Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Meyer, Daniel R.; Bartfeld, Judi
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    A study was conducted to examine compliance with child support orders by divorced fathers in Wisconsin between 1981 and 1989. The results revealed that compliance increased as the father's income rose and that the burden of orders did not influence compliance unless the order was for over 35 percent of the father's income. There was no evidence that the strength of family ties was related to the compliance rate, and there was only limited evidence that economic need among the mothers and children resulted in greater compliance. Although those fathers who were not paying child support were not a high-income group, they were generally not so poor that they could not afford to pay at least some support. (Author abstract)

     

    A study was conducted to examine compliance with child support orders by divorced fathers in Wisconsin between 1981 and 1989. The results revealed that compliance increased as the father's income rose and that the burden of orders did not influence compliance unless the order was for over 35 percent of the father's income. There was no evidence that the strength of family ties was related to the compliance rate, and there was only limited evidence that economic need among the mothers and children resulted in greater compliance. Although those fathers who were not paying child support were not a high-income group, they were generally not so poor that they could not afford to pay at least some support. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Cancian, Maria; Heinrich, Carolyn; Chung, Yiyoon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    Despite substantial technological improvements to the child support enforcement program, many single parents do not receive child support. Particularly for families whose incomes are below the poverty level, child support is frequently a vital financial resource. The federal government’s primary motivation for establishing the federal Child Support Enforcement (CSE) program was to recover the costs associated with public assistance payments to poor single-parent families by collecting payments from the noncustodial parents. In this study, we use variation in the birthing costs over time and across counties in Wisconsin to identify the effect of child support debt on nonresident fathers’ child support payments and formal earnings. Our results suggest that higher arrears, in themselves, substantially reduce both child support payments and formal earnings for the fathers and families that already likely struggle in securing steady employment and coping with economic disadvantage, a serious unintended consequence of child support policy (author abstract).

    Despite substantial technological improvements to the child support enforcement program, many single parents do not receive child support. Particularly for families whose incomes are below the poverty level, child support is frequently a vital financial resource. The federal government’s primary motivation for establishing the federal Child Support Enforcement (CSE) program was to recover the costs associated with public assistance payments to poor single-parent families by collecting payments from the noncustodial parents. In this study, we use variation in the birthing costs over time and across counties in Wisconsin to identify the effect of child support debt on nonresident fathers’ child support payments and formal earnings. Our results suggest that higher arrears, in themselves, substantially reduce both child support payments and formal earnings for the fathers and families that already likely struggle in securing steady employment and coping with economic disadvantage, a serious unintended consequence of child support policy (author abstract).

  • Individual Author: Heinrich, Carolyn J.; Burkhardt, Brett C.; Shager, Hilary M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    As child support debt owed nationally persists at enormous levels, both noncustodial parents and the custodial families who are not receiving support suffer significant hardships, and states are forced to expend greater resources on collection and enforcement efforts. This paper presents findings from an evaluation of a demonstration program developed to help noncustodial parents with large child support debts reduce their debt while simultaneously increasing child support paid to families, through gradual forgiveness of arrears conditional on payment of current child support obligations. The evaluation employs a randomized experimental design, nonexperimental analyses using propensity score matching and multilevel modeling techniques, and focus groups and follow-up interviews. Results show a pattern of effects that suggests individuals responded to the program as intended. State- and family-owed child support debt balances decreased for program participants, and participants paid more toward their child support obligations and arrears and made more frequent child support...

    As child support debt owed nationally persists at enormous levels, both noncustodial parents and the custodial families who are not receiving support suffer significant hardships, and states are forced to expend greater resources on collection and enforcement efforts. This paper presents findings from an evaluation of a demonstration program developed to help noncustodial parents with large child support debts reduce their debt while simultaneously increasing child support paid to families, through gradual forgiveness of arrears conditional on payment of current child support obligations. The evaluation employs a randomized experimental design, nonexperimental analyses using propensity score matching and multilevel modeling techniques, and focus groups and follow-up interviews. Results show a pattern of effects that suggests individuals responded to the program as intended. State- and family-owed child support debt balances decreased for program participants, and participants paid more toward their child support obligations and arrears and made more frequent child support payments. The study findings suggest promise for the effectiveness of this program model in reducing child support debt burdens and in increasing families' receipt of child support, and they also point to ways in which the implementation of the program might be improved (author abstract).

  • Individual Author: Boggess, Jacquelyn; Price, Anne; Rodriguez, Nino
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Our nation’s families are undergoing a sea change. Over the last 30 years, as wages have stagnated and declined, more unmarried couples are living together and having children. Fewer than half of adults with lower incomes and less education are now married, and marriage has increasingly become the norm only among couples with higher incomes and college educations. The economic challenges facing low-income families are especially acute for black parents and their children: 73% are born to unmarried parents. The risk of economic hardship for children is even greater in mother-headed households. Child support enforcement—typically transferring money from the father to the mother—is often thought of as one way to reduce poverty among children and families. However, this only works if the father has enough income or assets to be able to pay. According to the US Census Bureau, the large majority—70 percent—of custodial parents with children living in poverty receive no child support whatsoever. For black custodial parents, this figure rises to 75 percent. (author introduction)

    Our nation’s families are undergoing a sea change. Over the last 30 years, as wages have stagnated and declined, more unmarried couples are living together and having children. Fewer than half of adults with lower incomes and less education are now married, and marriage has increasingly become the norm only among couples with higher incomes and college educations. The economic challenges facing low-income families are especially acute for black parents and their children: 73% are born to unmarried parents. The risk of economic hardship for children is even greater in mother-headed households. Child support enforcement—typically transferring money from the father to the mother—is often thought of as one way to reduce poverty among children and families. However, this only works if the father has enough income or assets to be able to pay. According to the US Census Bureau, the large majority—70 percent—of custodial parents with children living in poverty receive no child support whatsoever. For black custodial parents, this figure rises to 75 percent. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Meyer, Daniel R. ; Cancian, Maria; Chen, Yiyu
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Despite substantial policy attention to increasing the number of custodial parents with child support orders, the proportion reporting that they are owed child support is falling. Potential explanations for this include increases in shared custody, increases in the number of noncustodial parents who have low incomes (or incomes lower than the custodial parent), and growing discretion to decide whether to participate in the formal child support system. We use data on about 4,000 divorces in Wisconsin that allow us to evaluate these alternative explanations, differentiating between divorces in an earlier period (1996–98) and a later one (2004–7). A multivariate analysis and a standard decomposition approach both show that changes in custody, relative incomes, the freedom to choose child support, and other characteristics explain about half of the decline in the likelihood of orders, but about half remains unexplained. Changes in custody are particularly important in explaining the trend. (Author abstract)

    Despite substantial policy attention to increasing the number of custodial parents with child support orders, the proportion reporting that they are owed child support is falling. Potential explanations for this include increases in shared custody, increases in the number of noncustodial parents who have low incomes (or incomes lower than the custodial parent), and growing discretion to decide whether to participate in the formal child support system. We use data on about 4,000 divorces in Wisconsin that allow us to evaluate these alternative explanations, differentiating between divorces in an earlier period (1996–98) and a later one (2004–7). A multivariate analysis and a standard decomposition approach both show that changes in custody, relative incomes, the freedom to choose child support, and other characteristics explain about half of the decline in the likelihood of orders, but about half remains unexplained. Changes in custody are particularly important in explaining the trend. (Author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1996 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations