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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Meyer, Daniel R.; Bartfeld, Judi
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    A study was conducted to examine compliance with child support orders by divorced fathers in Wisconsin between 1981 and 1989. The results revealed that compliance increased as the father's income rose and that the burden of orders did not influence compliance unless the order was for over 35 percent of the father's income. There was no evidence that the strength of family ties was related to the compliance rate, and there was only limited evidence that economic need among the mothers and children resulted in greater compliance. Although those fathers who were not paying child support were not a high-income group, they were generally not so poor that they could not afford to pay at least some support. (Author abstract)

     

    A study was conducted to examine compliance with child support orders by divorced fathers in Wisconsin between 1981 and 1989. The results revealed that compliance increased as the father's income rose and that the burden of orders did not influence compliance unless the order was for over 35 percent of the father's income. There was no evidence that the strength of family ties was related to the compliance rate, and there was only limited evidence that economic need among the mothers and children resulted in greater compliance. Although those fathers who were not paying child support were not a high-income group, they were generally not so poor that they could not afford to pay at least some support. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Meyer, Daniel R.; Bartfeld, Judi
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1998

    This article examines compliance patterns of child support cases taking place in Wisconsin from 1986 through 1988. The researchers find that sixty-five percent of child support is paid during each of the first five years following divorce, dispelling the notion that child support payments decline over time. The researchers also find a large polarization between full-payers and complete non-payers, as those who tend to comply during the first year tend to indicate a long-term compliance. An examination of divorced and unmarried fathers is also given. (author abstract)

    This article examines compliance patterns of child support cases taking place in Wisconsin from 1986 through 1988. The researchers find that sixty-five percent of child support is paid during each of the first five years following divorce, dispelling the notion that child support payments decline over time. The researchers also find a large polarization between full-payers and complete non-payers, as those who tend to comply during the first year tend to indicate a long-term compliance. An examination of divorced and unmarried fathers is also given. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Martinson, Karin; Trutko, John; Strong, Debra
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    The Welfare-to-Work (WtW) Grants Program, authorized by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, provides federal funding to states and local organizations to help welfare recipients and other low-income parents move into employment, stay employed, and improve their economic situation. Low-income noncustodial parents (NCPs) (mainly fathers) of welfare children are among the main target groups for WtW services, along with custodial parents who are receiving cash assistance under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program and moving from welfare to work. This focus reflects policymakers' growing interest in strategies to increase the employment and earnings of noncustodial fathers and thereby improve their ability to provide financial support for their children and play an active role in their lives.

    WtW grants represent a new source of funding for local work-focused services to NCPs. This report describes 11 local programs funded by WtW grants, in terms of the types of organizations operating the programs, the range of services offered, and the interagency...

    The Welfare-to-Work (WtW) Grants Program, authorized by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, provides federal funding to states and local organizations to help welfare recipients and other low-income parents move into employment, stay employed, and improve their economic situation. Low-income noncustodial parents (NCPs) (mainly fathers) of welfare children are among the main target groups for WtW services, along with custodial parents who are receiving cash assistance under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program and moving from welfare to work. This focus reflects policymakers' growing interest in strategies to increase the employment and earnings of noncustodial fathers and thereby improve their ability to provide financial support for their children and play an active role in their lives.

    WtW grants represent a new source of funding for local work-focused services to NCPs. This report describes 11 local programs funded by WtW grants, in terms of the types of organizations operating the programs, the range of services offered, and the interagency collaborations in effect. No single strategy or set of services predominates. Rather, local grant recipients have discretion in developing and implementing program models, within the parameters of the WtW regulations. Thus, the experiences of these programs illustrate a variety of strategies and approaches that are being implemented around the nation and highlight key issues that must be addressed to serve this population group. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Meyer, Daniel R.; Cancian, Maria
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    The CSDE includes experimental and nonexperimental components. A previous report presented results
    from the experimental evaluation for the first cohort of cases. This three-volume report includes results
    from the nonexperimental analyses.
    • Volume I summarizes and compares the experimental evaluation and three quantitative
    nonexperimental studies.
    • Volume II reports on fathers of children in W-2 families, and features findings from an
    ethnographic study.
    • This volume includes the full quantitative nonexperimental studies summarized in Volume I.

    In 1996, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) eliminated the AFDC program and gave states considerable flexibility and responsibility in designing a replacement program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). Under AFDC, states were required to pass through to the family the first $50 per month of child support collected, and to disregard this amount in calculating AFDC benefits. Under TANF, states could set their own policies for passing through...

    The CSDE includes experimental and nonexperimental components. A previous report presented results
    from the experimental evaluation for the first cohort of cases. This three-volume report includes results
    from the nonexperimental analyses.
    • Volume I summarizes and compares the experimental evaluation and three quantitative
    nonexperimental studies.
    • Volume II reports on fathers of children in W-2 families, and features findings from an
    ethnographic study.
    • This volume includes the full quantitative nonexperimental studies summarized in Volume I.

    In 1996, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) eliminated the AFDC program and gave states considerable flexibility and responsibility in designing a replacement program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). Under AFDC, states were required to pass through to the family the first $50 per month of child support collected, and to disregard this amount in calculating AFDC benefits. Under TANF, states could set their own policies for passing through and disregarding any child support paid on behalf of children on cash assistance, and were required only to withhold the federal share of child support collected. Under the new rules, most states chose to pass no money collected to the resident parent. In 1997, Wisconsin received a waiver from federal rules allowing it to pass through the entire amount of support collected to the resident parent, and to disregard all child support in calculating TANF cash payments. One requirement of the waiver was to conduct an evaluation of this policy change, the Child Support Demonstration Evaluation (CSDE). A key component of the CSDE is a random-assignment experimental evaluation: although most parents in the state receive the full amount of child support paid on their behalf (the experimental group), a randomly selected group of parents (the control group) receives only a portion of what is paid.

    Currently most state evaluations of TANF-related policy changes are nonexperimental; it is therefore particularly important to reach a fuller understanding of the sensitivity of conclusions to the type of evaluation. This report contains three nonexperimental analyses that provide additional information on whether pass-through policy affects formal child support payments and orders and paternity establishment rates. The report also includes a comparison of these nonexperimental results with the CSDE experimental evaluation findings. (author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Cancian, Maria; Meyer, Daniel R.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2004

    Although a number of current policy initiatives presume that nonresident fathers could provide substantially more income for their (welfare-attached) children, several factors lead to skepticism. This article uses administrative and survey data to describe the characteristics of fathers of welfare recipients. The results suggest that most of these fathers have limited economic resources and, like the mothers of their children, often face substantial barriers to providing for themselves and their families. Balancing the needs and obligations of low-income mothers and fathers is difficult. (author abstract)

    Although a number of current policy initiatives presume that nonresident fathers could provide substantially more income for their (welfare-attached) children, several factors lead to skepticism. This article uses administrative and survey data to describe the characteristics of fathers of welfare recipients. The results suggest that most of these fathers have limited economic resources and, like the mothers of their children, often face substantial barriers to providing for themselves and their families. Balancing the needs and obligations of low-income mothers and fathers is difficult. (author abstract)

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