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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Hayes, Eileen ; Sherwood, Kay
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2000

    The Responsible Fatherhood Curriculum is intended to assist fathers in more effectively fulfilling their roles as parents, partners, and workers. It was developed over a number of years' use in the peer support groups that were the "glue" of the Parents' Fair Share Demonstration for low-income noncustodial fathers. Anyone operating a program for fathers -- or even for mothers -- will find the curriculum a rich source of useful, down-to-earth material organized into 20 sessions on dealing with issues such as male-female relationships, fathers as providers, managing conflict and anger (on and off the job), and race and racism. The curriculum materials are contained in 21 files in PDF format, each containing the material for one session of the curriculum. Use the links in the Contents section below to access the session files. Each session has bookmarks to specific activities within the session that can be accessed using the "show navigation pane" option on the Acrobat Reader toolbar. (author abstract)

    The Responsible Fatherhood Curriculum is intended to assist fathers in more effectively fulfilling their roles as parents, partners, and workers. It was developed over a number of years' use in the peer support groups that were the "glue" of the Parents' Fair Share Demonstration for low-income noncustodial fathers. Anyone operating a program for fathers -- or even for mothers -- will find the curriculum a rich source of useful, down-to-earth material organized into 20 sessions on dealing with issues such as male-female relationships, fathers as providers, managing conflict and anger (on and off the job), and race and racism. The curriculum materials are contained in 21 files in PDF format, each containing the material for one session of the curriculum. Use the links in the Contents section below to access the session files. Each session has bookmarks to specific activities within the session that can be accessed using the "show navigation pane" option on the Acrobat Reader toolbar. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Curran, Laura
    Year: 2003

    In recent years social welfare policies and practices have increasingly addressed men's roles as fathers. The landmark welfare reform legislation, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA) (P.L. 104-193), contains significant revisions in child support legislation. Rapid growth has occurred in the number of social services programs working with fathers. This article introduces social workers to these policy and practice initiatives. Through a critical review of research and descriptive programmatic material, this article considers the mixed implications of these policy and practice interventions for family well-being and recommends future directions for policy and practice.(author abstract)

    In recent years social welfare policies and practices have increasingly addressed men's roles as fathers. The landmark welfare reform legislation, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA) (P.L. 104-193), contains significant revisions in child support legislation. Rapid growth has occurred in the number of social services programs working with fathers. This article introduces social workers to these policy and practice initiatives. Through a critical review of research and descriptive programmatic material, this article considers the mixed implications of these policy and practice interventions for family well-being and recommends future directions for policy and practice.(author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Tift, Neil
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2011

    Home visits provide a unique opportunity to assess parents’ child-rearing skills and to provide targeted services to assist responsible adults in growing healthy families. As home visitors, you are aware of some of the barriers that you must confront when attempting to achieve these goals.

    Often one of those barriers is the reluctance of fathers and men in families to recognize the importance of their participation in home visits. This tends to be true across a wide range of cultures, income levels, and educational backgrounds.

    In order to engage fathers and men in families more fully, it is important to utilize some simple techniques that tend to enhance father involvement. (author abstract)

    Home visits provide a unique opportunity to assess parents’ child-rearing skills and to provide targeted services to assist responsible adults in growing healthy families. As home visitors, you are aware of some of the barriers that you must confront when attempting to achieve these goals.

    Often one of those barriers is the reluctance of fathers and men in families to recognize the importance of their participation in home visits. This tends to be true across a wide range of cultures, income levels, and educational backgrounds.

    In order to engage fathers and men in families more fully, it is important to utilize some simple techniques that tend to enhance father involvement. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Dorsey, Bernie
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2011

    It seems as though new parenthood can be pretty stressful. Just ask anyone who has had a baby in the last, say, 50 years. As quickly as those first few weeks pass, while you are in the moment, it feels as though it will be an eternity. New things come along that strive to make life easier for new dads and moms. There are neverending lists of products that we somehow can just not live without or a new technique that promises to be the answer to all that we desire, which is usually sleep. But the basic things are usually all that babies really need, and the most basic is a partnership where their mom and dad share as equally as possible in the care and nurturing of their new child. However, it is impossible to be a competent partner in caring for a new baby if you know little or nothing about infants. Conscious Fathering, a program developed in 1999, gives expectant fathers a chance to play a little catchup (and, in some cases, a lot of catchup!) in that area. It helps men to not only be better prepared to meet the challenges of new fatherhood, but to parent with mom in partnership...

    It seems as though new parenthood can be pretty stressful. Just ask anyone who has had a baby in the last, say, 50 years. As quickly as those first few weeks pass, while you are in the moment, it feels as though it will be an eternity. New things come along that strive to make life easier for new dads and moms. There are neverending lists of products that we somehow can just not live without or a new technique that promises to be the answer to all that we desire, which is usually sleep. But the basic things are usually all that babies really need, and the most basic is a partnership where their mom and dad share as equally as possible in the care and nurturing of their new child. However, it is impossible to be a competent partner in caring for a new baby if you know little or nothing about infants. Conscious Fathering, a program developed in 1999, gives expectant fathers a chance to play a little catchup (and, in some cases, a lot of catchup!) in that area. It helps men to not only be better prepared to meet the challenges of new fatherhood, but to parent with mom in partnership. (author introduction) 

  • Individual Author: Office of Child Support Enforcement
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2011

    The Promoting Child Well-Being & Family Self-Sufficiency Fact Sheet Series discusses how and why the child support program provides innovative services to families across six interrelated areas to assure that parents have the tools and resources they need to support their children and be positively involved in raising them. This fact sheet focuses on how the child support program and military and veterans organizations can work together to help parents who serve our country meet their responsibilities to their children and be the parents they want to be. (Author introduction)

    The Promoting Child Well-Being & Family Self-Sufficiency Fact Sheet Series discusses how and why the child support program provides innovative services to families across six interrelated areas to assure that parents have the tools and resources they need to support their children and be positively involved in raising them. This fact sheet focuses on how the child support program and military and veterans organizations can work together to help parents who serve our country meet their responsibilities to their children and be the parents they want to be. (Author introduction)

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