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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: McIntire, James L.; Robins, Amy F.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    This study was undertaken in an effort to assess the impacts of recent policy, organizational, and technology changes on the delivery of employment services to welfare recipients. The study examines five of the most developed and promising One-Stop Job Centers around the country to find out what makes them work well, and to understand their potential for moving people from welfare to self-sufficiency. This study does not provide a formal evaluation of these model programs, but identifies those approaches and practices that seem to be working well in different locations. (author abstract)

    This study was undertaken in an effort to assess the impacts of recent policy, organizational, and technology changes on the delivery of employment services to welfare recipients. The study examines five of the most developed and promising One-Stop Job Centers around the country to find out what makes them work well, and to understand their potential for moving people from welfare to self-sufficiency. This study does not provide a formal evaluation of these model programs, but identifies those approaches and practices that seem to be working well in different locations. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Nightingale, Demetra S.; Pindus, Nancy; Trutko, John; Egner, Michael
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    This is one of several reports from the congressionally mandated national evaluation of the WtW grants program, being conducted by Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., along with its subcontractors the Urban Institute and Support Services International. The report presents findings from the process and implementation analysis component of the evaluation, and describes the service delivery operations of programs funded with WtW grants in eleven study sites in Boston, Massachusetts; Chicago, Illinois; Fort Worth, Texas; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Nashville, Tennessee; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Phoenix, Arizona; Yakima, Washington; Indiana (19-county area); West Virginia (29-county area); and the Johns Hopkins University Multi-site Grantee operating in Baltimore County, Maryland; St. Lucie, Florida; and Long Beach, California. This report is based on (1) information collected through two rounds of site visits in 1999 and 2001, and (2) management information system data maintained by the programs on participants and services.

    The organizational systems within which the WtW grant...

    This is one of several reports from the congressionally mandated national evaluation of the WtW grants program, being conducted by Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., along with its subcontractors the Urban Institute and Support Services International. The report presents findings from the process and implementation analysis component of the evaluation, and describes the service delivery operations of programs funded with WtW grants in eleven study sites in Boston, Massachusetts; Chicago, Illinois; Fort Worth, Texas; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Nashville, Tennessee; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Phoenix, Arizona; Yakima, Washington; Indiana (19-county area); West Virginia (29-county area); and the Johns Hopkins University Multi-site Grantee operating in Baltimore County, Maryland; St. Lucie, Florida; and Long Beach, California. This report is based on (1) information collected through two rounds of site visits in 1999 and 2001, and (2) management information system data maintained by the programs on participants and services.

    The organizational systems within which the WtW grant programs operate are complex and highly decentralized. In most of the eleven study sites, there are multiple programs, often operating in multiple locations, with varying arrangements for coordinating procedures with TANF agencies. Although Workforce Investment Boards (WIBs) are the primary administrative entity, many have formal interaction with TANF agencies, and are often contracted to operate TANF work programs. Nonprofit organizations also play a major role, as direct program operators under subcontract from a WtW grantee, and as providers of special services. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Nightingale, Demetra Smith; O’Brien, Carolyn Taylor; Egner, Michael; Pindus, Nancy; Trutko, John
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    The Welfare-to-Work (WtW) Grants program, authorized by Congress in 1998, has provided supplemental funding to state and local agencies for employment-related services to hard-to-employ welfare recipients and noncustodial parents of children eligible for assistance. The intent was to complement funds available through the federal welfare block grant, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). WtW grant awards were made in phases by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) in 1998 and 1999, and most funds were distributed through the workforce investment system. Hundreds of programs were implemented with WtW grants, through various agencies and organizations, and all were required to coordinate with TANF agencies.

    This report updates an earlier implementation analysis report issued in June 2002 as part of the national evaluation of the WtW grants program being conducted for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services by Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., the Urban Institute, and Support Services International. That earlier report was based on structured site visits to...

    The Welfare-to-Work (WtW) Grants program, authorized by Congress in 1998, has provided supplemental funding to state and local agencies for employment-related services to hard-to-employ welfare recipients and noncustodial parents of children eligible for assistance. The intent was to complement funds available through the federal welfare block grant, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). WtW grant awards were made in phases by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) in 1998 and 1999, and most funds were distributed through the workforce investment system. Hundreds of programs were implemented with WtW grants, through various agencies and organizations, and all were required to coordinate with TANF agencies.

    This report updates an earlier implementation analysis report issued in June 2002 as part of the national evaluation of the WtW grants program being conducted for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services by Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., the Urban Institute, and Support Services International. That earlier report was based on structured site visits to eleven study programs in late 2001. However, several developments and trends since 2001 could have precipitated changes or adaptations at the program level: some WtW participants may be reaching their five-year lifetime limit on TANF; the federal WtW grants period is about to end nationwide; the implementation of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998 is further along than in 2001; and the vibrant economy of the late 1990s has cooled, affecting the labor market and the fiscal condition of states.

    This report examines the local evaluation sites with regard to three issues relating to these recent changes. First, it provides an update on the status of program operations and post-WtW plans. Second, it reports on whether and how WtW grant-funded programs have adapted to economic and policy circumstances. It also provides some indicators of program administrators' opinions about WtW and whether and how it affected service capacity in their communities. The information is based on follow-up telephone contacts made in the Spring of 2003 with administrators and key staff in each of the study sites, and review of updated program information provided by administrators. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fraker, Thomas M.; Levy, Dan M.; Olsen, Robert B.; Stapulonis, Rita A.
    Year: 2004

    The $3 billion Welfare-to-Work (WtW) grants program established by Congress as part of the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 provided funds to over 700 state and local grantees. Congress appropriated funds for FY1998 and FY1999, and grantees were allowed five years to spend their funds.1 The intent of the grants program, administered at the national level by the U.S. Department of Labor, was to supplement the welfare reform funds included in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grants to states, which were authorized under the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA).2 WtW funds were to support programs—especially those in high-poverty communities—to assist the least employable, most disadvantaged welfare recipients and noncustodial parents make the transition from welfare to work. (author abstract)

    The $3 billion Welfare-to-Work (WtW) grants program established by Congress as part of the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 provided funds to over 700 state and local grantees. Congress appropriated funds for FY1998 and FY1999, and grantees were allowed five years to spend their funds.1 The intent of the grants program, administered at the national level by the U.S. Department of Labor, was to supplement the welfare reform funds included in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grants to states, which were authorized under the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA).2 WtW funds were to support programs—especially those in high-poverty communities—to assist the least employable, most disadvantaged welfare recipients and noncustodial parents make the transition from welfare to work. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fraker, Thomas M.; Levy, Dan M.; Perez-Johnson, Irma; Hershey, Alan M.; Nightingale, Demetra S.; Olsen, Robert B.; Stapulonis, Rita A.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2004

    This final report presents descriptive findings from Mathematica's study of enrollees during the two years after they entered a welfare-to-work program. Most were TANF recipients with significant barriers to employment; although most were employed at some time during the study, many faced employment problems at the end of that period, and the jobs they held often left them in poverty. Whether a more comprehensive approach would produce better results is unclear, but the report presents design and implementation factors for programs to consider. (Author abstract)

    This final report presents descriptive findings from Mathematica's study of enrollees during the two years after they entered a welfare-to-work program. Most were TANF recipients with significant barriers to employment; although most were employed at some time during the study, many faced employment problems at the end of that period, and the jobs they held often left them in poverty. Whether a more comprehensive approach would produce better results is unclear, but the report presents design and implementation factors for programs to consider. (Author abstract)

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