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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1974

    This statute created the Community Development Block Grant program merging numerous categorical programs into one block of community development funds distributed each year by formula, accounting for population and measures of distress including poverty, age of housing, housing overcrowding, and growth lag. 

    Public Law No.93-383  (1974). 

     

    This statute created the Community Development Block Grant program merging numerous categorical programs into one block of community development funds distributed each year by formula, accounting for population and measures of distress including poverty, age of housing, housing overcrowding, and growth lag. 

    Public Law No.93-383  (1974). 

     

  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1987

    This statute provided a range of services to homeless people, including supportive housing programs, emergency shelter programs and continuum of care programs.

    Public Law No. 100-77 (1987).

    This statute provided a range of services to homeless people, including supportive housing programs, emergency shelter programs and continuum of care programs.

    Public Law No. 100-77 (1987).

  • Individual Author: Gilderbloom, John ; Rosentraub, Mark
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1990

    Programs and proposals for socially integrating disabled and elderly people have, traditionally, not received a great deal of support. To a limited extent this is changing. A number of social and political factors produced a unique task force in the Houston area which sought to capitalize on the depressed state of real estate and develop independent living situations for disabled people. A study detailed the extent to which large urban areas like Houston become "invisible jails" for the handicapped. The elders and the disabled are often trapped in restrictive living units and are unable to gain access to a city's resources by transportation systems not adapted for them. Several opportunities for creating a barrier free environment were found in an over-built residential sector. The responsibilities of urban areas for providing opportunities for all residents are considered. (author abstract)

    Programs and proposals for socially integrating disabled and elderly people have, traditionally, not received a great deal of support. To a limited extent this is changing. A number of social and political factors produced a unique task force in the Houston area which sought to capitalize on the depressed state of real estate and develop independent living situations for disabled people. A study detailed the extent to which large urban areas like Houston become "invisible jails" for the handicapped. The elders and the disabled are often trapped in restrictive living units and are unable to gain access to a city's resources by transportation systems not adapted for them. Several opportunities for creating a barrier free environment were found in an over-built residential sector. The responsibilities of urban areas for providing opportunities for all residents are considered. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mulroy, Elizabeth
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1990

    Federal cutbacks in affordable housing programs during the Reagan years and a reduced supply of affordable rental units in the private market have created a housing crisis that is injurious to households headed by single mothers. Based on research conducted with low-income single mothers trying to participate in the federally funded Section 8 Rental Assistance Program, this study found that those most likely to receive program benefits were white single mothers with small families who had limited aspirations for better housing. Minority women with multiple unmet housing needs and high aspirations for relocating to a better living environment were least likely to receive program benefits. Social workers trained in community organizing, planning, social administration and policy practice have the skills to assume leadership in the design of more effective and equitable affordable housing policies, programs and implementation strategies to improve single mothers' access to the affordable housing of their choice. (author abstract)

    Federal cutbacks in affordable housing programs during the Reagan years and a reduced supply of affordable rental units in the private market have created a housing crisis that is injurious to households headed by single mothers. Based on research conducted with low-income single mothers trying to participate in the federally funded Section 8 Rental Assistance Program, this study found that those most likely to receive program benefits were white single mothers with small families who had limited aspirations for better housing. Minority women with multiple unmet housing needs and high aspirations for relocating to a better living environment were least likely to receive program benefits. Social workers trained in community organizing, planning, social administration and policy practice have the skills to assume leadership in the design of more effective and equitable affordable housing policies, programs and implementation strategies to improve single mothers' access to the affordable housing of their choice. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Burt, Martha
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1992

    Often described as an emergency, homelessness in America is becoming a chronic condition that reflects an overall decline in the nation's standard of living and the general state of the economy. This is the disturbing conclusion drawn by Martha Burt in Over the Edge, a timely book that takes a clear-eyed look at the astonishing surge in the homeless population during the 1980s.

    Assembling and analyzing data from 147 U.S. cities, Burt documents the increase in homelessness and proposes a comprehensive explanation of its causes, incorporating economic, personal, and policy determinants. Her unique research answers many provocative questions: Why did homelessness continue to spiral even after economic conditions improved in 1983? Why is it significantly greater in cities with both high poverty rates and high per capita income? What can be done about the problem?

    Burt points to the significant catalysts of homelessness—the decline of manufacturing jobs in the inner city, the increased cost of living, the tight rental housing market, diminished household income, and...

    Often described as an emergency, homelessness in America is becoming a chronic condition that reflects an overall decline in the nation's standard of living and the general state of the economy. This is the disturbing conclusion drawn by Martha Burt in Over the Edge, a timely book that takes a clear-eyed look at the astonishing surge in the homeless population during the 1980s.

    Assembling and analyzing data from 147 U.S. cities, Burt documents the increase in homelessness and proposes a comprehensive explanation of its causes, incorporating economic, personal, and policy determinants. Her unique research answers many provocative questions: Why did homelessness continue to spiral even after economic conditions improved in 1983? Why is it significantly greater in cities with both high poverty rates and high per capita income? What can be done about the problem?

    Burt points to the significant catalysts of homelessness—the decline of manufacturing jobs in the inner city, the increased cost of living, the tight rental housing market, diminished household income, and reductions in public benefit programs—all of which exert pressures on the more vulnerable of the extremely poor. She looks at the special problems facing the homeless, including the growing number of mentally ill and chemically dependent individuals, and explains why certain groups—minorities and low-skilled men, single men and women, and families headed by women—are at greatest risk of becoming homeless. Burt's analysis reveals that homelessness arises from no single factor, but is instead perpetuated by pivotal interactions between external social and economic conditions and personal vulnerabilities.

    From an understanding of these interactions, Over the Edge builds lucid, realistic recommendations for policymakers struggling to alleviate a situation of grave consequence for our entire society. (author abstract) 

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