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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Mullins, Brett; Rider, Mark; Sjoquist, David; Wallace, Sally
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    This brief focuses on trends in participation of Georgia residents in the SNAP and TANF programs over a 14-year period to better understand the dynamics of these programs. In the next section, a brief summary of these two programs is provided. The third section shows participation trends in these two programs in Georgia. (Author abstract)

    This brief focuses on trends in participation of Georgia residents in the SNAP and TANF programs over a 14-year period to better understand the dynamics of these programs. In the next section, a brief summary of these two programs is provided. The third section shows participation trends in these two programs in Georgia. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Nelson, Sandi; Zedlewski, Sheila; Edin, Kathryn; Koball, Heather; Pomper, Kate; Roberts, Tracy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    This study shows that a large, computerized survey instrument (the National Survey of America's Families) can serve as an excellent vehicle for identifying a target sample for further research (very poor families with children not currently working or receiving cash government assistance) and that qualitative information can be obtained effectively through telephone interviews. The interviews reveal that 56 percent of the families interviewed currently fit all study income criteria; 13 percent had a change in status since their NSAF interview; and 31 percent provided different information during the qualitative interview than they provided during the NSAF interview. The rate of survey discrepancies is actually lower than that found in previous studies that have attempted to verify income data in government surveys. The interviews suggest ways to improve the collection of income data in quantitative survey instruments. (author abstract) 

    This study shows that a large, computerized survey instrument (the National Survey of America's Families) can serve as an excellent vehicle for identifying a target sample for further research (very poor families with children not currently working or receiving cash government assistance) and that qualitative information can be obtained effectively through telephone interviews. The interviews reveal that 56 percent of the families interviewed currently fit all study income criteria; 13 percent had a change in status since their NSAF interview; and 31 percent provided different information during the qualitative interview than they provided during the NSAF interview. The rate of survey discrepancies is actually lower than that found in previous studies that have attempted to verify income data in government surveys. The interviews suggest ways to improve the collection of income data in quantitative survey instruments. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Zedlewski, Sheila R.; Brauner, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    At all levels of income, former welfare recipients were more likely to leave the Food Stamp program than families that had not been on welfare, according to this brief based on the 1997 National Survey of America's Families. Among the poorest of the poor, those at 50 percent of the federal poverty line and below, former welfare families stopped using food stamps at twice the rate of nonwelfare families. About two-thirds of families that left the Food Stamp program appeared to be eligible based on their incomes. The most common reasons families gave for leaving the Food Stamp Program were increased earnings/a new job, or administrative problems and hassles. (Author abstract)

    At all levels of income, former welfare recipients were more likely to leave the Food Stamp program than families that had not been on welfare, according to this brief based on the 1997 National Survey of America's Families. Among the poorest of the poor, those at 50 percent of the federal poverty line and below, former welfare families stopped using food stamps at twice the rate of nonwelfare families. About two-thirds of families that left the Food Stamp program appeared to be eligible based on their incomes. The most common reasons families gave for leaving the Food Stamp Program were increased earnings/a new job, or administrative problems and hassles. (Author abstract)