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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Benton, Amanda; Dunton, Lauren; Khadduri, Jill; Walton, Douglas
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The Homeless Families Research Briefs project uses data from a large randomized controlled trial, the Family Options Study, to answer questions that are of interest to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This panel included presentations on three aspects of homeless families that may help HHS ensure that the agency’s programs and policies are used to assist families that have experienced homelessness in becoming self-sufficient. Amanda Benton (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The Homeless Families Research Briefs project uses data from a large randomized controlled trial, the Family Options Study, to answer questions that are of interest to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This panel included presentations on three aspects of homeless families that may help HHS ensure that the agency’s programs and policies are used to assist families that have experienced homelessness in becoming self-sufficient. Amanda Benton (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Curtis, Marah A.; Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    We exploit an exogenous health shock--the birth of a child with a severe health condition--to investigate the causal effect of a life shock on homelessness. Using survey data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing study that have been augmented with information from hospital medical records, we find that the health shock increases the likelihood of homelessness three years later, particularly in cities with high housing costs. Homelessness is defined using both a traditional measure and a more contemporary measure that includes residential instability and doubling up without paying rent. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. They also add to a growing body of evidence that housing markets are an important contributor to homelessness and suggest that homelessness is a problem not easily addressed by existing public support programs. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a...

    We exploit an exogenous health shock--the birth of a child with a severe health condition--to investigate the causal effect of a life shock on homelessness. Using survey data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing study that have been augmented with information from hospital medical records, we find that the health shock increases the likelihood of homelessness three years later, particularly in cities with high housing costs. Homelessness is defined using both a traditional measure and a more contemporary measure that includes residential instability and doubling up without paying rent. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. They also add to a growing body of evidence that housing markets are an important contributor to homelessness and suggest that homelessness is a problem not easily addressed by existing public support programs. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a working paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research.

  • Individual Author: Tsemberis, Sam; Kent, Douglas; Respress, Christy
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    Pathways Housing First provides access to housing, support, and treatment services to clients having the most complex needs—persons who have been homeless for at least 5 years and have both a psychiatric disability and substance dependency. In a 2-year Housing and Urban Development-funded demonstration project in Washington, DC, in 2007 and 2008, we observed promising outcomes in housing retention and reductions in psychiatric symptoms, alcohol use, and demand for intensive support services. The program is designed to be fiscally self-sustaining through extant public disability benefits for housing, treatment, and support services. This approach shows strong support for first providing a permanently supported housing solution for chronically homeless and severely disabled individuals in need of housing and treatment of co-occurring disorders. (author abstract)

    Pathways Housing First provides access to housing, support, and treatment services to clients having the most complex needs—persons who have been homeless for at least 5 years and have both a psychiatric disability and substance dependency. In a 2-year Housing and Urban Development-funded demonstration project in Washington, DC, in 2007 and 2008, we observed promising outcomes in housing retention and reductions in psychiatric symptoms, alcohol use, and demand for intensive support services. The program is designed to be fiscally self-sustaining through extant public disability benefits for housing, treatment, and support services. This approach shows strong support for first providing a permanently supported housing solution for chronically homeless and severely disabled individuals in need of housing and treatment of co-occurring disorders. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Massachusetts Housing and Shelter Alliance
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    As a result of mounting evidence from around the country that housing first is cost effective and decreases the incidence of chronic homelessness, the Massachusetts Legislature passed line-item 4406-3010 in the FY07 state budget to fund a statewide pilot housing first program for 130 chronically homeless individuals. The state allocated $600,000 to MHSA through the Department of Transitional Assistance (DTA) to operate the program, known as Home and Healthy for Good (HHG). This resource is to be used to fund a portion of the service or housing components for program participants, with the expectation that federal or other state resources would be leveraged to finance additional needed service or facilities funds. (Author introduction)

    As a result of mounting evidence from around the country that housing first is cost effective and decreases the incidence of chronic homelessness, the Massachusetts Legislature passed line-item 4406-3010 in the FY07 state budget to fund a statewide pilot housing first program for 130 chronically homeless individuals. The state allocated $600,000 to MHSA through the Department of Transitional Assistance (DTA) to operate the program, known as Home and Healthy for Good (HHG). This resource is to be used to fund a portion of the service or housing components for program participants, with the expectation that federal or other state resources would be leveraged to finance additional needed service or facilities funds. (Author introduction)

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