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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
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  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Kauffman, Jo Ann
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRETORIA) gives American Indian tribes the option to run their own Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program or leave these services under state administration. Eight case studies were conducted in Oregon, Wisconsin, and Arizona with the Klamath Tribes, Siletz Tribe, Warm Springs Confederated Tribes, Stockbridge-Munsee Community Band of the Mohican Indians, Forest County Potawatomi Tribe, Oneida Nation, White Mountain Apache, and Pascua Yaqui Tribe. Document reviews and interviews with tribal and state officials and TANF participants provided data on coordination with the state, training and technical assistance, program design, impact of TANF on the tribe, and tribal views of TANF strengths and weaknesses. Six tribes designed and administered their own TANF program, one tribe left TANF entirely up to the state, and one tribe is serving as a contractor for the state's welfare reform program. Most tribal plans mirrored state plans but were flexible as to time limits and work hours and...

    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRETORIA) gives American Indian tribes the option to run their own Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program or leave these services under state administration. Eight case studies were conducted in Oregon, Wisconsin, and Arizona with the Klamath Tribes, Siletz Tribe, Warm Springs Confederated Tribes, Stockbridge-Munsee Community Band of the Mohican Indians, Forest County Potawatomi Tribe, Oneida Nation, White Mountain Apache, and Pascua Yaqui Tribe. Document reviews and interviews with tribal and state officials and TANF participants provided data on coordination with the state, training and technical assistance, program design, impact of TANF on the tribe, and tribal views of TANF strengths and weaknesses. Six tribes designed and administered their own TANF program, one tribe left TANF entirely up to the state, and one tribe is serving as a contractor for the state's welfare reform program. Most tribal plans mirrored state plans but were flexible as to time limits and work hours and expanded the definition of work activities to include education. Tribal and state relationships were key to successful efforts; assuring access to medical assistance and food stamps was not always a priority; developing new job opportunities was challenging; and unmet needs persisted for alcohol, drug, and mental health treatment. Lessons learned include TANF affected tribes regardless of whether they administered programs; restructuring tribal programs benefitted clients; welfare reform is about work and community support; there was no one model for a TANF effort; medical assistance and food stamps need to be coordinated with TANF; and coordination between tribes and states is critical. Three appendices present methodology, interviewees, and acronyms. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hahn, Heather
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    This publication provides an in-depth, systematic description of program implementation, operations, outputs, and outcomes of four Tribal TANF programs (the Navajo Nation Program for Self-Reliance, Tanana Chiefs Conference, Athabascan Self-Sufficiency Assistance Project, and South Puget Intertribal Planning Agency).  The publication also identifies promising practices and other areas for further study.

    Overall, the study found that tribes use the flexibility of Tribal TANF to create diverse programs that reflect their unique circumstances, opportunities, and cultures.  Elements of tribal culture were evident in the program design, in the way program staff and clients interacted, and in the types of activities in which clients were engaged.  The Tribal TANF programs in the study generally focus on the broad goal of self-sufficiency, beyond the narrower goal of employment. (Author abstract)

     

    This publication provides an in-depth, systematic description of program implementation, operations, outputs, and outcomes of four Tribal TANF programs (the Navajo Nation Program for Self-Reliance, Tanana Chiefs Conference, Athabascan Self-Sufficiency Assistance Project, and South Puget Intertribal Planning Agency).  The publication also identifies promising practices and other areas for further study.

    Overall, the study found that tribes use the flexibility of Tribal TANF to create diverse programs that reflect their unique circumstances, opportunities, and cultures.  Elements of tribal culture were evident in the program design, in the way program staff and clients interacted, and in the types of activities in which clients were engaged.  The Tribal TANF programs in the study generally focus on the broad goal of self-sufficiency, beyond the narrower goal of employment. (Author abstract)