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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Mincy, Ronald B. ; Grossbard, Shoshana; Huang, Chien-Chung
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2005

    This paper sheds light on the determinants of choice between four co-parenting arrangements: father absence, father’s non-residential visitations, cohabitation, and marriage. In our theoretical framework, we use an adaptation of Becker’s Demand & Supply (D&S) model of marriage and a hierarchy of co-parenting arrangements--ranked in terms of degree of fathers’ involvement in the lives of mother or child--as an observable price measure for women’s work as mothers. We predict effects on co-parenting choice of factors such as welfare benefits, sex ratios, income, black versus white, or education, and black/white differences in these effects. We test our predictions with data from the Fragile Families and Child-Wellbeing Survey. Our findings include (1) the larger the grant amount in the state where the mother resides, the more it is likely that fathers will have some contact with their children, and the more it is likely that fathers will cohabit with the mothers; (2) fathers who have more children with other women are less likely to have contact with a given woman’s children...

    This paper sheds light on the determinants of choice between four co-parenting arrangements: father absence, father’s non-residential visitations, cohabitation, and marriage. In our theoretical framework, we use an adaptation of Becker’s Demand & Supply (D&S) model of marriage and a hierarchy of co-parenting arrangements--ranked in terms of degree of fathers’ involvement in the lives of mother or child--as an observable price measure for women’s work as mothers. We predict effects on co-parenting choice of factors such as welfare benefits, sex ratios, income, black versus white, or education, and black/white differences in these effects. We test our predictions with data from the Fragile Families and Child-Wellbeing Survey. Our findings include (1) the larger the grant amount in the state where the mother resides, the more it is likely that fathers will have some contact with their children, and the more it is likely that fathers will cohabit with the mothers; (2) fathers who have more children with other women are less likely to have contact with a given woman’s children, but this discouraging effect of men’s other children is smaller for blacks than for whites; and (3) employment in the last year reduces the likelihood that a white mother is married to her child’s father, while increasing that likelihood among black mothers. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Knox, Virginia; Cowan, Philip A.; Cowan, Carolyn Pape; Bildner, Elana
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2011

    As described in earlier articles, children whose parents have higher incomes and education levels are more likely to grow up in stable two-parent households than their economically disadvantaged counterparts. The widening gaps in fathers’ involvement in parenting and in the quality and stability of parents’ relationships may reinforce disparities in outcomes for the next generation. This article reviews evidence about the effectiveness of two strategies to strengthen fathers’ involvement and family relationships—fatherhood programs aimed at disadvantaged noncustodial fathers and relationship skills programs for parents who are together. Fatherhood programs have shown some efficacy in increasing child support payments, while some relationship skills approaches have shown benefits for the couples’ relationship quality, coparenting skills, fathers’ engagement in parenting, and children’s well-being. The research suggests that parents’ relationship with each other should be a fundamental consideration in future programs aimed at increasing low-income fathers’ involvement with their...

    As described in earlier articles, children whose parents have higher incomes and education levels are more likely to grow up in stable two-parent households than their economically disadvantaged counterparts. The widening gaps in fathers’ involvement in parenting and in the quality and stability of parents’ relationships may reinforce disparities in outcomes for the next generation. This article reviews evidence about the effectiveness of two strategies to strengthen fathers’ involvement and family relationships—fatherhood programs aimed at disadvantaged noncustodial fathers and relationship skills programs for parents who are together. Fatherhood programs have shown some efficacy in increasing child support payments, while some relationship skills approaches have shown benefits for the couples’ relationship quality, coparenting skills, fathers’ engagement in parenting, and children’s well-being. The research suggests that parents’ relationship with each other should be a fundamental consideration in future programs aimed at increasing low-income fathers’ involvement with their children. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fucello, Mark; O'Dell, Ben; Edin, Kathryn; Nelson, Timothy; Pate, David
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    In recent decades, policymakers have invested in responsible fatherhood programs in light of emerging research that strengthening parenting among fathers promotes positive child outcomes. This session will focus on how fatherhood programs and policies can better serve fathers, children, and their families. The panelists will discuss recent research on the changing dynamics of fatherhood in relationships and families, and opportunities for promoting father-child bonds among low-income men and boys of color. Ben O’Dell (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) will moderate this panel. Panelists are:

    • Kathryn Edin (Johns Hopkins University)

    • Timothy Nelson (Johns Hopkins University)

    • David Pate (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) (conference program description)

    This presentation was given at the 2014 Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (WREC).

    In recent decades, policymakers have invested in responsible fatherhood programs in light of emerging research that strengthening parenting among fathers promotes positive child outcomes. This session will focus on how fatherhood programs and policies can better serve fathers, children, and their families. The panelists will discuss recent research on the changing dynamics of fatherhood in relationships and families, and opportunities for promoting father-child bonds among low-income men and boys of color. Ben O’Dell (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) will moderate this panel. Panelists are:

    • Kathryn Edin (Johns Hopkins University)

    • Timothy Nelson (Johns Hopkins University)

    • David Pate (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) (conference program description)

    This presentation was given at the 2014 Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (WREC).

  • Individual Author: Tinsman, Penny; Shepherd, Matthew
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    This presentation describes a conceptual framework for integrating community-based workforce strategies into healthy marriage and responsible fatherhood programs

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    This presentation describes a conceptual framework for integrating community-based workforce strategies into healthy marriage and responsible fatherhood programs

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

  • Individual Author: Solomon, Amy; Lacina, Barbara; Tijerina, Ron; Tijerina, Catherine; Fontaine, Jocelyn
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes efforts to support reentering fathers, such as: 1) efforts of the Federal Interagency Reentry Council; 2) partnerships with the National Child Support Program; and 3) the TYRO suite of programs provided through The RIDGE Project, Inc.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes efforts to support reentering fathers, such as: 1) efforts of the Federal Interagency Reentry Council; 2) partnerships with the National Child Support Program; and 3) the TYRO suite of programs provided through The RIDGE Project, Inc.

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