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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Gibson, Cynthia M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    The Jobs Initiative, an eight-year demonstration, helps low-income residents find jobs that pay family-supporting wages in Denver, Milwaukee, New Orleans, Philadelphia, St. Louis, and Seattle. "Entrepreneurial intermediaries," ranging from a private foundation to a city agency, manage six sites that take a dramatically different, long-term approach emphasizing comprehensive strategies that fuel community-based work force development. They have a dual customer focus, meeting needs of supply (workers) and demand (employer) sides; identify and secure entry-level jobs offering low-income people livable wages, benefits, and opportunities for wage and career advancement; build on job-seekers' strengths and respect their talent, dignity, and self reliance, while providing support services; increase dialogue, communication, and understanding among stakeholders; provide community-based organizations with sustained support and technical assistance; stress outcomes-based management; and suggest and provoke broader systemic change leading to more effective jobs and work force development...

    The Jobs Initiative, an eight-year demonstration, helps low-income residents find jobs that pay family-supporting wages in Denver, Milwaukee, New Orleans, Philadelphia, St. Louis, and Seattle. "Entrepreneurial intermediaries," ranging from a private foundation to a city agency, manage six sites that take a dramatically different, long-term approach emphasizing comprehensive strategies that fuel community-based work force development. They have a dual customer focus, meeting needs of supply (workers) and demand (employer) sides; identify and secure entry-level jobs offering low-income people livable wages, benefits, and opportunities for wage and career advancement; build on job-seekers' strengths and respect their talent, dignity, and self reliance, while providing support services; increase dialogue, communication, and understanding among stakeholders; provide community-based organizations with sustained support and technical assistance; stress outcomes-based management; and suggest and provoke broader systemic change leading to more effective jobs and work force development programs and policies. Site results indicate that individuals placed in jobs had experienced significant hourly wage and earnings increases; more than twice as many had medical benefits; and more than half had been employed 12 months. Requirements for meeting workplace demands are employer engagement; employee retention and advancement; collaboration; and building organizational capacity. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fleischer, Wendy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    This policy brief summarizes key results and lessons learned from Casey's Jobs Initiative as well as implications for federal welfare policy. Highlighting the efforts of six workforce development intermediaries, the brief summarizes a range of programs and strategies that help low-skilled, low-income workers in urban areas to improve their employment potential over time. (author abstract)

    This policy brief summarizes key results and lessons learned from Casey's Jobs Initiative as well as implications for federal welfare policy. Highlighting the efforts of six workforce development intermediaries, the brief summarizes a range of programs and strategies that help low-skilled, low-income workers in urban areas to improve their employment potential over time. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Plastrik, Peter; Taylor, Judith C.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    In 1995, the Annie E. Casey Foundation was in the vanguard of a shift to a systems-change focus when it launched the Jobs Initiative in six metropolitan areas—Denver, Milwaukee, New Orleans, Philadelphia, St. Louis, and Seattle. “We hoped in the long run to influence how low-income, young-adult job-seekers could create better connections to regional labor markets on a sustainable basis,” explains Bob Giloth, program manager for the Jobs Initiative. “That meant changing the system’s behavior.”

    The foundation believed that several critical ingredients had to come together at the local level to mount systemic reform: first, a local intermediary well-positioned within the regional civic infrastructure, and second, that intermediary would have to have the funds and capacity to conduct research, assemble powerful coalitions, and test experimental programs and policies that would guide eventual changes in the system. In particular, the Casey Foundation thought that intermediaries, as they developed projects to help place low-income job seekers, would “rub” against the existing...

    In 1995, the Annie E. Casey Foundation was in the vanguard of a shift to a systems-change focus when it launched the Jobs Initiative in six metropolitan areas—Denver, Milwaukee, New Orleans, Philadelphia, St. Louis, and Seattle. “We hoped in the long run to influence how low-income, young-adult job-seekers could create better connections to regional labor markets on a sustainable basis,” explains Bob Giloth, program manager for the Jobs Initiative. “That meant changing the system’s behavior.”

    The foundation believed that several critical ingredients had to come together at the local level to mount systemic reform: first, a local intermediary well-positioned within the regional civic infrastructure, and second, that intermediary would have to have the funds and capacity to conduct research, assemble powerful coalitions, and test experimental programs and policies that would guide eventual changes in the system. In particular, the Casey Foundation thought that intermediaries, as they developed projects to help place low-income job seekers, would “rub” against the existing system, identify critical issues to be addressed, and, based on what they were learning, develop long-term strategies to reform systems. One such project that the foundation encouraged intermediaries to undertake was the creation of a Jobs Policy Network, an effort to bring together actors in the system to identify and advocate for changes. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Mueller, Elizabeth; Schwartz, Alex
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    This report explores a few examples of workforce development strategies and systems reforms implemented as part of the Casey Foundation’s Jobs Initiative. Through case studies from Seattle to New Orleans, the report illustrates workforce programs, partnerships and policies that are working, and how to navigate some common challenges in pushing for reform. (Author abstract)

    This report explores a few examples of workforce development strategies and systems reforms implemented as part of the Casey Foundation’s Jobs Initiative. Through case studies from Seattle to New Orleans, the report illustrates workforce programs, partnerships and policies that are working, and how to navigate some common challenges in pushing for reform. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ciurea, Michelle; Blain, Alexandra; DeMarco, Donna; Mills, Gregory
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    This report presents the findings from the second year of the process study associated with the national evaluation of the Assets for Independence Demonstration, a federal program that provides funding to individual development account (IDA) projects nationwide. The demonstration was established in 1998 through congressional enactment of the Assets for Independence Act (AFIA).

    This report describes the experiences of six AFIA projects in developing and implementing their IDA initiatives. The report contains (1) an overview of the Assets for Independence Demonstration program and the congressionally mandated national evaluation, (2) case studies of each of the six projects visited in 2002, and (3) a cross-site assessment of promising practices and other lessons learned.(author summary)

    This report presents the findings from the second year of the process study associated with the national evaluation of the Assets for Independence Demonstration, a federal program that provides funding to individual development account (IDA) projects nationwide. The demonstration was established in 1998 through congressional enactment of the Assets for Independence Act (AFIA).

    This report describes the experiences of six AFIA projects in developing and implementing their IDA initiatives. The report contains (1) an overview of the Assets for Independence Demonstration program and the congressionally mandated national evaluation, (2) case studies of each of the six projects visited in 2002, and (3) a cross-site assessment of promising practices and other lessons learned.(author summary)

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