50 billion over the life of the legislation.

    The enactment of CHIP represents the most significant funding increase for children's health insurance coverage since the enactment of...

    Between 7 million and 10 million children in the United States lack health insurance. Many of these uninsured children experience difficulty obtaining needed health care. To expand health insurance coverage for children, in August 1997, Congress enacted the State Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) as part of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. CHIP, also known as Title XXI of the Social Security Act, offers states new federal funding in the form of block grants to provide "child health assistance to uninsured children in low-income families in an effective and efficient manner that is coordinated with other sources of health benefits coverage for children." The program is authorized for 10 years and is expected to provide insurance coverage for millions of currently uninsured children. Federal expenditures on child health assistance under the law are estimated to total $40 billion to $50 billion over the life of the legislation.

    The enactment of CHIP represents the most significant funding increase for children's health insurance coverage since the enactment of Medicaid in 1965. Medicaid, a means-tested entitlement program financed by the state and federal governments and administered by the states, covered approximately 17.5 million children in 1995. Medicaid covers approximately two-thirds of all poor children and one-quarter of the children in families with incomes between 100% and 200% of the federal poverty level. Despite expansion of the Medicaid program in recent years, many children in low-income families remain uninsured. CHIP is intended to address this problem.

    Although participating states must provide some funding, and states must meet a number of requirements to be eligible for federal CHIP funding, CHIP legislation gives states considerable flexibility in implementing the program. This short article reviews the basic decisions that states must make when implementing their CHIP programs and reports on the decisions that states participating in the program have made, as reflected in the plans they had submitted to the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) as of April 1, 1998. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ross, Donna Cohen
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1999

    A child's early years are the time to nurture optimum growth and development and to be on the lookout for any problems that require medical attention to prevent them from becoming major health concerns. Staff of early childhood programs, such as Head Start, child care centers, family child care homes, child care resource and referral agencies, and others, have an important role to play in assuring the health of children in their care. Parents often rely on early childhood professionals whom they know and trust for advice and help in finding health care for their children. But, obtaining medical services, especially preventive care, can be difficult, or next to impossible, without insurance. (author introduction)

    A child's early years are the time to nurture optimum growth and development and to be on the lookout for any problems that require medical attention to prevent them from becoming major health concerns. Staff of early childhood programs, such as Head Start, child care centers, family child care homes, child care resource and referral agencies, and others, have an important role to play in assuring the health of children in their care. Parents often rely on early childhood professionals whom they know and trust for advice and help in finding health care for their children. But, obtaining medical services, especially preventive care, can be difficult, or next to impossible, without insurance. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Brindis, Claire D.; Morreale, Madlyn C. ; English, Abigail
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    This article describes the particular health care needs of adolescents and explores the extent to which public health insurance programs are meeting those needs. It includes an overview of the coverage available to adolescents through Medicaid and SCHIP, how that coverage has evolved, the importance of providing comprehensive benefits to adolescents, and the need to adopt age-appropriate quality and performance measures to track progress over time. Throughout the article, recommendations are provided to strengthen health care services for adolescents, informed by the work of several national health care and policy organizations. (author introduction)

    This article describes the particular health care needs of adolescents and explores the extent to which public health insurance programs are meeting those needs. It includes an overview of the coverage available to adolescents through Medicaid and SCHIP, how that coverage has evolved, the importance of providing comprehensive benefits to adolescents, and the need to adopt age-appropriate quality and performance measures to track progress over time. Throughout the article, recommendations are provided to strengthen health care services for adolescents, informed by the work of several national health care and policy organizations. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Wolfe, Barbara; Kaplan, Thomas; Haveman, Robert; Cho, Yoonyoung
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2004

    The Wisconsin BadgerCare program, which became operational in July 1999, expanded public health insurance eligibility to both parents and children in families with incomes below 185% of the U.S. poverty line (200% for those already enrolled). This eligibility expansion was part of a federal initiative known as the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). Wisconsin was one of only four states that initially expanded coverage to parents of eligible children. In this paper, we attempt to answer the following question: To what extent does a public program with the characteristics of Wisconsin's BadgerCare program reduce the proportion of the low-income adult population without health care coverage?

    Using a coordinated set of administrative databases, we track three cohorts of mother-only families: those who were receiving cash assistance under the Wisconsin AFDC and TANF programs in September 1995, 1997, and 1999, and who subsequently left welfare. We follow these 19,201 “welfare leaver” families on a quarterly basis for up to 25 quarters, from 2 years before they...

    The Wisconsin BadgerCare program, which became operational in July 1999, expanded public health insurance eligibility to both parents and children in families with incomes below 185% of the U.S. poverty line (200% for those already enrolled). This eligibility expansion was part of a federal initiative known as the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). Wisconsin was one of only four states that initially expanded coverage to parents of eligible children. In this paper, we attempt to answer the following question: To what extent does a public program with the characteristics of Wisconsin's BadgerCare program reduce the proportion of the low-income adult population without health care coverage?

    Using a coordinated set of administrative databases, we track three cohorts of mother-only families: those who were receiving cash assistance under the Wisconsin AFDC and TANF programs in September 1995, 1997, and 1999, and who subsequently left welfare. We follow these 19,201 “welfare leaver” families on a quarterly basis for up to 25 quarters, from 2 years before they left welfare through the end of 2001, making it possible to use the labor market information and welfare history of the women in analyzing outcomes.

    We apply multiple methods to address the policy evaluation question, including probit, random effects, and two difference-in-difference strategies, and compare the results across methods. All of our estimates indicate that BadgerCare substantially increased public health care coverage for mother-only families leaving welfare. Our best estimate is that BadgerCare increased the public health care coverage of all adult leavers by about 17–25% points. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a working paper published by the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin.

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