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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Tompkins, Arnold R.
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1996

    Ohio has established itself as a state with a strong desire to move from a system of public assistance that focuses on the issuance of benefits to a system of support that rewards people for obtaining employment and achieving self-sufficiency.

    To that end, the state embarked last year on a comprehensive welfare reform initiative that promotes independence, dignity, sound families, and the value of personal responsibility. At its core is Ohio House Bill 167, signed into law on August 16, 1995, by Gov. George V. Voinovich (R), which supports families by removing the barriers they may face as they move from welfare to independence. Our welfare initiative, OhioFirst, represents a movement toward a total integration of our state programs. We want to provide our low-income citizens with a comprehensive system that enables them to move from welfare to work and from low-skill jobs to higher-paying jobs.

    The time is right for...

    Ohio has established itself as a state with a strong desire to move from a system of public assistance that focuses on the issuance of benefits to a system of support that rewards people for obtaining employment and achieving self-sufficiency.

    To that end, the state embarked last year on a comprehensive welfare reform initiative that promotes independence, dignity, sound families, and the value of personal responsibility. At its core is Ohio House Bill 167, signed into law on August 16, 1995, by Gov. George V. Voinovich (R), which supports families by removing the barriers they may face as they move from welfare to independence. Our welfare initiative, OhioFirst, represents a movement toward a total integration of our state programs. We want to provide our low-income citizens with a comprehensive system that enables them to move from welfare to work and from low-skill jobs to higher-paying jobs.

    The time is right for change. In 1995, the average annual unemployment rate in Ohio fell to its lowest level in more than two decades. For the third consecutive year, Ohio led the nation in Site Selection magazine's tracking of new facilities and plant expansion. Our welfare reform effort must unite our citizens who are seeking jobs with employers who are in search of workers. By doing so, we will move people off welfare and provide a skilled workforce to meet the needs of our employers. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Johnson, Clifford; Lopez, Ana Carricchi
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1997

    A comprehensive examination of research findings on past and current efforts to create publicly-funded jobs for disadvantaged adults and youth. This synthesis of the research literature presents six lessons to guide the development of future job creation efforts. These lessons are supplemented by two-page summaries of findings from evaluations of ten particularly prominent or interesting job creation models and a list of selected research references.
    (author abstract)

    A comprehensive examination of research findings on past and current efforts to create publicly-funded jobs for disadvantaged adults and youth. This synthesis of the research literature presents six lessons to guide the development of future job creation efforts. These lessons are supplemented by two-page summaries of findings from evaluations of ten particularly prominent or interesting job creation models and a list of selected research references.
    (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Clagett, Craig A.
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1997

    In an effort to reevaluate employment preparation in community college curricula, a review of recent research was conducted to identify the most valued skills in today's workforce. Among the abilities desired by today's employers are: (1) knowing how to learn; (2) competence in reading, writing, and computation; (3) effective listening and oral communication skills; (4) adaptability through creative thinking and problem solving; (5) personal management with strong self esteem and initiative; (6) interpersonal skills; and (7) leadership effectiveness. This comprehensive skill set, once required only of managers, but now applying to all levels of employment, appeared in several employer surveys, with an additional emphasis on communication and computer/technical skills. (Author abstract)

    The original hyperlink to this resource has been removed by the publisher. You may obtain a single use PDF by emailing the SSRC at ssrc@opressrc.org.

    In an effort to reevaluate employment preparation in community college curricula, a review of recent research was conducted to identify the most valued skills in today's workforce. Among the abilities desired by today's employers are: (1) knowing how to learn; (2) competence in reading, writing, and computation; (3) effective listening and oral communication skills; (4) adaptability through creative thinking and problem solving; (5) personal management with strong self esteem and initiative; (6) interpersonal skills; and (7) leadership effectiveness. This comprehensive skill set, once required only of managers, but now applying to all levels of employment, appeared in several employer surveys, with an additional emphasis on communication and computer/technical skills. (Author abstract)

    The original hyperlink to this resource has been removed by the publisher. You may obtain a single use PDF by emailing the SSRC at ssrc@opressrc.org.

  • Individual Author: Davies, Jill
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1997

    This paper explores the impact of implementing the U.S. federal welfare law entitled, The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA). In particular, it looks at how the use of the Family Violence Option and the federal block grant program, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), might effect battered women and their children. Its intended primary audiences are domestic violence advocates and others working on domestic violence or welfare issues.

    Information is provided on: interpreting and implementing the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996; the effects of PRWORA on battered women and their children; policy and program responses; an explanation of domestic violence references in the TANF section including the hardship exemption to the 60 month limit on assistance, and, the Family Violence Option; and, a discussion of the Family Violence Option and some recommendations. The paper also includes a definition list of frequently used terms.

    This is the second in a series of complementary...

    This paper explores the impact of implementing the U.S. federal welfare law entitled, The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA). In particular, it looks at how the use of the Family Violence Option and the federal block grant program, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), might effect battered women and their children. Its intended primary audiences are domestic violence advocates and others working on domestic violence or welfare issues.

    Information is provided on: interpreting and implementing the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996; the effects of PRWORA on battered women and their children; policy and program responses; an explanation of domestic violence references in the TANF section including the hardship exemption to the 60 month limit on assistance, and, the Family Violence Option; and, a discussion of the Family Violence Option and some recommendations. The paper also includes a definition list of frequently used terms.

    This is the second in a series of complementary welfare policy and practice papers produced as part of the Welfare and Domestic Violence Technical Assistance Initiative with the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence(NRC) and the National Network to End Domestic Violence(NNEDV). (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Pennsylvania University, National Center on Fathers and Families
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1998

    In December 1998, approximately 100 researchers, policymakers, practitioners, and other specialists in the field of fathers and families convened the Welfare Reform, Fathers, and Families roundtable to explore to potential of enabling services for low-income, noncustodial fathers in the context of welfare reform and child support enforcement. This report synthesizes the discussion of the themes of the meeting and their implications for policymaking, the directions they indicate for future research, and the lessons they impart for practice. The first section of this report describes the current and emerging issues in welfare reform, child support enforcement, and fatherhood initiatives. The second section explores the implications of the issues raised for policymaking. The third section offers new directions for research that arose from the discussion, and the fourth section describes lessons learned for practice. The report concludes with the roundtable agenda and a list of participants. (author abstract)

    In December 1998, approximately 100 researchers, policymakers, practitioners, and other specialists in the field of fathers and families convened the Welfare Reform, Fathers, and Families roundtable to explore to potential of enabling services for low-income, noncustodial fathers in the context of welfare reform and child support enforcement. This report synthesizes the discussion of the themes of the meeting and their implications for policymaking, the directions they indicate for future research, and the lessons they impart for practice. The first section of this report describes the current and emerging issues in welfare reform, child support enforcement, and fatherhood initiatives. The second section explores the implications of the issues raised for policymaking. The third section offers new directions for research that arose from the discussion, and the fourth section describes lessons learned for practice. The report concludes with the roundtable agenda and a list of participants. (author abstract)

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