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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Bloom, Howard
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    This paper examines issues and options for the design of a major non-experimental study to measure the impacts of a large-scale, saturation-level demonstration program to promote employment among residents of selected public housing developments. The program, Jobs-Plus, is being launched by the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and The Rockefeller Foundation. [An updated, full list of the Jobs-Plus funding partners is provided at the front of this paper.] Because Jobs-Plus will be a comprehensive community initiative, available to all residents of the several public housing developments where it is implemented, the program cannot be evaluated using a randomized experiment, the now-standard method for measuring the impacts of employment and training programs. However, because community-wide initiatives are becoming an increasingly important component of social policy, it is essential to develop methods for determining their success. It is the purpose of this paper, therefore, to explore...

    This paper examines issues and options for the design of a major non-experimental study to measure the impacts of a large-scale, saturation-level demonstration program to promote employment among residents of selected public housing developments. The program, Jobs-Plus, is being launched by the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and The Rockefeller Foundation. [An updated, full list of the Jobs-Plus funding partners is provided at the front of this paper.] Because Jobs-Plus will be a comprehensive community initiative, available to all residents of the several public housing developments where it is implemented, the program cannot be evaluated using a randomized experiment, the now-standard method for measuring the impacts of employment and training programs. However, because community-wide initiatives are becoming an increasingly important component of social policy, it is essential to develop methods for determining their success. It is the purpose of this paper, therefore, to explore possibilities for doing so. (author abstract)

    Other resources on the Jobs-Plus project are available here.

  • Individual Author: Riccio, James A.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    The Jobs-Plus Community Revitalization Initiative for Public Housing Families (Jobs-Plus, for short) grew out of The Rockefeller Foundation's interest in sponsoring community-building initiatives that feature employment as both the central goal and the driving force for transforming poor neighborhoods. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development joined The Rockefeller Foundation in its efforts, and MDRC agreed to manage Jobs-Plus and conduct a comprehensive evaluation of its implementation, costs, and effectiveness. The first in a series of documents that detail that evaluation, this report describes the main components of the program and outlines operations at the eight housing developments (in seven cities) that were selected as sites in March 1997. It also explores key aspects of Jobs-Plus, including the formation of agency and community organization partnerships around an employment agenda and the feasibility of providing services, incentives, and supports for work at saturation levels within a community. (author abstract)

    The Jobs-Plus Community Revitalization Initiative for Public Housing Families (Jobs-Plus, for short) grew out of The Rockefeller Foundation's interest in sponsoring community-building initiatives that feature employment as both the central goal and the driving force for transforming poor neighborhoods. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development joined The Rockefeller Foundation in its efforts, and MDRC agreed to manage Jobs-Plus and conduct a comprehensive evaluation of its implementation, costs, and effectiveness. The first in a series of documents that detail that evaluation, this report describes the main components of the program and outlines operations at the eight housing developments (in seven cities) that were selected as sites in March 1997. It also explores key aspects of Jobs-Plus, including the formation of agency and community organization partnerships around an employment agenda and the feasibility of providing services, incentives, and supports for work at saturation levels within a community. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bloom, Susan Philipson; Blank, Susan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    The national Jobs-Plus demonstration represents an ambitious attempt to transform low-work, high-welfare public housing developments into high-work, low-welfare communities. Relying on three program components - employment-related activities and services, enhanced financial incentives to work, and community-based support for work - the program aims to create steady employment for a substantial majority of all working-age, nondisabled development residents. This report documents the nature and extent of program implementation in the seven cities initially included in the Jobs-Plus demonstration. It provides a "snapshot" of each site, detailing infrastructure (including staffing and facilities), program flow (including outreach, enrollment, orientation, assessment, job-related activities, and education-or-training-related initiatives), financial incentives for work, and community supports for work. It also raises three main questions for future implementation research: (1) How do sites implement and integrate financial incentives and community support for work? (2) How do residents...

    The national Jobs-Plus demonstration represents an ambitious attempt to transform low-work, high-welfare public housing developments into high-work, low-welfare communities. Relying on three program components - employment-related activities and services, enhanced financial incentives to work, and community-based support for work - the program aims to create steady employment for a substantial majority of all working-age, nondisabled development residents. This report documents the nature and extent of program implementation in the seven cities initially included in the Jobs-Plus demonstration. It provides a "snapshot" of each site, detailing infrastructure (including staffing and facilities), program flow (including outreach, enrollment, orientation, assessment, job-related activities, and education-or-training-related initiatives), financial incentives for work, and community supports for work. It also raises three main questions for future implementation research: (1) How do sites implement and integrate financial incentives and community support for work? (2) How do residents respond to what Jobs-Plus offers? (3) What are the most feasible implementation strategies and the best practices? (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fitzgerald, Joan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    This paper addresses the role community colleges can play in moving the working poor toward economic independence. Since Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) was enacted in 1996, there have been many new job openings in the country. But, employment and earnings prospects for job seekers leaving the welfare system are dismal. TANF clients are filling jobs in the service sector that pay near-minimum wage. In 1963, 35% of the labor force worked in low-paying jobs, but by 1998 that figure had risen to 63%. Community college vocational programs are uniquely poised to provide the training needed for low-wage workers to advance into better-paying jobs. The author examines the programs offered at three community colleges, each of which illustrates innovation in focusing on career ladders or wage progression. The schools are Shoreline Community College, Washington; South Seattle Community College, Washington; and Community College of Denver, Colorado. Three programs were established at Shoreline using funds from the Department of Social and Health Services. South Seattle uses...

    This paper addresses the role community colleges can play in moving the working poor toward economic independence. Since Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) was enacted in 1996, there have been many new job openings in the country. But, employment and earnings prospects for job seekers leaving the welfare system are dismal. TANF clients are filling jobs in the service sector that pay near-minimum wage. In 1963, 35% of the labor force worked in low-paying jobs, but by 1998 that figure had risen to 63%. Community college vocational programs are uniquely poised to provide the training needed for low-wage workers to advance into better-paying jobs. The author examines the programs offered at three community colleges, each of which illustrates innovation in focusing on career ladders or wage progression. The schools are Shoreline Community College, Washington; South Seattle Community College, Washington; and Community College of Denver, Colorado. Three programs were established at Shoreline using funds from the Department of Social and Health Services. South Seattle uses modules as a way to divide a longer course or program into manageable segments with job advancement connected to each of them. And Denver's Essential Skills program accents the importance of relationships in the process of learning. (Contains 32 references.) (Eric.gov-NB)

  • Individual Author: Gibson, Cynthia M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    The Jobs Initiative, an eight-year demonstration, helps low-income residents find jobs that pay family-supporting wages in Denver, Milwaukee, New Orleans, Philadelphia, St. Louis, and Seattle. "Entrepreneurial intermediaries," ranging from a private foundation to a city agency, manage six sites that take a dramatically different, long-term approach emphasizing comprehensive strategies that fuel community-based work force development. They have a dual customer focus, meeting needs of supply (workers) and demand (employer) sides; identify and secure entry-level jobs offering low-income people livable wages, benefits, and opportunities for wage and career advancement; build on job-seekers' strengths and respect their talent, dignity, and self reliance, while providing support services; increase dialogue, communication, and understanding among stakeholders; provide community-based organizations with sustained support and technical assistance; stress outcomes-based management; and suggest and provoke broader systemic change leading to more effective jobs and work force development...

    The Jobs Initiative, an eight-year demonstration, helps low-income residents find jobs that pay family-supporting wages in Denver, Milwaukee, New Orleans, Philadelphia, St. Louis, and Seattle. "Entrepreneurial intermediaries," ranging from a private foundation to a city agency, manage six sites that take a dramatically different, long-term approach emphasizing comprehensive strategies that fuel community-based work force development. They have a dual customer focus, meeting needs of supply (workers) and demand (employer) sides; identify and secure entry-level jobs offering low-income people livable wages, benefits, and opportunities for wage and career advancement; build on job-seekers' strengths and respect their talent, dignity, and self reliance, while providing support services; increase dialogue, communication, and understanding among stakeholders; provide community-based organizations with sustained support and technical assistance; stress outcomes-based management; and suggest and provoke broader systemic change leading to more effective jobs and work force development programs and policies. Site results indicate that individuals placed in jobs had experienced significant hourly wage and earnings increases; more than twice as many had medical benefits; and more than half had been employed 12 months. Requirements for meeting workplace demands are employer engagement; employee retention and advancement; collaboration; and building organizational capacity. (author abstract)

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