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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Kimberlin, Sara; Tach, Laura; Wimer, Christopher
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    To address the housing affordability crisis for low-income Americans, we argue for a refundable renter’s tax credit. The proposed credit would be delivered through the tax code, reach a broad segment of renters, and target those with high housing cost burdens. We simulate the effects of the credit using Current Population Survey data. The credit would reach nearly 60 percent of poor renters and more than 70 percent of renters facing severe housing cost burdens, the credit amount averaging $2,059. Among recipients, the credit reduces the poverty rate by 12.4 percentage points and the deep poverty rate by 8.8 percentage points. For those who remain poor, it reduces the poverty gap by nearly a third. The annual cost is $24.1 billion. (Author abstract)

    To address the housing affordability crisis for low-income Americans, we argue for a refundable renter’s tax credit. The proposed credit would be delivered through the tax code, reach a broad segment of renters, and target those with high housing cost burdens. We simulate the effects of the credit using Current Population Survey data. The credit would reach nearly 60 percent of poor renters and more than 70 percent of renters facing severe housing cost burdens, the credit amount averaging $2,059. Among recipients, the credit reduces the poverty rate by 12.4 percentage points and the deep poverty rate by 8.8 percentage points. For those who remain poor, it reduces the poverty gap by nearly a third. The annual cost is $24.1 billion. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Helms, Veronica E.; Steffen, Barry L.; Rudd, Elizabeth C.; Sperling, Jon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the National Center for Health Statistics agreed in 2011 to link administrative records for individuals receiving housing assistance from HUD with records from the National Health Interview Survey. This report uses the linked data for 2006 through 2012 to present nationally representative estimates of demographic characteristics, health diagnoses and conditions, and health care access and utilization for HUD-assisted children ages 0–17. To provide context, similar estimates are provided for two other relevant subgroups: children residing in unassisted renter households with incomes below the federal poverty line and all children in the U.S. population. The report presents raw prevalence estimates to reflect actual conditions for each subgroup, and does not make statistical adjustments for age or other factors to support cross-group comparison of health conditions for similar individuals. Results demonstrate that assisted children suffer disproportionately from serious health conditions. (Author abstract)

     

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the National Center for Health Statistics agreed in 2011 to link administrative records for individuals receiving housing assistance from HUD with records from the National Health Interview Survey. This report uses the linked data for 2006 through 2012 to present nationally representative estimates of demographic characteristics, health diagnoses and conditions, and health care access and utilization for HUD-assisted children ages 0–17. To provide context, similar estimates are provided for two other relevant subgroups: children residing in unassisted renter households with incomes below the federal poverty line and all children in the U.S. population. The report presents raw prevalence estimates to reflect actual conditions for each subgroup, and does not make statistical adjustments for age or other factors to support cross-group comparison of health conditions for similar individuals. Results demonstrate that assisted children suffer disproportionately from serious health conditions. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Woolverton, Maria; Bradley, M.C.; Gabel, George; Melz, Heidi
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). Too often, programs are prematurely evaluated without a planning phase to build a program’s evaluation capacity. However, there is growing consensus that prior to summative evaluation programs should undergo an intermediate step, referred to as “evaluation tollgates,” to determine whether programs are well-implemented and truly ready for rigorous evaluation. This session provided examples from two federal initiatives that used evaluation tollgates to build evidence in child welfare. Maria Woolverton (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session. (Author introduction)

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). Too often, programs are prematurely evaluated without a planning phase to build a program’s evaluation capacity. However, there is growing consensus that prior to summative evaluation programs should undergo an intermediate step, referred to as “evaluation tollgates,” to determine whether programs are well-implemented and truly ready for rigorous evaluation. This session provided examples from two federal initiatives that used evaluation tollgates to build evidence in child welfare. Maria Woolverton (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Gillespie, Sarah; Hanson, Devlin; Cunningham, Mary; Pergamit, Michael
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    A few years ago, Denver’s Crime Prevention and Control Commission (CPCC) recognized that there was a population of “frequent users” - individuals who cycle in and out of jail – who they believed were chronically homeless and suffered from mental health and substance abuse problems. The CPCC did a data match pulling homeless system data, healthcare utilization data, and criminal justice data together for 250 frequent users to see how these individuals touched other systems. They found that in Denver, 250 homeless “frequent users” spent 14,000 nights a year in jail and interacted frequently with other systems, such as detox and emergency care, which combined cost the city $7.3 million per year. To end this cycle, Denver decided to implement a supportive housing model because evidence shows that supportive housing is effective for chronically homeless adults and that the cost of the program can be offset by its benefits. But programs like this cost money; in this case, $8.6 million in funding came from the city’s first social impact bond—a way for investors to finance social change...

    A few years ago, Denver’s Crime Prevention and Control Commission (CPCC) recognized that there was a population of “frequent users” - individuals who cycle in and out of jail – who they believed were chronically homeless and suffered from mental health and substance abuse problems. The CPCC did a data match pulling homeless system data, healthcare utilization data, and criminal justice data together for 250 frequent users to see how these individuals touched other systems. They found that in Denver, 250 homeless “frequent users” spent 14,000 nights a year in jail and interacted frequently with other systems, such as detox and emergency care, which combined cost the city $7.3 million per year. To end this cycle, Denver decided to implement a supportive housing model because evidence shows that supportive housing is effective for chronically homeless adults and that the cost of the program can be offset by its benefits. But programs like this cost money; in this case, $8.6 million in funding came from the city’s first social impact bond—a way for investors to finance social change and get their money back if the project is a success. For Denver’s program, success will be measured over the next three years in improved housing stability and fewer jail stays for the target population. In addition, a larger evaluation is looking at how this intervention impacts the populations interactions with the homelessness system and the healthcare system in Denver. Together this evaluation will provide an understanding of how supportive housing affects costs in multiple sectors and will aid policymakers in making good funding decisions. Our evaluation of the program’s first 18 months found that the program is meeting early targets: participants are getting housing and staying housed. The final results of this study will help inform policy makers in and outside of Denver about the effectiveness of supportive housing in reducing the costs to multiple sectors, and enable informed decisions about potential program expansion in Denver and program adoption outside of Denver. (Excerpt from author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Ports, Katie A.; Rostad, Whitney L.; Luo, Feijun; Putnam, Michelle; Zurick, Elizabeth
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Housing instability is a risk factor for child abuse and neglect (CAN). Thus, policies that increase availability of affordable housing may reduce CAN rates. The Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program is the largest affordable housing policy initiative in the country. This study used fixed-effects models to estimate the relationship between LIHTC units and county-level CAN reports in Georgia from 2005 to 2015, controlling for county demographic characteristics. One-way fixed-effects models (including only county fixed-effects) demonstrated significant negative associations between number of LIHTC units and substantiated cases of CAN and total reports of sexual abuse. In two-way fixed-effects models (including county and year fixed-effects), LIHTC units were not associated with any of the outcomes. The findings are subject to limitations, including voluntary provision of CAN data, suppressed data for counties with <10 CAN cases, and no assessment of the quality of LIHTC neighborhood. LIHTC may be a promising prevention strategy, but more research is needed. (Author...

    Housing instability is a risk factor for child abuse and neglect (CAN). Thus, policies that increase availability of affordable housing may reduce CAN rates. The Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program is the largest affordable housing policy initiative in the country. This study used fixed-effects models to estimate the relationship between LIHTC units and county-level CAN reports in Georgia from 2005 to 2015, controlling for county demographic characteristics. One-way fixed-effects models (including only county fixed-effects) demonstrated significant negative associations between number of LIHTC units and substantiated cases of CAN and total reports of sexual abuse. In two-way fixed-effects models (including county and year fixed-effects), LIHTC units were not associated with any of the outcomes. The findings are subject to limitations, including voluntary provision of CAN data, suppressed data for counties with <10 CAN cases, and no assessment of the quality of LIHTC neighborhood. LIHTC may be a promising prevention strategy, but more research is needed. (Author abstract)

     

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