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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Bandy, Dewey
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    For many years tribes in California have struggled with drastically underfunded housing programs that have left them unable to meet even basic housing needs. Additionally, tribes have faced significant obstacles in trying to compete with mainstream affordable housing developers for funding awards in California’s low income housing tax credit allocation system. Considerable cross-community work to bring tribes and housing program administrators together, however, led to the creation of California’s first tribal set-aside within the LIHTC program, and the first award to an Indian tribe in California in the thirty-year history of the state’s LIHTC program. The story behind the establishment of this new set-aside offers important lessons about how alliances can be formed to begin to breakdown longstanding barriers of isolation and inaccessibility. (author abstract) 

    For many years tribes in California have struggled with drastically underfunded housing programs that have left them unable to meet even basic housing needs. Additionally, tribes have faced significant obstacles in trying to compete with mainstream affordable housing developers for funding awards in California’s low income housing tax credit allocation system. Considerable cross-community work to bring tribes and housing program administrators together, however, led to the creation of California’s first tribal set-aside within the LIHTC program, and the first award to an Indian tribe in California in the thirty-year history of the state’s LIHTC program. The story behind the establishment of this new set-aside offers important lessons about how alliances can be formed to begin to breakdown longstanding barriers of isolation and inaccessibility. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Cunningham, Mary; Gearing, Maeve; Pergamit, Michael; Zhang, Simone; McDaniel, Marla; Howell, Brent
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Supportive Housing is an intervention that combines affordable housing with intensive wrap around services. The intervention has been successful with hard to serve populations, such as chronically homeless adults. Communities are testing the efficacy of supportive housing with high-need child welfare families to learn if providing supportive housing helps improve outcomes for children and families, spend taxpayer dollars more wisely, and lead to long-lasting systems change and service integration. The Partnership to Demonstrate the Effectiveness of Supportive Housing for Families in the Child Welfare System is a federal demonstration investigating these important questions. This brief describes the purpose and design of the demonstration and profiles the five program sites. (author abstract)

    Supportive Housing is an intervention that combines affordable housing with intensive wrap around services. The intervention has been successful with hard to serve populations, such as chronically homeless adults. Communities are testing the efficacy of supportive housing with high-need child welfare families to learn if providing supportive housing helps improve outcomes for children and families, spend taxpayer dollars more wisely, and lead to long-lasting systems change and service integration. The Partnership to Demonstrate the Effectiveness of Supportive Housing for Families in the Child Welfare System is a federal demonstration investigating these important questions. This brief describes the purpose and design of the demonstration and profiles the five program sites. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Carlson, Deven; Haveman, Robert; Kaplan, Tom; Wolfe, Barbara
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    In this paper we estimate the effect of housing voucher receipt on the composition of recipient households and the quality of the neighborhoods in which recipient households reside. Drawing on a dataset that contains extensive information on a large and diverse panel of low-income families for up to 5 years following voucher receipt, we isolate the effects of voucher receipt using propensity score matching techniques together with regression adjustment. Full-sample results show voucher receipt to have little effect on neighborhood quality in the short-term, but some positive long-term effects. We also find that voucher receipt is tied to a higher probability of change in household composition in the year of voucher receipt, but greater stability in subsequent years. Our large sample allows us to explore differential responses of geographic and socioeconomic subgroups. Our findings have several implications for both research and policy. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a...

    In this paper we estimate the effect of housing voucher receipt on the composition of recipient households and the quality of the neighborhoods in which recipient households reside. Drawing on a dataset that contains extensive information on a large and diverse panel of low-income families for up to 5 years following voucher receipt, we isolate the effects of voucher receipt using propensity score matching techniques together with regression adjustment. Full-sample results show voucher receipt to have little effect on neighborhood quality in the short-term, but some positive long-term effects. We also find that voucher receipt is tied to a higher probability of change in household composition in the year of voucher receipt, but greater stability in subsequent years. Our large sample allows us to explore differential responses of geographic and socioeconomic subgroups. Our findings have several implications for both research and policy. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a working paper published by the University of Wisconsin.

  • Individual Author: Carlson, Deven; Haveman, Robert; Kaplan, Thomas; Wolfe, Barbara
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    The federal Section 8 housing program provides eligible low-income families with an income-conditioned voucher that can be used to lease privately owned, affordable rental housing units. This paper extends prior research on the effectiveness of housing support programs in several ways. We use a quasi-experimental, propensity score matching research design, and examine the effect of housing voucher receipt on neighborhood quality, earnings, and work effort. Results are presented for a wide variety of demographic groups for up to five years following voucher receipt. The analysis employs a unique longitudinal dataset that was created by combining administrative records maintained by the State of Wisconsin with census block group data. The results of our propensity score matching procedure show voucher receipt to have no effect on neighborhood quality in the short-term, but positive long-term effects. Furthermore, the results indicate that on average voucher receipt causes lower earnings in the initial years following receipt, but that these negative earnings effects dissipate over...

    The federal Section 8 housing program provides eligible low-income families with an income-conditioned voucher that can be used to lease privately owned, affordable rental housing units. This paper extends prior research on the effectiveness of housing support programs in several ways. We use a quasi-experimental, propensity score matching research design, and examine the effect of housing voucher receipt on neighborhood quality, earnings, and work effort. Results are presented for a wide variety of demographic groups for up to five years following voucher receipt. The analysis employs a unique longitudinal dataset that was created by combining administrative records maintained by the State of Wisconsin with census block group data. The results of our propensity score matching procedure show voucher receipt to have no effect on neighborhood quality in the short-term, but positive long-term effects. Furthermore, the results indicate that on average voucher receipt causes lower earnings in the initial years following receipt, but that these negative earnings effects dissipate over time. Finally, we find that recipient responses to voucher receipt differ substantially across demographic subgroups. (author abstract)

    An article was published based on this working paper in 2011.

  • Individual Author: Pistilli, Linda
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    Volume II is a qualitative study of success rates in rural areas. The purpose of this study is to explore Section 8 success rates and the factors that affect success rates in rural areas through in-depth qualitative research at five rural public housing authorities. The report is based on field work conducted between May and August, 2000. The rural study was not intended to feed into or re-validate the conclusions drawn from the larger quantitative study (Volume I report) regarding the relationships between household demographics, market tightness, and program success in metropolitan areas. Although these factors were considered, this study focused on identifying and examining the unique factors that affect voucher holders in rural areas. (author abstract)

    Volume II is a qualitative study of success rates in rural areas. The purpose of this study is to explore Section 8 success rates and the factors that affect success rates in rural areas through in-depth qualitative research at five rural public housing authorities. The report is based on field work conducted between May and August, 2000. The rural study was not intended to feed into or re-validate the conclusions drawn from the larger quantitative study (Volume I report) regarding the relationships between household demographics, market tightness, and program success in metropolitan areas. Although these factors were considered, this study focused on identifying and examining the unique factors that affect voucher holders in rural areas. (author abstract)

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