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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Johnson, Melissa ; Spiker, Katie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Apprenticeship and other forms of work-based learning are important tools for helping workers acquire skills employers need. To reach the most workers and businesses, more work needs to be done to diversify the apprenticeship pipeline to include more women, low-wage workers, and parents of young children.

    Underrepresented workers without adequate industry experience often need pre-employment or pre-apprenticeship training before they reach the skill level necessary to enter work-based learning programs. But, training alone may not be sufficient to ensure success. Pre-apprenticeship programs that provide both training and access to child care can offer an important on-ramp to an apprenticeship pathway for a broad range of workers. Once in an apprenticeship, child care continues to be an important support for ensuring participant success since starting wages are lower than those apprentices can expect to make once they’ve completed their program.

    This brief discusses the significant roles affordable child care and pre-work-based learning training like pre-...

    Apprenticeship and other forms of work-based learning are important tools for helping workers acquire skills employers need. To reach the most workers and businesses, more work needs to be done to diversify the apprenticeship pipeline to include more women, low-wage workers, and parents of young children.

    Underrepresented workers without adequate industry experience often need pre-employment or pre-apprenticeship training before they reach the skill level necessary to enter work-based learning programs. But, training alone may not be sufficient to ensure success. Pre-apprenticeship programs that provide both training and access to child care can offer an important on-ramp to an apprenticeship pathway for a broad range of workers. Once in an apprenticeship, child care continues to be an important support for ensuring participant success since starting wages are lower than those apprentices can expect to make once they’ve completed their program.

    This brief discusses the significant roles affordable child care and pre-work-based learning training like pre-apprenticeship have in expanding access to and success in work-based learning programs. The report highlights the best practices for offering child care during and after pre-apprenticeship programs from Moore Community House’s Mississippi Women in Construction program and offers federal and state policy recommendations to make these supports available to more workers across the country. (Author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Anand, Priyanka; Sevak, Purvi
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    We explore the role of workplace accommodations in reducing employment barriers and improving the employment of people with disabilities. We do so using data from the 2015 Survey of Disability and Employment on people with disabilities who applied for vocational rehabilitation services in three states. The results show that at least one third of nonworking people with disabilities reported employment barriers that could be addressed by workplace accommodations, such as lack of transportation and an inaccessible workplace. We also find that receiving certain types of workplace accommodations, such as help with transportation, flexible work schedules, or a personal care attendant, is positively correlated with being employed at the time of the survey. Finally, people who are in poor health or have physical disabilities were more likely to perceive workplace inaccessibility as a barrier but less likely to have received accommodations in their current or most recent job. This suggests that people with these characteristics may be good candidates to target for greater access to...

    We explore the role of workplace accommodations in reducing employment barriers and improving the employment of people with disabilities. We do so using data from the 2015 Survey of Disability and Employment on people with disabilities who applied for vocational rehabilitation services in three states. The results show that at least one third of nonworking people with disabilities reported employment barriers that could be addressed by workplace accommodations, such as lack of transportation and an inaccessible workplace. We also find that receiving certain types of workplace accommodations, such as help with transportation, flexible work schedules, or a personal care attendant, is positively correlated with being employed at the time of the survey. Finally, people who are in poor health or have physical disabilities were more likely to perceive workplace inaccessibility as a barrier but less likely to have received accommodations in their current or most recent job. This suggests that people with these characteristics may be good candidates to target for greater access to workplace accommodations. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Anderson, Theresa; McDonnell, Rachel Pleasants; Soricone, Lisa
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    This presentation describes Accelerating Opportunity (AO), a multi-state career pathways initiative designed to provide a more streamlined path for adults with low basic skills to move from integrated adult basic education and skills attainment to stackable credentials with labor market value.  The presentation includes some evaluation findings as well as discussion of partnerships the involved colleges have leveraged.

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    This presentation describes Accelerating Opportunity (AO), a multi-state career pathways initiative designed to provide a more streamlined path for adults with low basic skills to move from integrated adult basic education and skills attainment to stackable credentials with labor market value.  The presentation includes some evaluation findings as well as discussion of partnerships the involved colleges have leveraged.

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

  • Individual Author: Berman, Jacqueline; Coffee-Borden, Brandon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (the Recovery Act) used various strategies to redress unemployment challenges experienced by disadvantaged youth. The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) in the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) received $1.2 billion for youth training and employment services.  ETA allocated about $17.8 million of these funds to Indian and Native American (INA) youth through the INA Supplemental Youth Services Program.  INA grantees were encouraged to use these funds to provide employment experiences to youth in summer 2009 and summer 2010.  INA grantees responded by building on existing summer youth employment programs to extend services to additional youth, including older youth, and create new program components as appropriate and needed.

    This report describes the context in which programs for the INA Summer Youth Employment Initiative were created and provides a detailed discussion of how grantees used their Recovery Act funds to implement programs to serve youth in their communities.  The analysis is...

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (the Recovery Act) used various strategies to redress unemployment challenges experienced by disadvantaged youth. The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) in the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) received $1.2 billion for youth training and employment services.  ETA allocated about $17.8 million of these funds to Indian and Native American (INA) youth through the INA Supplemental Youth Services Program.  INA grantees were encouraged to use these funds to provide employment experiences to youth in summer 2009 and summer 2010.  INA grantees responded by building on existing summer youth employment programs to extend services to additional youth, including older youth, and create new program components as appropriate and needed.

    This report describes the context in which programs for the INA Summer Youth Employment Initiative were created and provides a detailed discussion of how grantees used their Recovery Act funds to implement programs to serve youth in their communities.  The analysis is based on INA grantees’ performance measure data and qualitative data collected during site visits to a purposive sample of five diverse grantees in five states.  This report also highlights key findings and innovations grantees made to better serve youth. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Welker, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    Across Mississippi thousands of adults work hard each day to support their families and the communities in which they live. The determination and commitment of these adults is one of the state’s greatest assets. However, many of these adults, particularly those without postsecondary experience, work in low-wage jobs without opportunities for advancement. More than 348,000 working-age adults in Mississippi have no formal education beyond high school, and almost 75 percent of Mississippi’s working-age adults do not have a postsecondary degree. Connecting adults to postsecondary education and training prepares the state’s residents and puts more Mississippians on a path to economic security.

    Moving adults into postsecondary education ensures that the state’s workforce is prepared to meet the demands of Mississippi employers. Occupations for workers with an associate degree are projected to grow by 19 percent from 2008 to 2018, a rate greater than any other educational grouping. As the need for workers with education beyond high school grows, Mississippi is at risk of having...

    Across Mississippi thousands of adults work hard each day to support their families and the communities in which they live. The determination and commitment of these adults is one of the state’s greatest assets. However, many of these adults, particularly those without postsecondary experience, work in low-wage jobs without opportunities for advancement. More than 348,000 working-age adults in Mississippi have no formal education beyond high school, and almost 75 percent of Mississippi’s working-age adults do not have a postsecondary degree. Connecting adults to postsecondary education and training prepares the state’s residents and puts more Mississippians on a path to economic security.

    Moving adults into postsecondary education ensures that the state’s workforce is prepared to meet the demands of Mississippi employers. Occupations for workers with an associate degree are projected to grow by 19 percent from 2008 to 2018, a rate greater than any other educational grouping. As the need for workers with education beyond high school grows, Mississippi is at risk of having too few workers with necessary skills and, as a result, lagging in economic competitiveness…

    This report uses data and analysis to further describe the wide range of Mississippians that stand to benefit from increased education and skills. It also proposes solutions for ensuring all groups- from low-skill adults, to recent high school graduates, to working adults looking to enhance skills- benefit from postsecondary education and workforce training and are better prepared to meet the demands of employers and find quality, family-sustaining jobs across Mississippi. (author introduction)

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