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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Shapiro, Rachel; Wood, Robert G; Knab, Jean ; Murphy, Lauren
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This brief summarizes key findings from a study of the implementation of the Teen Choice curriculum, a 12-session program that uses interactive exercises and guided discussions to deliver information to groups of 8 to 12 students on abstinence, contraception, sexually transmitted infections, and healthy relationships. With funding from a Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) grant, Inwood House—a nonprofit agency that developed the curriculum—implemented the program in New York City-area alternative schools for youth with emotional, behavioral, and academic challenges. The implementation study was conducted in conjunction with a rigorous impact study, in which students who agreed to take part in the study were randomly assigned to receive Teen Choice or their regular programming. (Author abstract)

     

    This brief summarizes key findings from a study of the implementation of the Teen Choice curriculum, a 12-session program that uses interactive exercises and guided discussions to deliver information to groups of 8 to 12 students on abstinence, contraception, sexually transmitted infections, and healthy relationships. With funding from a Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) grant, Inwood House—a nonprofit agency that developed the curriculum—implemented the program in New York City-area alternative schools for youth with emotional, behavioral, and academic challenges. The implementation study was conducted in conjunction with a rigorous impact study, in which students who agreed to take part in the study were randomly assigned to receive Teen Choice or their regular programming. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Cramer, Lindsey; Lynch, Mathew; Lipman, Micaela; Yu, Lilly; Astone, Nan Marie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This report presents the findings of an implementation and outcome evaluation of the Advocate, Intervene, Mentor (AIM) program, a court-mandated juvenile alternative-to-placement program serving probation clients ages 13 to 18 years with high criminogenic risk. The evaluation finds that AIM successfully helps participants avoid out-of-home placement1 and reduce recidivism, as well as pursue and achieve individualized goals to help reduce their risk of reoffending. (Edited author introduction)

    This report presents the findings of an implementation and outcome evaluation of the Advocate, Intervene, Mentor (AIM) program, a court-mandated juvenile alternative-to-placement program serving probation clients ages 13 to 18 years with high criminogenic risk. The evaluation finds that AIM successfully helps participants avoid out-of-home placement1 and reduce recidivism, as well as pursue and achieve individualized goals to help reduce their risk of reoffending. (Edited author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Israel, Dina; Behrmann, Rebecca; Wulfsohn, Samantha
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This brief introduces the Building Bridges and Bonds study (B3) to practitioners and stakeholders in the fatherhood field. It describes three innovative practices for Responsible Fatherhood programs. Each innovation is practical and interactive and addresses issues important to low-income fathers. The B3 team selected them for their high potential to provide useful lessons for the field. The team then collaborated with local fatherhood programs and program developers to tailor the innovations for B3. The brief is the first in a series of publications on B3, its findings, and the lessons learned. (Author introduction)

     

    This brief introduces the Building Bridges and Bonds study (B3) to practitioners and stakeholders in the fatherhood field. It describes three innovative practices for Responsible Fatherhood programs. Each innovation is practical and interactive and addresses issues important to low-income fathers. The B3 team selected them for their high potential to provide useful lessons for the field. The team then collaborated with local fatherhood programs and program developers to tailor the innovations for B3. The brief is the first in a series of publications on B3, its findings, and the lessons learned. (Author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Finegood, Eric D.; Raver, C. Cybele; DeJoseph, Meriah L.; Blair, Clancy
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Research has long acknowledged the centrality of parents’ subjective experiences in the caregiving role for the organization of parenting behaviors and family functioning. Recent scientific advances in cognitive process models and in the neurobiology of parenting indicate that parenting is shaped in part by conscious and nonconscious cognitive processes. This study extends a growing literature on neurocognitive models of parenting by exploring the extent to which attention processes in parents operate independently and interactively with intrapsychic processes, proximal interpersonal stressors, and the larger socioeconomic context to predict perceptions of parenting hassles in primarily low-income Latino/a parents of young children living in urban areas of concentrated disadvantage (N = 185). Analyses indicated that parent reports of anxiety, intimate partner violence, and perceptions of financial hardship each uniquely predicted parents’ perceptions of daily parenting hassles. Parents’ attentional bias toward threat interacted with anxiety symptoms such that parents experiencing...

    Research has long acknowledged the centrality of parents’ subjective experiences in the caregiving role for the organization of parenting behaviors and family functioning. Recent scientific advances in cognitive process models and in the neurobiology of parenting indicate that parenting is shaped in part by conscious and nonconscious cognitive processes. This study extends a growing literature on neurocognitive models of parenting by exploring the extent to which attention processes in parents operate independently and interactively with intrapsychic processes, proximal interpersonal stressors, and the larger socioeconomic context to predict perceptions of parenting hassles in primarily low-income Latino/a parents of young children living in urban areas of concentrated disadvantage (N = 185). Analyses indicated that parent reports of anxiety, intimate partner violence, and perceptions of financial hardship each uniquely predicted parents’ perceptions of daily parenting hassles. Parents’ attentional bias toward threat interacted with anxiety symptoms such that parents experiencing high levels of attention bias toward threat in combination with high levels of anxiety reported significantly more daily parenting hassles. Findings from the current study provide insight into the ways in which neurocognitive processes affect one aspect of parenting, with implications for programs and policies designed to support parenting for families in poverty. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schneider, Daniel ; Harknett, Kristen; McLanahan, Sara
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    In the United States, the Great Recession was marked by severe negative shocks to labor market conditions. In this study, we combine longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study with U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data on local area unemployment rates to examine the relationship between adverse labor market conditions and mothers’ experiences of abusive behavior between 2001 and 2010. Unemployment and economic hardship at the household level were positively related to abusive behavior. Further, rapid increases in the unemployment rate increased men’s controlling behavior toward romantic partners even after we adjust for unemployment and economic distress at the household level. We interpret these findings as demonstrating that the uncertainty and anticipatory anxiety that go along with sudden macroeconomic downturns have negative effects on relationship quality, above and beyond the effects of job loss and material hardship. (Author abstract)

    In the United States, the Great Recession was marked by severe negative shocks to labor market conditions. In this study, we combine longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study with U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data on local area unemployment rates to examine the relationship between adverse labor market conditions and mothers’ experiences of abusive behavior between 2001 and 2010. Unemployment and economic hardship at the household level were positively related to abusive behavior. Further, rapid increases in the unemployment rate increased men’s controlling behavior toward romantic partners even after we adjust for unemployment and economic distress at the household level. We interpret these findings as demonstrating that the uncertainty and anticipatory anxiety that go along with sudden macroeconomic downturns have negative effects on relationship quality, above and beyond the effects of job loss and material hardship. (Author abstract)

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