Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Boggess, Jacquelyn; Price, Anne; Rodriguez, Nino
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Our nation’s families are undergoing a sea change. Over the last 30 years, as wages have stagnated and declined, more unmarried couples are living together and having children. Fewer than half of adults with lower incomes and less education are now married, and marriage has increasingly become the norm only among couples with higher incomes and college educations. The economic challenges facing low-income families are especially acute for black parents and their children: 73% are born to unmarried parents. The risk of economic hardship for children is even greater in mother-headed households. Child support enforcement—typically transferring money from the father to the mother—is often thought of as one way to reduce poverty among children and families. However, this only works if the father has enough income or assets to be able to pay. According to the US Census Bureau, the large majority—70 percent—of custodial parents with children living in poverty receive no child support whatsoever. For black custodial parents, this figure rises to 75 percent. (author introduction)

    Our nation’s families are undergoing a sea change. Over the last 30 years, as wages have stagnated and declined, more unmarried couples are living together and having children. Fewer than half of adults with lower incomes and less education are now married, and marriage has increasingly become the norm only among couples with higher incomes and college educations. The economic challenges facing low-income families are especially acute for black parents and their children: 73% are born to unmarried parents. The risk of economic hardship for children is even greater in mother-headed households. Child support enforcement—typically transferring money from the father to the mother—is often thought of as one way to reduce poverty among children and families. However, this only works if the father has enough income or assets to be able to pay. According to the US Census Bureau, the large majority—70 percent—of custodial parents with children living in poverty receive no child support whatsoever. For black custodial parents, this figure rises to 75 percent. (author introduction)