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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Benton, Amanda; Dunton, Lauren; Khadduri, Jill; Walton, Douglas
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The Homeless Families Research Briefs project uses data from a large randomized controlled trial, the Family Options Study, to answer questions that are of interest to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This panel included presentations on three aspects of homeless families that may help HHS ensure that the agency’s programs and policies are used to assist families that have experienced homelessness in becoming self-sufficient. Amanda Benton (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The Homeless Families Research Briefs project uses data from a large randomized controlled trial, the Family Options Study, to answer questions that are of interest to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This panel included presentations on three aspects of homeless families that may help HHS ensure that the agency’s programs and policies are used to assist families that have experienced homelessness in becoming self-sufficient. Amanda Benton (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Meyer, Bruce D.; Mittag, Nikolas
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    We examine the consequences of underreporting of transfer programs in household survey data for several prototypical analyses of low-income populations. We focus on the Current Population Survey (CPS), the source of official poverty and inequality statistics, but provide evidence that our qualitative conclusions are likely to apply to other surveys. We link administrative data for food stamps, TANF, General Assistance, and subsidized housing from New York State to the CPS at the individual level. Program receipt in the CPS is missed for over one-third of housing assistance recipients, 40 percent of food stamp recipients, and 60 percent of TANF and General Assistance recipients. Dollars of benefits are also undercounted for reporting recipients, particularly for TANF, General Assistance and housing assistance. We find that the survey data sharply understate the income of poor households, as conjectured in past work by one of the authors. Underreporting in the survey data also greatly understates the effects of anti-poverty programs and changes our understanding of program...

    We examine the consequences of underreporting of transfer programs in household survey data for several prototypical analyses of low-income populations. We focus on the Current Population Survey (CPS), the source of official poverty and inequality statistics, but provide evidence that our qualitative conclusions are likely to apply to other surveys. We link administrative data for food stamps, TANF, General Assistance, and subsidized housing from New York State to the CPS at the individual level. Program receipt in the CPS is missed for over one-third of housing assistance recipients, 40 percent of food stamp recipients, and 60 percent of TANF and General Assistance recipients. Dollars of benefits are also undercounted for reporting recipients, particularly for TANF, General Assistance and housing assistance. We find that the survey data sharply understate the income of poor households, as conjectured in past work by one of the authors. Underreporting in the survey data also greatly understates the effects of anti-poverty programs and changes our understanding of program targeting, often making it seem that welfare programs are less targeted to both the very poorest and middle income households than they are. Using the combined data rather than survey data alone, the poverty reducing effect of all programs together is nearly doubled while the effect of housing assistance is tripled. We also re-examine the coverage of the safety net, specifically the share of people without work or program receipt. Using the administrative measures of program receipt rather than the survey ones often reduces the share of single mothers falling through the safety net by one-half or more. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sogar, Christina
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    This presentation describes results of a study in which English-speaking, SSI-receiving parents in child-only TANF cases in Alameda and San Francisco counties were interviewed to determine their experiences receiving TANF, SSI, and other support sources; their health status and use of medical care; and their parenting practices and involvement with child protective services.

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    This presentation describes results of a study in which English-speaking, SSI-receiving parents in child-only TANF cases in Alameda and San Francisco counties were interviewed to determine their experiences receiving TANF, SSI, and other support sources; their health status and use of medical care; and their parenting practices and involvement with child protective services.

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

  • Individual Author: Farrell, Mary; Walter, Johanna
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Policymakers and program operators have long worked to understand how state and federal programs can best serve low-income families in which one parent or more has a disability. The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, administered by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), serves low-income families, some of whom include individuals who have disabilities or other work limitations. The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program, administered by the Social Security Administration (SSA), serves low-income individuals who are aged, blind, or disabled. Though these two programs have overlapping goals of supporting low-income people with disabilities, while encouraging self-sufficiency and employment, they have key differences in approach, structure, and definitions that pose challenges to coordination.

    In order to understand how best to serve TANF recipients with disabilities, ACF contracted with MDRC and its partners, MEF Associates and TransCen, to conduct the TANF/SSI Disability Transition Project (TSDTP). This first report of the TSDTP...

    Policymakers and program operators have long worked to understand how state and federal programs can best serve low-income families in which one parent or more has a disability. The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, administered by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), serves low-income families, some of whom include individuals who have disabilities or other work limitations. The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program, administered by the Social Security Administration (SSA), serves low-income individuals who are aged, blind, or disabled. Though these two programs have overlapping goals of supporting low-income people with disabilities, while encouraging self-sufficiency and employment, they have key differences in approach, structure, and definitions that pose challenges to coordination.

    In order to understand how best to serve TANF recipients with disabilities, ACF contracted with MDRC and its partners, MEF Associates and TransCen, to conduct the TANF/SSI Disability Transition Project (TSDTP). This first report of the TSDTP describes how TANF agencies work with participants who have a disability and how they interact with local SSA offices. It is based on field assessments in California, Florida, Michigan, and Minnesota. The report also presents findings from analyses of merged TANF and SSI data, documenting the extent to which adult TANF recipients are connected with the SSI system and how they contribute to the overall dynamics of caseload changes in SSI. Data from these separate programs have not been analyzed together before now, so the report offers unique and important analytical insight. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Farrell, Mary; Baird, Peter; Barden, Bret; Fishman, Mike; Pardoe, Rachel
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    This report describes three pilot projects designed to improve some aspect of TANF services for clients with disabilities, including those who may apply for SSI. Pilots took place in Ramsey County, MN, Los Angeles County, CA, and Muskegon County, MI.

    • Ramsey County, Minnesota, developed a pilot program to increase employment among TANF recipients with work limitations and disabilities. It gathered into the same location mental health services, health care services, and employment services following the Integrated Placement and Support (IPS) model. The results offer promise that IPS, which has been shown to be effective among individuals with severe mental illness, might be adapted effectively for TANF recipients with disabilities.
    • Los Angeles County, California, aimed to improve the quality of SSI applications submitted by TANF recipients in order to increase the approval rate at the initial level. Local Social Security Administration (SSA) and Disability Determination Services (DDS) staff members provided training to the county’s SSI advocates, gave feedback...

    This report describes three pilot projects designed to improve some aspect of TANF services for clients with disabilities, including those who may apply for SSI. Pilots took place in Ramsey County, MN, Los Angeles County, CA, and Muskegon County, MI.

    • Ramsey County, Minnesota, developed a pilot program to increase employment among TANF recipients with work limitations and disabilities. It gathered into the same location mental health services, health care services, and employment services following the Integrated Placement and Support (IPS) model. The results offer promise that IPS, which has been shown to be effective among individuals with severe mental illness, might be adapted effectively for TANF recipients with disabilities.
    • Los Angeles County, California, aimed to improve the quality of SSI applications submitted by TANF recipients in order to increase the approval rate at the initial level. Local Social Security Administration (SSA) and Disability Determination Services (DDS) staff members provided training to the county’s SSI advocates, gave feedback on the completeness and quality of submitted SSI applications, and established local liaisons.  The pilot project improved coordination among agencies, though the percentage of SSI applications awarded benefits at the initial level remained about the same.
    • Muskegon County, Michigan, developed an intervention designed to better identify TANF recipients with disabilities and to improve the employment services offered to TANF clients deemed to have disabilities but to be able to work. The program’s staff used materials drawn from the SSI/SSDI Outreach, Access, and Recovery (SOAR) program to develop medical and case evidence. Staff members were trained to use motivational interviewing techniques to reduce participants’ barriers to work participation.

    (author abstract)

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