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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Cerf, Benjamin; Leach, Mark A.; Mitchell, Josh; Shattuck, Rachel M.
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes how the great recession of 2007-2010 has exacerbated the economic instability of many U.S. families, and how it has renewed Congressional interest in evaluating programs like SNAP, WIC, and TANF.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes how the great recession of 2007-2010 has exacerbated the economic instability of many U.S. families, and how it has renewed Congressional interest in evaluating programs like SNAP, WIC, and TANF.

  • Individual Author: Cunnyngham, Karen E.
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    This report – part of an annual series – presents estimates of the percentage of eligible persons, by State, who participated in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) during an average month in fiscal year 2011 and in the 2 previous fiscal years. SNAP eligibility criteria include, but are not limited to, income guidelines and either United States citizenship or legal immigrant status with, for most, at least five years’ residency. 

    This report also presents estimates of State participation rates for eligible “working poor” individuals (persons in households with earnings) over the same period. Although SNAP provides an important support for working families, the working poor have participated for a number of years at rates that are substantially below those for all eligible persons. The addition of State-by-State information on participation among the working poor enables a comparison of these rates to the overall participation rates. Nationally, the SNAP participation rate among all eligible persons was 79 percent in fiscal year 2011. The participation rate...

    This report – part of an annual series – presents estimates of the percentage of eligible persons, by State, who participated in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) during an average month in fiscal year 2011 and in the 2 previous fiscal years. SNAP eligibility criteria include, but are not limited to, income guidelines and either United States citizenship or legal immigrant status with, for most, at least five years’ residency. 

    This report also presents estimates of State participation rates for eligible “working poor” individuals (persons in households with earnings) over the same period. Although SNAP provides an important support for working families, the working poor have participated for a number of years at rates that are substantially below those for all eligible persons. The addition of State-by-State information on participation among the working poor enables a comparison of these rates to the overall participation rates. Nationally, the SNAP participation rate among all eligible persons was 79 percent in fiscal year 2011. The participation rate for eligible working poor individuals was significantly lower statistically, at 67 percent. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    Most families and individuals who meet the program’s income guidelines are eligible for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP — formerly the Food Stamp Program).  The size of a family’s SNAP benefit is based on its income and certain expenses.  This paper provides a short summary of SNAP eligibility and benefit calculation rules. (author abstract)

    Most families and individuals who meet the program’s income guidelines are eligible for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP — formerly the Food Stamp Program).  The size of a family’s SNAP benefit is based on its income and certain expenses.  This paper provides a short summary of SNAP eligibility and benefit calculation rules. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Black, Rachel
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    At a time when 47 million people are receiving SNAP and state budgets continue to suffer and produce cuts to staff that administer public assistance, understanding the impact of policy choices becomes increasingly consequential. As policy makers continue to evaluate actions to either simplify or reform asset limits or make them more burdensome, this research demonstrates that, far from removing safeguards to program integrity and opening supports to increased caseloads, removing asset limits increases efficiency, reduces errors, and can even reduce costs. Perhaps more importantly, it sends the signal that saving, investing in your family’s wellbeing, should be encouraged, and that in times of hardship, families can access the short-term benefits they need without being penalized for taking responsible actions. This brief reviews the legislative history of asset limits within SNAP, examine the most recent evidence on the impact of asset limits on the wellbeing of participants and administrative efficiency and identify implications this evidence has for current federal and state...

    At a time when 47 million people are receiving SNAP and state budgets continue to suffer and produce cuts to staff that administer public assistance, understanding the impact of policy choices becomes increasingly consequential. As policy makers continue to evaluate actions to either simplify or reform asset limits or make them more burdensome, this research demonstrates that, far from removing safeguards to program integrity and opening supports to increased caseloads, removing asset limits increases efficiency, reduces errors, and can even reduce costs. Perhaps more importantly, it sends the signal that saving, investing in your family’s wellbeing, should be encouraged, and that in times of hardship, families can access the short-term benefits they need without being penalized for taking responsible actions. This brief reviews the legislative history of asset limits within SNAP, examine the most recent evidence on the impact of asset limits on the wellbeing of participants and administrative efficiency and identify implications this evidence has for current federal and state policy discussions. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ettinger de Cuba, Stephanie; Harker, Laura; Weiss, Ingrid; Scully, Kate; Chilton, Mariana; Coleman, Sharon
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    New Children’s HealthWatch research shows that increases in income that trigger loss of nutrition assistance benefits can leave young children in poor health and without enough food to eat. These data suggest that young children from families that have been cut off from SNAP or had their SNAP benefits reduced when their income exceeds eligibility limits are significantly more likely to be in poor health, be at risk for developmental delays and experience child food insecurity than those whose families currently receive benefits. Evidence has shown SNAP to be a powerful medicine for the treatment of food insecurity. Creative, real-world policy solutions that provide for upward mobility and security will help ensure that families who increase their income are still able to afford everyday needs for their children while making strides toward economic independence. (author abstract)

    New Children’s HealthWatch research shows that increases in income that trigger loss of nutrition assistance benefits can leave young children in poor health and without enough food to eat. These data suggest that young children from families that have been cut off from SNAP or had their SNAP benefits reduced when their income exceeds eligibility limits are significantly more likely to be in poor health, be at risk for developmental delays and experience child food insecurity than those whose families currently receive benefits. Evidence has shown SNAP to be a powerful medicine for the treatment of food insecurity. Creative, real-world policy solutions that provide for upward mobility and security will help ensure that families who increase their income are still able to afford everyday needs for their children while making strides toward economic independence. (author abstract)

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