Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Knox, Virginia; Redcross, Cindy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    For the past two decades, the nation's efforts to reform the welfare system and the child support system have often proceeded on separate tracks. However, there has been a growing realization that neither has very explicitly considered how to work with the group of men who bridge them both: low-income noncustodial fathers whose children receive welfare. The Parents' Fair Share (PFS) Demonstration, run from 1994 to 1996, was aimed at increasing the ability of these fathers to attain well-paying jobs, increase their child support payments — to increase their involvement in parenting in other ways. These reports — one examining the effectiveness of the PFS approach at increasing fathers' financial and nonfinancial involvement with their children and the other examining the effectiveness of the PFS approach at increasing fathers' employment and earnings — provide important insights into policies aimed at this key group. (author abstract)

    For the past two decades, the nation's efforts to reform the welfare system and the child support system have often proceeded on separate tracks. However, there has been a growing realization that neither has very explicitly considered how to work with the group of men who bridge them both: low-income noncustodial fathers whose children receive welfare. The Parents' Fair Share (PFS) Demonstration, run from 1994 to 1996, was aimed at increasing the ability of these fathers to attain well-paying jobs, increase their child support payments — to increase their involvement in parenting in other ways. These reports — one examining the effectiveness of the PFS approach at increasing fathers' financial and nonfinancial involvement with their children and the other examining the effectiveness of the PFS approach at increasing fathers' employment and earnings — provide important insights into policies aimed at this key group. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Clayton, Obie; Mincy, Ronald; Blankenhorn, David
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2003

    The majority of African American children live in homes without their fathers, but the proportion of African American children living in intact, two-parent families has risen significantly since 1995. Black Fathers in Contemporary American Society looks at father absence from two sides, offering an in-depth analysis of how the absence of African American fathers affects their children, their relationships, and society as a whole, while countering the notion that father absence and family fragmentation within the African American community is inevitable.

    Editors Obie Clayton, Ronald B. Mincy, and David Blankenhorn lead a diverse group of contributors encompassing a range of disciplines and ideological perspectives who all agree that father absence among black families is one of the most pressing social problems today. In part I, the contributors offer possible explanations for the decline in marriage among African American families. William Julius Wilson believes that many men who live in the inner city no longer consider marriage an option because their limited economic...

    The majority of African American children live in homes without their fathers, but the proportion of African American children living in intact, two-parent families has risen significantly since 1995. Black Fathers in Contemporary American Society looks at father absence from two sides, offering an in-depth analysis of how the absence of African American fathers affects their children, their relationships, and society as a whole, while countering the notion that father absence and family fragmentation within the African American community is inevitable.

    Editors Obie Clayton, Ronald B. Mincy, and David Blankenhorn lead a diverse group of contributors encompassing a range of disciplines and ideological perspectives who all agree that father absence among black families is one of the most pressing social problems today. In part I, the contributors offer possible explanations for the decline in marriage among African American families. William Julius Wilson believes that many men who live in the inner city no longer consider marriage an option because their limited economic prospects do not enable them to provide for a family. Part II considers marriage from an economic perspective, emphasizing that it is in part a wealth-producing institution. Maggie Gallagher points out that married people earn, invest, and save more than single people, and that when marriage rates are low in a community, it is the children who suffer most. In part III, the contributors discuss policies to reduce absentee fatherhood. Wornie Reed demonstrates how public health interventions, such as personal development workshops and work-related skill-building services, can be used to address the causes of fatherlessness. Wade Horn illustrates the positive results achieved by fatherhood programs, especially when held early in a man's life. In the last chapter, Enola Aird notes that from 1995 to 2000, the proportion of African American children living in two-parent, married couple homes rose from 34.8 to 38.9 percent; a significant increase indicating the possible reversal of the long-term shift toward black family fragmentation.

    Black Fathers in Contemporary American Society provides an in-depth look at a problem affecting millions of children while offering proof that the trend of father absence is not irrevocable. (author abstract) 

    Chapter 1: The Woes of the Inner-City African American Father - William Julius Wilson

    Chapter 2: Marriage and Fatherhood in the Lives of African American Men - Steven Nock

    Chapter 3: The Marriage Mystery: Marriage, Assets, and the Expectations of African American Families - Ronald Mincy and Hillard Pouncy

    Chapter 4: The Marriage Gap: How and Why Marriage Creates Wealth and Boosts the Well-Being of Adults - Maggie Gallagher

    Chapter 5: The Effects of Crime and Imprisonment on Family Formation - Obie Clayton and Joan Moore

    Chapter 6: Building a Fatherhood Movement in South Carolina - Barbara Morrison-Rodriguez

    Chapter 7: Fatherlessness in African American Families: Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Prevention - Wornie Reed

    Chapter 8: Is it Working? Early Evaluations of Fatherhood-Renewal Programs - Wade Horn

    Chapter 9: Making the Wounded Whole: Marriage as Civil Right and Civic Responsibility - Enola Aird 

     

  • Individual Author: Fuger, Kathryn L.; Abel, Michael B.; Duke, Dianna L.; Newkirk, Melissa K.; Arnold, Jodi D.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    Strengthening Families and Fatherhood: Children of Fathers in the Criminal Justice System, otherwise known as Fathers for Life – A Head Start Father Involvement Model, developed as an Innovation and Improvement Project (IIP), funded through the Office of Head Start. Fathers for Life – A Head Start Father Involvement Model (referred to in this document as Fathers for Life) addressed the priority area of Strengthening Families/Fatherhood of the President’s Head Start initiatives. Office of Head Start first awarded Missouri Department of Social Services Family Support Division (FSD) funding to develop a sound logic model and theory of change during a 9-month Planning Phase. During the 3-year Implementation Phase that followed, the logic model continued to develop as the project entered early stages of implementation. This report summarizes the project model and describes the results of these efforts in the state of Missouri, in the local communities in which it was instituted, and in the lives of the fathers who participated. Some concluding comments...

    Strengthening Families and Fatherhood: Children of Fathers in the Criminal Justice System, otherwise known as Fathers for Life – A Head Start Father Involvement Model, developed as an Innovation and Improvement Project (IIP), funded through the Office of Head Start. Fathers for Life – A Head Start Father Involvement Model (referred to in this document as Fathers for Life) addressed the priority area of Strengthening Families/Fatherhood of the President’s Head Start initiatives. Office of Head Start first awarded Missouri Department of Social Services Family Support Division (FSD) funding to develop a sound logic model and theory of change during a 9-month Planning Phase. During the 3-year Implementation Phase that followed, the logic model continued to develop as the project entered early stages of implementation. This report summarizes the project model and describes the results of these efforts in the state of Missouri, in the local communities in which it was instituted, and in the lives of the fathers who participated. Some concluding comments summarize the initiative, pose additional questions, and give suggestions for next steps. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Malm, Karin; Zielewski, Erica; Chen, Henry
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    In 2006, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published the results of a study regarding child welfare agencies efforts to identify, locate, and involve nonresident fathers of children in foster care. That study, conducted by the Urban Institute under contract to HHS's Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation and in cooperation with the Children's Bureau in the Administration for Children and Families, was based on telephone interviews with caseworkers in four states (Arizona, Massachusetts, Minnesota, and Tennessee) about specific children in their caseloads. The findings of that study are described briefly below and are presented in more detail in the study's full report, What about the Dads?  Child Welfare Agencies Efforts to Identify Locate and Involve Nonresident Fathers.[1] Those findings are primarily descriptive in nature. Because all children in the sample were in foster care at the time the caseworker interviews were conducted, the original study could not examine the relationship between nonresident father involvement and case...

    In 2006, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published the results of a study regarding child welfare agencies efforts to identify, locate, and involve nonresident fathers of children in foster care. That study, conducted by the Urban Institute under contract to HHS's Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation and in cooperation with the Children's Bureau in the Administration for Children and Families, was based on telephone interviews with caseworkers in four states (Arizona, Massachusetts, Minnesota, and Tennessee) about specific children in their caseloads. The findings of that study are described briefly below and are presented in more detail in the study's full report, What about the Dads?  Child Welfare Agencies Efforts to Identify Locate and Involve Nonresident Fathers.[1] Those findings are primarily descriptive in nature. Because all children in the sample were in foster care at the time the caseworker interviews were conducted, the original study could not examine the relationship between nonresident father involvement and case outcomes. By design, none of the cases had outcomes when the original data collection occurred.

    This report, using administrative data supplied by each state that participated in the original study, examines case outcomes for the children whose caseworkers were interviewed previously. At the time data were extracted for this follow-up analysis, approximately two years had passed since the original interviews, and most of the children had exited foster care. These analyses use information from the original survey about whether the father had been identified and contacted by the child welfare agency and about the fathers level of involvement with their children, combined with administrative data on case outcomes two years following the interviews, to explore three research questions: (1) Is nonresident father involvement associated with case length? (2) Is nonresident father involvement associated with foster care discharge outcomes? and (3) Is nonresident father involvement associated with subsequent child maltreatment allegations? Before presenting current findings, we provide a brief overview of the study sample and findings from the prior caseworker survey, and describe the current study's methodology and limitations. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Economic Development Research Group
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    This report presents a multi-method evaluation of the InsideOut Dad™ program in three Community Education Centers (CEC) Residential Reentry Centers in New Jersey. The current evaluation includes both quantitative and qualitative data in the form of participant surveys, institutional data collection, participant interviews, and stakeholder interviews. These methods are used to determine if the program has had an impact across a series of outcome measures...

    This report is presented in several sections. The remainder of this section provides a concise review of the research on the effects of parental incarceration and programs for fathers in prisons. The second section contains a brief summary of the components to the InsideOut Dad™ program and discusses two previous evaluations of the program conducted in Maryland and Ohio. The third section rephrases the purpose of the current evaluation. The fourth section details the methodology utilized within this evaluation. Data collection and analysis procedures are described in detail. In the fifth section, the quantitative results...

    This report presents a multi-method evaluation of the InsideOut Dad™ program in three Community Education Centers (CEC) Residential Reentry Centers in New Jersey. The current evaluation includes both quantitative and qualitative data in the form of participant surveys, institutional data collection, participant interviews, and stakeholder interviews. These methods are used to determine if the program has had an impact across a series of outcome measures...

    This report is presented in several sections. The remainder of this section provides a concise review of the research on the effects of parental incarceration and programs for fathers in prisons. The second section contains a brief summary of the components to the InsideOut Dad™ program and discusses two previous evaluations of the program conducted in Maryland and Ohio. The third section rephrases the purpose of the current evaluation. The fourth section details the methodology utilized within this evaluation. Data collection and analysis procedures are described in detail. In the fifth section, the quantitative results are presented and analyzed from survey and institutional data. The sixth section introduces the qualitative results of the study from interviews with participants and stakeholders. The seventh section describes the most important limitations associated with the study. The eighth section offers a conclusion that reiterates the main findings and implications of the current evaluation. The final section provides recommendations from the study. (author introduction)

    The original hyperlink to this resource has been removed by the publisher. You may obtain a single use PDF by emailing the SSRC at ssrc@opressrc.org.

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2000 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations