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  • Individual Author: Allen, Sarah; Daly, Kerry
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    In the year 2002, we compiled the first summary of the research that examined the impact of father involvement on children’s developmental outcomes, the co-parenting relationship, and development of fathers themselves. In 2007, we updated this review by examining approximately150 new research studies in these areas. Although this does not include all of the research on fathering conducted during this period, it does provide an update of key published works on father involvement. In general, the research results reported in 2002 have been strengthened by additional research that we have examined in this period. One of the challenges of looking at the effects of father involvement is to disentangle father involvement from the effects of social class and family structure. We also include here new and emerging findings that provide deepening insight into the complex phenomenon of fathering.

    This document presents an updated overview of the key trends in the father involvement literature. While we are unable to provide methodological detail in such a succinct summary, we...

    In the year 2002, we compiled the first summary of the research that examined the impact of father involvement on children’s developmental outcomes, the co-parenting relationship, and development of fathers themselves. In 2007, we updated this review by examining approximately150 new research studies in these areas. Although this does not include all of the research on fathering conducted during this period, it does provide an update of key published works on father involvement. In general, the research results reported in 2002 have been strengthened by additional research that we have examined in this period. One of the challenges of looking at the effects of father involvement is to disentangle father involvement from the effects of social class and family structure. We also include here new and emerging findings that provide deepening insight into the complex phenomenon of fathering.

    This document presents an updated overview of the key trends in the father involvement literature. While we are unable to provide methodological detail in such a succinct summary, we endeavoured to compile as accurately as possible, reliable research results that support these trends. It is clear from the research that father involvement has enormous implications for men on their own path of adult development, for their wives and partners in the coparenting relationship and, most importantly, for their children in terms of social, emotional, physical, and cognitive development.(author abstract)

     

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