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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Fein, David J. ; Beecroft, Erik; Blomquist, John D.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1994

    As in the current debate over the direction of national welfare reform, much of the inspiration for the 1988 Family Support Act (FSA) -- the last major reform -- was provided by a series of state demonstrations operating under federal waiver authority. Ohio’s Transitions to Independence Demonstration was one of the most comprehensive of the pre-1988 FSA waiver initiatives authorized by the Reagan Administration’s Low Income Advisory Board. Transitions to Independence consisted of three separate interventions, each directed to the needs of a different subpopulation of recipients of Aid to Dependent Children (ADC), as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) is known in Ohio. (author abstract)

    As in the current debate over the direction of national welfare reform, much of the inspiration for the 1988 Family Support Act (FSA) -- the last major reform -- was provided by a series of state demonstrations operating under federal waiver authority. Ohio’s Transitions to Independence Demonstration was one of the most comprehensive of the pre-1988 FSA waiver initiatives authorized by the Reagan Administration’s Low Income Advisory Board. Transitions to Independence consisted of three separate interventions, each directed to the needs of a different subpopulation of recipients of Aid to Dependent Children (ADC), as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) is known in Ohio. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bloom, Howard
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    This paper examines issues and options for the design of a major non-experimental study to measure the impacts of a large-scale, saturation-level demonstration program to promote employment among residents of selected public housing developments. The program, Jobs-Plus, is being launched by the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and The Rockefeller Foundation. [An updated, full list of the Jobs-Plus funding partners is provided at the front of this paper.] Because Jobs-Plus will be a comprehensive community initiative, available to all residents of the several public housing developments where it is implemented, the program cannot be evaluated using a randomized experiment, the now-standard method for measuring the impacts of employment and training programs. However, because community-wide initiatives are becoming an increasingly important component of social policy, it is essential to develop methods for determining their success. It is the purpose of this paper, therefore, to explore...

    This paper examines issues and options for the design of a major non-experimental study to measure the impacts of a large-scale, saturation-level demonstration program to promote employment among residents of selected public housing developments. The program, Jobs-Plus, is being launched by the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and The Rockefeller Foundation. [An updated, full list of the Jobs-Plus funding partners is provided at the front of this paper.] Because Jobs-Plus will be a comprehensive community initiative, available to all residents of the several public housing developments where it is implemented, the program cannot be evaluated using a randomized experiment, the now-standard method for measuring the impacts of employment and training programs. However, because community-wide initiatives are becoming an increasingly important component of social policy, it is essential to develop methods for determining their success. It is the purpose of this paper, therefore, to explore possibilities for doing so. (author abstract)

    Other resources on the Jobs-Plus project are available here.

  • Individual Author: Tompkins, Arnold R.
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1996

    Ohio has established itself as a state with a strong desire to move from a system of public assistance that focuses on the issuance of benefits to a system of support that rewards people for obtaining employment and achieving self-sufficiency.

    To that end, the state embarked last year on a comprehensive welfare reform initiative that promotes independence, dignity, sound families, and the value of personal responsibility. At its core is Ohio House Bill 167, signed into law on August 16, 1995, by Gov. George V. Voinovich (R), which supports families by removing the barriers they may face as they move from welfare to independence. Our welfare initiative, OhioFirst, represents a movement toward a total integration of our state programs. We want to provide our low-income citizens with a comprehensive system that enables them to move from welfare to work and from low-skill jobs to higher-paying jobs.

    The time is right for...

    Ohio has established itself as a state with a strong desire to move from a system of public assistance that focuses on the issuance of benefits to a system of support that rewards people for obtaining employment and achieving self-sufficiency.

    To that end, the state embarked last year on a comprehensive welfare reform initiative that promotes independence, dignity, sound families, and the value of personal responsibility. At its core is Ohio House Bill 167, signed into law on August 16, 1995, by Gov. George V. Voinovich (R), which supports families by removing the barriers they may face as they move from welfare to independence. Our welfare initiative, OhioFirst, represents a movement toward a total integration of our state programs. We want to provide our low-income citizens with a comprehensive system that enables them to move from welfare to work and from low-skill jobs to higher-paying jobs.

    The time is right for change. In 1995, the average annual unemployment rate in Ohio fell to its lowest level in more than two decades. For the third consecutive year, Ohio led the nation in Site Selection magazine's tracking of new facilities and plant expansion. Our welfare reform effort must unite our citizens who are seeking jobs with employers who are in search of workers. By doing so, we will move people off welfare and provide a skilled workforce to meet the needs of our employers. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Bos, Johannes; Fellerath, Veronica
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1997

    This is the fifth and final report from a multi-year evaluation of Ohio’s Learning, Earning, and Parenting (LEAP) Program. Developed and operated by the Ohio Department of Human Services (ODHS), LEAP is a statewide initiative that employs financial incentives in an attempt to increase school enrollment and attendance among pregnant teenagers and custodial teen parents on welfare (almost all of them are women). LEAP, which began operating in 1989, requires these teens to stay in school and attend regularly or, if they have dropped out, to return to school or enter a program to prepare for the General Educational Development (GED), or high school equivalency, test. The program thereby strives to increase the proportion of teens who graduate from high school or receive a GED, find jobs, and ultimately achieve self-sufficiency. These longer-term goals are important because, even though teen parents make up fewer than 10 percent of all Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) case heads, families started by women who first gave birth as teenagers account for approximately 50...

    This is the fifth and final report from a multi-year evaluation of Ohio’s Learning, Earning, and Parenting (LEAP) Program. Developed and operated by the Ohio Department of Human Services (ODHS), LEAP is a statewide initiative that employs financial incentives in an attempt to increase school enrollment and attendance among pregnant teenagers and custodial teen parents on welfare (almost all of them are women). LEAP, which began operating in 1989, requires these teens to stay in school and attend regularly or, if they have dropped out, to return to school or enter a program to prepare for the General Educational Development (GED), or high school equivalency, test. The program thereby strives to increase the proportion of teens who graduate from high school or receive a GED, find jobs, and ultimately achieve self-sufficiency. These longer-term goals are important because, even though teen parents make up fewer than 10 percent of all Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) case heads, families started by women who first gave birth as teenagers account for approximately 50 percent of all long-term AFDC recipients.

    During the period of this study (the rules have recently been modified), teens who met LEAP’s requirements had their welfare checks increased — $62 for school enrollment and an additional $62 each month they attended school regularly — and teens who did not (without an acceptable reason) had $62 deducted from their welfare grant every month until they complied with program rules. Those who exceeded the allowed number of total absences in a month but not the allowed number of unexcused absences qualified for neither a bonus nor a “sanction” (as such grant reductions are called). Teens could be temporarily exempted from LEAP’s requirements for medical reasons, to care for an infant, or if child care or transportation was unavailable. Teens were no longer subject to LEAP’s requirements when they reached the age of 20, left AFDC, or received a high school diploma or a GED. During 1992 — approximately the midpoint in the period covered by this report — a teen living on her own with one child (the most common situation) was eligible for a monthly AFDC grant of $274. Thus, a bonus raised her grant to $336 and a sanction reduced it to $212. If she went from being sanctioned to receiving a bonus, she would experience a 58 percent increase in her welfare grant. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Doolittle, Fred; Lynn, Suzanne
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1998

    Parents’ Fair Share (PFS) research on child support enforcement has several goals. First, it seeks to provide insights into the interaction between local child support enforcement systems and noncustodial parents whose children are on welfare. The approach taken in this report is to analyze what happened when the seven sites in the PFS Demonstration sought to identify low-income, unemployed noncustodial parents appropriate for PFS and refer them to the program. The report carries this story up to the point of referral of appropriate noncustodial parents to the program. Later reports in the project will continue the story, examining the implementation of PFS’s enhanced child support enforcement for noncustodial parents referred to the program and estimating program impacts on payment of child support and other key outcomes. (author abstract)

    Parents’ Fair Share (PFS) research on child support enforcement has several goals. First, it seeks to provide insights into the interaction between local child support enforcement systems and noncustodial parents whose children are on welfare. The approach taken in this report is to analyze what happened when the seven sites in the PFS Demonstration sought to identify low-income, unemployed noncustodial parents appropriate for PFS and refer them to the program. The report carries this story up to the point of referral of appropriate noncustodial parents to the program. Later reports in the project will continue the story, examining the implementation of PFS’s enhanced child support enforcement for noncustodial parents referred to the program and estimating program impacts on payment of child support and other key outcomes. (author abstract)

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