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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Goesling, Brian; Lee, Joanne; Wood, Robert G.; Zief, Susan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This report presents evidence on the longer-term impacts of an adapted version of the Reducing the Risk teen pregnancy prevention curriculum in rural Kentucky. Although rural counties have the highest teen birth rates in the United States, teen pregnancy prevention practitioners and researchers have developed and tested relatively few programs for youth in rural areas. To add to the research on effective pregnancy prevention approaches for youth in rural areas, the Administration for Children and Families within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services funded a rigorous evaluation of an adapted, eight-hour version of Reducing the Risk in 13 high schools in a primarily rural area of central and southwestern Kentucky. The program was delivered by trained staff from two local health departments in Kentucky with federal grant funding from the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP). (Author abstract)

     

    This report presents evidence on the longer-term impacts of an adapted version of the Reducing the Risk teen pregnancy prevention curriculum in rural Kentucky. Although rural counties have the highest teen birth rates in the United States, teen pregnancy prevention practitioners and researchers have developed and tested relatively few programs for youth in rural areas. To add to the research on effective pregnancy prevention approaches for youth in rural areas, the Administration for Children and Families within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services funded a rigorous evaluation of an adapted, eight-hour version of Reducing the Risk in 13 high schools in a primarily rural area of central and southwestern Kentucky. The program was delivered by trained staff from two local health departments in Kentucky with federal grant funding from the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP). (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Mattingly, Marybeth J.; Schaefer, Andrew; Gagnon, Douglas J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Like many rural communities across the United States, Southwestern Minnesota (hereafter SW Minnesota; see Box 1) has an aging population, evidenced by a growing share of seniors and a declining share of children and young adults, particularly among the non-Hispanic white population. As the population ages, it is also becoming more diverse, as racial-ethnic minority population is far younger, on average, than the non-Hispanic white population and contains a disproportionate share of children and young adults. Much of the growth in diversity is driven by an expanding population of immigrants. These residents, typically in their young working-age years, often establish themselves in SW Minnesota and go on to have families of their own. Research on the rural outmigration of the young and working non-Hispanic white population indicates that it is often the most promising youth and young adults who leave and seek opportunities elsewhere. At the same time, the aging population puts pressure on scarce resources, and the immigrant populations often face challenges including low education...

    Like many rural communities across the United States, Southwestern Minnesota (hereafter SW Minnesota; see Box 1) has an aging population, evidenced by a growing share of seniors and a declining share of children and young adults, particularly among the non-Hispanic white population. As the population ages, it is also becoming more diverse, as racial-ethnic minority population is far younger, on average, than the non-Hispanic white population and contains a disproportionate share of children and young adults. Much of the growth in diversity is driven by an expanding population of immigrants. These residents, typically in their young working-age years, often establish themselves in SW Minnesota and go on to have families of their own. Research on the rural outmigration of the young and working non-Hispanic white population indicates that it is often the most promising youth and young adults who leave and seek opportunities elsewhere. At the same time, the aging population puts pressure on scarce resources, and the immigrant populations often face challenges including low education, lack of English language proficiency, and the inability to garner work authorization. It is against this demographic backdrop that we explore challenges and opportunities for youth in SW Minnesota. We analyze data on various demographic, economic, educational, and social indicators to gain a better understanding of the circumstances youth face and the opportunity available in SW Minnesota. Wherever possible, we compare conditions in SW Minnesota to the state as a whole and to the entire nation. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Meit, Michael; Hafford, Carol; Fromknecht, Catharine; Phillips, Emily; Miesfeld, Noelle; Nadel, Tori
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report summarizes:

    • the findings from a review of the literature on tribal research oversight,
    • approaches to conducting evaluations in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities, and
    • strategies and models used to implement programs similar to the Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) 2.0 Program.

    Additionally, this report describes how the findings from the literature review have informed the Tribal HPOG 2.0 evaluation design. The Tribal HPOG 2.0 program supports demonstration projects that provide TANF recipients and other low-income individuals with the opportunity to obtain education and training for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. NORC at the University of Chicago is leading a comprehensive implementation and outcome evaluation of the Tribal HPOG 2.0 Program. (Author abstract) 

    This report summarizes:

    • the findings from a review of the literature on tribal research oversight,
    • approaches to conducting evaluations in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities, and
    • strategies and models used to implement programs similar to the Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) 2.0 Program.

    Additionally, this report describes how the findings from the literature review have informed the Tribal HPOG 2.0 evaluation design. The Tribal HPOG 2.0 program supports demonstration projects that provide TANF recipients and other low-income individuals with the opportunity to obtain education and training for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. NORC at the University of Chicago is leading a comprehensive implementation and outcome evaluation of the Tribal HPOG 2.0 Program. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Meit, Michael; Hafford, Carol; Fromknecht, Catharine; Miesfeld, Noelle; Nadel, Tori; Phillips, Emily
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This practice brief summarizes how the Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) 2.0 evaluation team applied the findings from the their literature review and the values of the Roadmap for Collaborative and Effective Evaluation in Tribal Communities to inform the Tribal HPOG 2.0 evaluation approach. (Author abstract)

    This practice brief summarizes how the Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) 2.0 evaluation team applied the findings from the their literature review and the values of the Roadmap for Collaborative and Effective Evaluation in Tribal Communities to inform the Tribal HPOG 2.0 evaluation approach. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schaefer, Andrew; Mattingly, Marybeth J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    In recent years, researchers have documented the changing demographics of rural areas, with a specific focus on changes in racial-ethnic composition and immigration patterns, particularly the increased migration of Hispanics to rural places. In spite of this attention to the changing demographics of rural America, surprisingly little is known about how rural immigrants compare to both their urban peers and native-born counterparts. In this brief we use American Community Survey (ACS) five-year estimates to document demographic and economic characteristics of the immigrant and native-born populations in the United States by metropolitan status. We focus on a wide range of demographic and economic indicators that relate to immigrants’ ability to assimilate and thrive in rural America. Our analysis finds that rural immigrants are different than their rural native-born and urban immigrant counterparts on a host of demographic characteristics, including age, education, and family structure. Rural immigrants also differ from urban immigrants with regard to when they arrived in the...

    In recent years, researchers have documented the changing demographics of rural areas, with a specific focus on changes in racial-ethnic composition and immigration patterns, particularly the increased migration of Hispanics to rural places. In spite of this attention to the changing demographics of rural America, surprisingly little is known about how rural immigrants compare to both their urban peers and native-born counterparts. In this brief we use American Community Survey (ACS) five-year estimates to document demographic and economic characteristics of the immigrant and native-born populations in the United States by metropolitan status. We focus on a wide range of demographic and economic indicators that relate to immigrants’ ability to assimilate and thrive in rural America. Our analysis finds that rural immigrants are different than their rural native-born and urban immigrant counterparts on a host of demographic characteristics, including age, education, and family structure. Rural immigrants also differ from urban immigrants with regard to when they arrived in the United States and where from. In terms of economic characteristics, rural immigrants have relatively low family income and high poverty rates, even among those currently working and those who work full time. (Author abstract)

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