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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1990

    This statute includes within it the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act, which assists working families with the cost of providing child care. It was a primary source of federal funding to help low-income families gain access to child care and after-school programs. 

    Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1990: Public Law No.101-508 (1990).

     

    This statute includes within it the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act, which assists working families with the cost of providing child care. It was a primary source of federal funding to help low-income families gain access to child care and after-school programs. 

    Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1990: Public Law No.101-508 (1990).

     

  • Individual Author: Blau, David
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1991

    This volume presents results from state-of-the-art economic analyses of child care issues in a form accessible to the nonspecialist. The chapters have been written by economists who are engaged in path-breaking work on child care. The results of this research have to date typically been published in academic economics journals or in technical reports to sponsoring agencies. The authors of the chapters in this book have recognized the need to disseminate their findings to a wide audience and have consequently written papers that report their research results in a nontechnical way, but without sacrificing their key insights. The goal of the volume is to bring basic principles and findings of the economic analysis of child care into wide currency among groups and individuals with a strong interest in and knowledge of child care issues but without the expertise to conduct or evaluate sophisticated economic research. Economists with an interest in child care should also find the volume useful. (author abstract)

    Table of Contents

    Introduction - David Blau...

    This volume presents results from state-of-the-art economic analyses of child care issues in a form accessible to the nonspecialist. The chapters have been written by economists who are engaged in path-breaking work on child care. The results of this research have to date typically been published in academic economics journals or in technical reports to sponsoring agencies. The authors of the chapters in this book have recognized the need to disseminate their findings to a wide audience and have consequently written papers that report their research results in a nontechnical way, but without sacrificing their key insights. The goal of the volume is to bring basic principles and findings of the economic analysis of child care into wide currency among groups and individuals with a strong interest in and knowledge of child care issues but without the expertise to conduct or evaluate sophisticated economic research. Economists with an interest in child care should also find the volume useful. (author abstract)

    Table of Contents

    Introduction - David Blau

    Chapter 2: Child Care Policy and Research: An Economist's Perspective - Phillip Robins and William Prosser

    Chapter 3: Public Policy and the Supply of Child Care Services - James Walker and Deborah Phillips

    Chapter 4: The Importance of Child Care Costs to Women's Decision Making - Rachel Connelly and Sandra Hofferth

    Chapter 5: Quality, Cost, and Parental Choice of Child Care - Ellen Eisker and Rebecca Maynard

    Chapter 6: The Quality of Child Care: An Economic Perspective - David Blau 

  • Individual Author: Zigler, Edward F.; Finn-Stevenson, Matia
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    Ensuring the availability of high-quality, affordable child care to all families who need it is a goal of national importance. The authors suggest that a comprehensive financing and service delivery system for child care is needed to achieve this goal, and the system should ideally be grounded in an existing institution, already present in every community—the public school. The linkage of child care with the public education system would eliminate the false distinction between child care and education, and would create a universally accessible system of child care services for children. The School of the 21st Century is an example of such a system. Initially conceptualized by Zigler, it has now been implemented in 400 schools across 13 states, with the leadership and direction of Finn-Stevenson.

    This article describes how school districts that have implemented the program employ a mixture of parent fees and local, state, federal, and private dollars to fund it, and then proposes an ideal financing model for the program. In the ideal model, the same mix of funding sources...

    Ensuring the availability of high-quality, affordable child care to all families who need it is a goal of national importance. The authors suggest that a comprehensive financing and service delivery system for child care is needed to achieve this goal, and the system should ideally be grounded in an existing institution, already present in every community—the public school. The linkage of child care with the public education system would eliminate the false distinction between child care and education, and would create a universally accessible system of child care services for children. The School of the 21st Century is an example of such a system. Initially conceptualized by Zigler, it has now been implemented in 400 schools across 13 states, with the leadership and direction of Finn-Stevenson.

    This article describes how school districts that have implemented the program employ a mixture of parent fees and local, state, federal, and private dollars to fund it, and then proposes an ideal financing model for the program. In the ideal model, the same mix of funding sources would be retained, but a per-pupil expenditure of about $9,000 per year is advocated to deliver child care and other social services to three- and four-year-olds. Funds for initial start-up could be derived from reallocation of existing dollars, especially state prekindergarten programs, but eventually new funds would be needed to support ongoing operations. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Stoney, Louise; Greenberg, Mark H.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    The United States does not have a single coordinated child care system. Instead, child care and early education involve a complex mix of private and public funding for an array of formal and informal, regulated and unregulated, primarily educational and primarily custodial care arrangements. Public funding may be federal, state, or local and may be in the form of tax relief, vouchers or reimbursements to families, contractual arrangements with providers, or direct provision of services. This article describes the principal sources of public and private funding for child care, highlights some of the key issues resulting from the current fragmented funding approach, and suggests some possible consequences if pending federal legislation restructuring several public funding programs is enacted. (Author introduction)

    The United States does not have a single coordinated child care system. Instead, child care and early education involve a complex mix of private and public funding for an array of formal and informal, regulated and unregulated, primarily educational and primarily custodial care arrangements. Public funding may be federal, state, or local and may be in the form of tax relief, vouchers or reimbursements to families, contractual arrangements with providers, or direct provision of services. This article describes the principal sources of public and private funding for child care, highlights some of the key issues resulting from the current fragmented funding approach, and suggests some possible consequences if pending federal legislation restructuring several public funding programs is enacted. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Cohen, Abby J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    Over the past 60 years, the federal government has provided funding for child care and early education programs in fits and starts. Funding has fluctuated in amount and purpose, with the result that today's child care financing system is a confused collection of funding streams with no uniform goals, standards, or administrative structure. This article traces the history of federal funding for child care and early education programs in the United States and examines how the values of American society have shaped the federal funding of child care and early education services. (author abstract)

    Over the past 60 years, the federal government has provided funding for child care and early education programs in fits and starts. Funding has fluctuated in amount and purpose, with the result that today's child care financing system is a confused collection of funding streams with no uniform goals, standards, or administrative structure. This article traces the history of federal funding for child care and early education programs in the United States and examines how the values of American society have shaped the federal funding of child care and early education services. (author abstract)

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