Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Buron, Larry; Nolden, Sandra; Heintzi, Kathleen; Stewart, Julie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    Created by the Tax Reform Act of 1986, the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program is the primary affordable housing production program in the U.S. This study explores the social and economic characteristics of LIHTC residents and the neighborhoods in which these properties are located. It is intended to provide both new information on who is served by the tax credit program and to explore tenant and project characteristics in relation to the neighborhoods where the properties are developed.

    The findings of this report are based on a sample of LIHTC properties placed in service between 1992 and 1994 in five MSAs: Boston, Kansas City, Miami, Milwaukee, and Oakland. In total, 39 properties are included in the study with between six and nine properties in each MSA. Properties with fewer than 10 units, FmHA Section 515 projects, and projects serving special needs populations were not included in the study. The properties were selected to include a relatively even share of both for-profit and nonprofit-sponsored properties in each MSA (however, the results were weighted...

    Created by the Tax Reform Act of 1986, the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program is the primary affordable housing production program in the U.S. This study explores the social and economic characteristics of LIHTC residents and the neighborhoods in which these properties are located. It is intended to provide both new information on who is served by the tax credit program and to explore tenant and project characteristics in relation to the neighborhoods where the properties are developed.

    The findings of this report are based on a sample of LIHTC properties placed in service between 1992 and 1994 in five MSAs: Boston, Kansas City, Miami, Milwaukee, and Oakland. In total, 39 properties are included in the study with between six and nine properties in each MSA. Properties with fewer than 10 units, FmHA Section 515 projects, and projects serving special needs populations were not included in the study. The properties were selected to include a relatively even share of both for-profit and nonprofit-sponsored properties in each MSA (however, the results were weighted to reflect all eligible properties in the five study MSAs). Data collection included field visits and interviews with site managers and owners of each property and a telephone survey of 832 residents in the study properties. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schreiner, Mark; Clancy, Margaret; Sherraden, Michael
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    The American Dream Demonstration (ADD) is the first systematic study of Individual Development Account (IDA) programs. IDAs are special accounts wherein savings are matched for the poor.

    While saving is not easy for anyone, it is more difficult for the poor because they have few resources and because they lack access to some public policy mechanisms, such as tax-benefited retirement accounts, that subsidize saving. IDAs are designed to increase savings incentives for the poor. Savings in IDAs are matched if used for home ownership, post-secondary education, microenterprise, or other approved asset uses. Participants also receive financial education and support from IDA staff.

    Do IDAs work? ADD suggests that the poor can save and accumulate assets in IDAs:

    Average monthly net deposits per participant were $19.07.

    The average participant saved about $1 for every $2 that could have been matched.

    The average participant made a deposit in about 6 of every 12 months.

    With an average match rate of about 2:1, participants accumulated...

    The American Dream Demonstration (ADD) is the first systematic study of Individual Development Account (IDA) programs. IDAs are special accounts wherein savings are matched for the poor.

    While saving is not easy for anyone, it is more difficult for the poor because they have few resources and because they lack access to some public policy mechanisms, such as tax-benefited retirement accounts, that subsidize saving. IDAs are designed to increase savings incentives for the poor. Savings in IDAs are matched if used for home ownership, post-secondary education, microenterprise, or other approved asset uses. Participants also receive financial education and support from IDA staff.

    Do IDAs work? ADD suggests that the poor can save and accumulate assets in IDAs:

    Average monthly net deposits per participant were $19.07.

    The average participant saved about $1 for every $2 that could have been matched.

    The average participant made a deposit in about 6 of every 12 months.

    With an average match rate of about 2:1, participants accumulated approximately $700 per year in IDAs. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Woolley, Mark
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    This report analyzes survey data about the use of financial services by families living in the 10 Making Connections cities across the United States. The report evaluates resident responses by their use of bank services, check cashing services, payday lenders, pawn shops and credit cards, as well as how they would respond to financial emergencies. It correlates how factors such as race/ethnicity, immigrant status, income, employment level, and neighborhood of residence influenced the use of financial services. (Author abstract)

    This report analyzes survey data about the use of financial services by families living in the 10 Making Connections cities across the United States. The report evaluates resident responses by their use of bank services, check cashing services, payday lenders, pawn shops and credit cards, as well as how they would respond to financial emergencies. It correlates how factors such as race/ethnicity, immigrant status, income, employment level, and neighborhood of residence influenced the use of financial services. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rawlings, Lynette A.; Capps, Randolph; Gentsch, Kerstin; Fortuny, Karina
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    How are immigrants integrating in U.S. inner cities? To answer this question, this report draws on a unique survey of residents in 10 vulnerable urban neighborhoods to examine the financial well-being and economic integration of families of different racial, ethnic, and nativity status. The paper explores the extent to which the economic well-being of immigrant groups is influenced by specific factors related to their immigrant status, compared with members of native-born minority groups and native-born whites. Among the main findings from the analysis is that families with children across all groups are especially vulnerable. In addition, we find that immigrants and native minorities in the neighborhoods we examine face similar types of economic difficulties—although to varying degrees. However, after controlling for citizenship, English proficiency, education and having a driver's license and a reliable car, many of the economic disadvantages disappear for immigrant groups, but not for native-born minorities. These findings suggest that even in these tough neighborhoods, the...

    How are immigrants integrating in U.S. inner cities? To answer this question, this report draws on a unique survey of residents in 10 vulnerable urban neighborhoods to examine the financial well-being and economic integration of families of different racial, ethnic, and nativity status. The paper explores the extent to which the economic well-being of immigrant groups is influenced by specific factors related to their immigrant status, compared with members of native-born minority groups and native-born whites. Among the main findings from the analysis is that families with children across all groups are especially vulnerable. In addition, we find that immigrants and native minorities in the neighborhoods we examine face similar types of economic difficulties—although to varying degrees. However, after controlling for citizenship, English proficiency, education and having a driver's license and a reliable car, many of the economic disadvantages disappear for immigrant groups, but not for native-born minorities. These findings suggest that even in these tough neighborhoods, the potential for economic integration of immigrants is strong. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gustitus, Sandra; Simmons, Melody; Waller, Margy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    Changes in the location of work and residence in the last century have dramatically altered the landscape of our nation and changed the transportation needs of communities and workers. As a result, most communities now depend on private vehicle access to ensure that workers can fill and retain jobs by effectively managing the distance and travel time between work and home and access to goods and services not well served by public transit. In recent decades, policymakers have created new barriers to economic strength and employment by adopting legislation that makes license holding, and therefore access to legal driving, more tenuous—particularly for low-wage employees. In this report, we highlight promising initiatives and provide recommendations for policymakers to reduce the impact of economic license suspensions that are unrelated to driving competency and public safety. (author abstract)

    Changes in the location of work and residence in the last century have dramatically altered the landscape of our nation and changed the transportation needs of communities and workers. As a result, most communities now depend on private vehicle access to ensure that workers can fill and retain jobs by effectively managing the distance and travel time between work and home and access to goods and services not well served by public transit. In recent decades, policymakers have created new barriers to economic strength and employment by adopting legislation that makes license holding, and therefore access to legal driving, more tenuous—particularly for low-wage employees. In this report, we highlight promising initiatives and provide recommendations for policymakers to reduce the impact of economic license suspensions that are unrelated to driving competency and public safety. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2000 to 2016

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations