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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Plastrik, Peter; Taylor, Judith C.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    In 1995, the Annie E. Casey Foundation was in the vanguard of a shift to a systems-change focus when it launched the Jobs Initiative in six metropolitan areas—Denver, Milwaukee, New Orleans, Philadelphia, St. Louis, and Seattle. “We hoped in the long run to influence how low-income, young-adult job-seekers could create better connections to regional labor markets on a sustainable basis,” explains Bob Giloth, program manager for the Jobs Initiative. “That meant changing the system’s behavior.”

    The foundation believed that several critical ingredients had to come together at the local level to mount systemic reform: first, a local intermediary well-positioned within the regional civic infrastructure, and second, that intermediary would have to have the funds and capacity to conduct research, assemble powerful coalitions, and test experimental programs and policies that would guide eventual changes in the system. In particular, the Casey Foundation thought that intermediaries, as they developed projects to help place low-income job seekers, would “rub” against the existing...

    In 1995, the Annie E. Casey Foundation was in the vanguard of a shift to a systems-change focus when it launched the Jobs Initiative in six metropolitan areas—Denver, Milwaukee, New Orleans, Philadelphia, St. Louis, and Seattle. “We hoped in the long run to influence how low-income, young-adult job-seekers could create better connections to regional labor markets on a sustainable basis,” explains Bob Giloth, program manager for the Jobs Initiative. “That meant changing the system’s behavior.”

    The foundation believed that several critical ingredients had to come together at the local level to mount systemic reform: first, a local intermediary well-positioned within the regional civic infrastructure, and second, that intermediary would have to have the funds and capacity to conduct research, assemble powerful coalitions, and test experimental programs and policies that would guide eventual changes in the system. In particular, the Casey Foundation thought that intermediaries, as they developed projects to help place low-income job seekers, would “rub” against the existing system, identify critical issues to be addressed, and, based on what they were learning, develop long-term strategies to reform systems. One such project that the foundation encouraged intermediaries to undertake was the creation of a Jobs Policy Network, an effort to bring together actors in the system to identify and advocate for changes. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Schneider, Jo Anne
    Reference Type: White Papers
    Year: 2006

    This paper provides a succinct overview of the concept of social capital and describes ways in which social capital can play a role in economic and community development. Examples illustrating these concepts are drawn from more than 20 years of research in urban communities, as well as from case studies produced by others involved with community development. The paper addresses the following questions:
    1) What is social capital, and how do the various kinds of social capital play out in the ways that community needs are met?
    2) What kinds of social capital building strategies are useful in economic and community development?

    (Author abstract)

    This paper provides a succinct overview of the concept of social capital and describes ways in which social capital can play a role in economic and community development. Examples illustrating these concepts are drawn from more than 20 years of research in urban communities, as well as from case studies produced by others involved with community development. The paper addresses the following questions:
    1) What is social capital, and how do the various kinds of social capital play out in the ways that community needs are met?
    2) What kinds of social capital building strategies are useful in economic and community development?

    (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Martinson, Karin; Hamilton, Gayle
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    This brief presents findings, and lessons for policy and practice, from MDRC-conducted studies of five programs that provided earnings supplements and that have been rigorously evaluated using a random assignment research design: the Canadian Self-Sufficiency Project (SSP), the Minnesota Family Investment Program (MFIP), Milwaukee’s New Hope Project, the Texas Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) program, and the United Kingdom Employment Retention and Advancement (UK ERA) program. The evaluations primarily focus on the effects of the programs on single parents. SSP, MFIP, and New Hope operated some time ago (primarily in the 1990s), but long-run follow-up data are available only recently. In addition, relatively new evaluation results are available from the more recent Texas ERA and UK ERA programs.

    This brief discusses key findings from evaluations of these earnings supplement programs and then provides lessons for both policy and practice that have emerged from these initiatives. While each program had its own set of unique circumstances and lessons (and none is...

    This brief presents findings, and lessons for policy and practice, from MDRC-conducted studies of five programs that provided earnings supplements and that have been rigorously evaluated using a random assignment research design: the Canadian Self-Sufficiency Project (SSP), the Minnesota Family Investment Program (MFIP), Milwaukee’s New Hope Project, the Texas Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) program, and the United Kingdom Employment Retention and Advancement (UK ERA) program. The evaluations primarily focus on the effects of the programs on single parents. SSP, MFIP, and New Hope operated some time ago (primarily in the 1990s), but long-run follow-up data are available only recently. In addition, relatively new evaluation results are available from the more recent Texas ERA and UK ERA programs.

    This brief discusses key findings from evaluations of these earnings supplement programs and then provides lessons for both policy and practice that have emerged from these initiatives. While each program had its own set of unique circumstances and lessons (and none is currently operating), the focus here is on common themes across the initiatives. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Meit, Michael; Bushar, Jessica; Langerman, Heather; Scherer, Hilary; Hafford, Carol; Knudson, Alana; Hernandez, Aleena; Dotomain, Evangeline; Allis, Paul
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    This practice brief is the first in a series of practice briefs being developed by the Tribal HPOG evaluation team, comprised of NORC at the University of Chicago, Red Star Innovations, and the National Indian Health Board. The briefs will be used to disseminate important lessons learned and findings from the Evaluation of the Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) program , which is being funded by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation within the Administration for Children and Families. The Tribal HPOG program is funded by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to support 32 demonstration projects, including 5 Tribal Organizations and Colleges, to train Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals as health care professionals. The purpose of this first practice brief is to: (1) describe the unique aspects of the Tribal HPOG grantee organizations and the target populations they serve; (2) introduce the program frameworks of the Tribal HPOG grantees; and (3) provide an overview of the Federally-sponsored evaluation of the...

    This practice brief is the first in a series of practice briefs being developed by the Tribal HPOG evaluation team, comprised of NORC at the University of Chicago, Red Star Innovations, and the National Indian Health Board. The briefs will be used to disseminate important lessons learned and findings from the Evaluation of the Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) program , which is being funded by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation within the Administration for Children and Families. The Tribal HPOG program is funded by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to support 32 demonstration projects, including 5 Tribal Organizations and Colleges, to train Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals as health care professionals. The purpose of this first practice brief is to: (1) describe the unique aspects of the Tribal HPOG grantee organizations and the target populations they serve; (2) introduce the program frameworks of the Tribal HPOG grantees; and (3) provide an overview of the Federally-sponsored evaluation of the Tribal HPOG grantees. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Meit, Michael; Meyer, Katherine; Gilbert, Tess; Levintow, Sara; Langerman, Heather; Hafford, Carol; Knudson, Alana; Hernandez, Aleena; Carino, Theresa; Allis, Paul
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This brief provides an overview of the strategies that Tribal HPOG grantees have used to implement the HPOG program, challenges encountered during implementation, lessons learned, and ongoing program evolution and adaptation to address unique tribal cultural and programmatic needs. The brief draws upon qualitative data collected from the first year of evaluation activities with the Tribal HPOG programs. It is part of a series of briefs being developed by the Tribal HPOG evaluation team, comprised of NORC at the University of Chicago, Red Star Innovations and the National Indian Health Board (NIHB). (author abstract)

    This brief provides an overview of the strategies that Tribal HPOG grantees have used to implement the HPOG program, challenges encountered during implementation, lessons learned, and ongoing program evolution and adaptation to address unique tribal cultural and programmatic needs. The brief draws upon qualitative data collected from the first year of evaluation activities with the Tribal HPOG programs. It is part of a series of briefs being developed by the Tribal HPOG evaluation team, comprised of NORC at the University of Chicago, Red Star Innovations and the National Indian Health Board (NIHB). (author abstract)

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