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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Mitra-Majumdar, Mayookha; Fudge, Keith; Ramakrishnan, Kriti
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    Transitional youth are young people ages 16 to 24 who leave foster care without being adopted or reunited with their biological families and/or who are involved in the juvenile justice system, where they may be in detention or subject to terms of probation. With childhoods often marked by trauma and a lack of stability, transitional youth face notoriously poor outcomes across many areas of life. Pay for success (PFS) may provide an opportunity to address some of the challenges faced by transitional youth and the difficulties in serving them. To further explore this opportunity, the Urban Institute initiated a Community of Practice, a collaborative of researchers, practitioners, and local government officials that came together to discuss the most pressing challenges facing youth aging out of foster care and/or involved in the juvenile justice system and the potential for PFS to fund programs that address these challenges. This brief summarizes insights drawn from Community of Practice conversations and provides recommendations for local governments, service providers, and other...

    Transitional youth are young people ages 16 to 24 who leave foster care without being adopted or reunited with their biological families and/or who are involved in the juvenile justice system, where they may be in detention or subject to terms of probation. With childhoods often marked by trauma and a lack of stability, transitional youth face notoriously poor outcomes across many areas of life. Pay for success (PFS) may provide an opportunity to address some of the challenges faced by transitional youth and the difficulties in serving them. To further explore this opportunity, the Urban Institute initiated a Community of Practice, a collaborative of researchers, practitioners, and local government officials that came together to discuss the most pressing challenges facing youth aging out of foster care and/or involved in the juvenile justice system and the potential for PFS to fund programs that address these challenges. This brief summarizes insights drawn from Community of Practice conversations and provides recommendations for local governments, service providers, and other partners considering PFS as a tool for financing interventions serving transitional youth. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cramer, Lindsey; Lynch, Mathew; Goff, Margaret; Esthappan, Sino; Reginal, Travis; Leitson, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    This report documents evaluation findings of NYC Justice Corps, a workforce readiness and recidivism reduction program for justice-involved youth, and describes the strengths and challenges as perceived by program staff, participants, and stakeholders. The evaluation highlights what Justice Corps providers—and similar programs—might learn as they work to integrate the goals of education, employment, and cognitive and psychosocial development into program services and activities for justice-involved youth. The authors conclude by identifying actionable recommendations for future programming for youth in NYC, including providing services to at-risk youth and their families to help them connect with their communities and provide stability, building partnerships with local organizations and service providers to overcome barriers to engagement, and providing structured aftercare services such as mentoring or support groups. (Author abstract)

    This report documents evaluation findings of NYC Justice Corps, a workforce readiness and recidivism reduction program for justice-involved youth, and describes the strengths and challenges as perceived by program staff, participants, and stakeholders. The evaluation highlights what Justice Corps providers—and similar programs—might learn as they work to integrate the goals of education, employment, and cognitive and psychosocial development into program services and activities for justice-involved youth. The authors conclude by identifying actionable recommendations for future programming for youth in NYC, including providing services to at-risk youth and their families to help them connect with their communities and provide stability, building partnerships with local organizations and service providers to overcome barriers to engagement, and providing structured aftercare services such as mentoring or support groups. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schretzman, Maryanne; Hendra, Richard; Martens, Andy; Pecaut, Chris
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    While data analytics presents new opportunities to test programs for efficacy and efficiencies, they also highlight a need for improved datasets and underscore the importance of research-practitioner partnerships. This session presented experimental research findings from studies in New York City and the state of Illinois that have used new methodologies and unique data sets to link administrative data across agencies, and the value of using predictive analytics to forecast future social outcomes. This panel, moderated by Maryanne Schretzman (NYC Center for Innovation through Data Intelligence), also discussed issues involved in linking administrative data. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    While data analytics presents new opportunities to test programs for efficacy and efficiencies, they also highlight a need for improved datasets and underscore the importance of research-practitioner partnerships. This session presented experimental research findings from studies in New York City and the state of Illinois that have used new methodologies and unique data sets to link administrative data across agencies, and the value of using predictive analytics to forecast future social outcomes. This panel, moderated by Maryanne Schretzman (NYC Center for Innovation through Data Intelligence), also discussed issues involved in linking administrative data. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Carter, Clarence H.; Collins, Grant; Holzer, Harry; Bloom, Dan; Zielewski, Erica; Redcross, Cindy
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). This plenary discussed evidence from two large-scale evaluations of subsidized employment programs focusing on a range of hard-to-serve clients, including noncustodial parents, re-entering populations, low-income adults, and other populations. The discussion of these findings, placed into context with prior evidence from previous research, served as a platform to discuss how to move hard-to-employ individuals, like those who were formerly incarcerated or noncustodial parents, into employment and economic self-sufficiency. Erica Zielewski (Office of Management and Budget) moderated this session. Clarence H. Carter (Administration for Children and Families), Harry Holzer (Georgetown University), and Grant Collins (Fedcap) served as discussants. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). This plenary discussed evidence from two large-scale evaluations of subsidized employment programs focusing on a range of hard-to-serve clients, including noncustodial parents, re-entering populations, low-income adults, and other populations. The discussion of these findings, placed into context with prior evidence from previous research, served as a platform to discuss how to move hard-to-employ individuals, like those who were formerly incarcerated or noncustodial parents, into employment and economic self-sufficiency. Erica Zielewski (Office of Management and Budget) moderated this session. Clarence H. Carter (Administration for Children and Families), Harry Holzer (Georgetown University), and Grant Collins (Fedcap) served as discussants. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Bellotti, Jeanne; Sattar, Samina; Gould-Werth, Alix; Berk, Jillian; Gutierrez, Ivette; Stein, Jillian; Betesh, Hannah; Ochoa, Lindsay; Wiegand, Andrew
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    To help individuals successfully reenter society after time in jail, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) awarded $10 million in grants to 20 local workforce development boards (LWDBs) in June 2015 for the Linking to Employment Activities PreRelease (LEAP) initiative. Central to the LEAP initiative was creating jail-based American Job Centers (AJCs) with direct linkages to community-based AJCs. A complex array of factors including jail and local community characteristics influenced the development and operations of jail-based AJCs as well as the experiences and outcomes of participants (Figure ES.1). The overarching goals were to increase participants’ work readiness at the time of release, increase employment after release, and reduce recidivism; additional goals for the pilot initiative included demonstrating that corrections and workforce agencies could effectively collaborate to provide pre-release services, generate lessons learned around promising strategies and common challenges that could inform future efforts; and identify ways for grantees to sustain the jail-based AJCs...

    To help individuals successfully reenter society after time in jail, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) awarded $10 million in grants to 20 local workforce development boards (LWDBs) in June 2015 for the Linking to Employment Activities PreRelease (LEAP) initiative. Central to the LEAP initiative was creating jail-based American Job Centers (AJCs) with direct linkages to community-based AJCs. A complex array of factors including jail and local community characteristics influenced the development and operations of jail-based AJCs as well as the experiences and outcomes of participants (Figure ES.1). The overarching goals were to increase participants’ work readiness at the time of release, increase employment after release, and reduce recidivism; additional goals for the pilot initiative included demonstrating that corrections and workforce agencies could effectively collaborate to provide pre-release services, generate lessons learned around promising strategies and common challenges that could inform future efforts; and identify ways for grantees to sustain the jail-based AJCs when the DOL-funded grant ended. The grants covered 9 months of planning and 15 months of service delivery, with many grantees receiving up to a one-year no-cost extension to finish spending down remaining grant resources. Grantees were geographically diverse, located in 13 states across 5 DOL regions, and involved a total of 22 county jails.

    Workforce development, corrections, and other partners, as well as participants, identified many successes along with significant challenges and promising strategies to address them. The qualitative evidence collected through this implementation evaluation suggests that introducing new services, partnerships, and ways of thinking about reentry hold promise for lasting effects on the workforce and corrections systems in some sites. The experiences of the LEAP grantees highlight important lessons learned and some areas for continued refinement or potential replication in similar or different contexts. Although this implementation evaluation cannot make causal claims, the evidence suggests that it is possible to use jail-based AJCs to link participants to post-release services and that this may be a promising approach to support returning individuals in successful reentry. (Edited author executive summary)

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