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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Meyer, Daniel ; Cancian, Maria
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    Much previous research has focused on the length of welfare spells and returns to welfare following an exit. Few quantitative studies have looked at broader indicators of the economic wellbeing of those who have exited AFDC. In this paper we use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NSLY) to trace welfare use, poverty status, and primary sources of income in the five years following an exit from welfare. We find that while there is a trend toward improved economic status over time, 40 percent of women remain poor five years after exit. Women with more advantaged family backgrounds, those with fewer children, or with more education at exit are more likely to consistently escape poverty. Median income increases over the first five years from about $10,500 to about $15,000 (1992 dollars). Own earnings are the most prevalent income source, followed by spouse’s earnings, and mean-tested transfers. (author abstract)

    Much previous research has focused on the length of welfare spells and returns to welfare following an exit. Few quantitative studies have looked at broader indicators of the economic wellbeing of those who have exited AFDC. In this paper we use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NSLY) to trace welfare use, poverty status, and primary sources of income in the five years following an exit from welfare. We find that while there is a trend toward improved economic status over time, 40 percent of women remain poor five years after exit. Women with more advantaged family backgrounds, those with fewer children, or with more education at exit are more likely to consistently escape poverty. Median income increases over the first five years from about $10,500 to about $15,000 (1992 dollars). Own earnings are the most prevalent income source, followed by spouse’s earnings, and mean-tested transfers. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cancian, Maria; Meyer, Daniel R.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    A study was conducted to examine child support orders before and after the introduction of income-sharing guidelines in Wisconsin. Income-sharing guidelines consider the incomes of both the resident and the nonresident parent and assign the nonresident parent an amount of child support based on his or her relative income. Results reveal that the guidelines have significantly decreased the extent to which higher resident-parent income is related to lower child support orders. It is demonstrated that because of the relationship between resident-parent income and other factors, a multivariate analysis is critical to this assessment. (Author abstract)

    A study was conducted to examine child support orders before and after the introduction of income-sharing guidelines in Wisconsin. Income-sharing guidelines consider the incomes of both the resident and the nonresident parent and assign the nonresident parent an amount of child support based on his or her relative income. Results reveal that the guidelines have significantly decreased the extent to which higher resident-parent income is related to lower child support orders. It is demonstrated that because of the relationship between resident-parent income and other factors, a multivariate analysis is critical to this assessment. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Olson, Christine; Rauschenbach, Barbara ; Frongillo, Edward; Kendall, Anne
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    In order to identify factors that contribute to household food insecurity in a rural county in upstate New York, we conducted two personal interviews with 193 women who were between the ages of 20 and 40 years, had less than 16 years of education, and had children living at home. Data were collected on sociodemographic characteristics, risk factors for food insecurity, food program participation, and the Radimer/Cornell hunger and food insecurity measures; in addition, each household’s food supplies were inventoried. Regression analyses and tree-based partitioning were used to identify the risk factors. The variables significantly contributing to food insecurity were being a single parent, lack of savings, larger household size, having unexpected expenses, adding $50 or more to food stamps to purchase sufficient food, and having low food expenditures. The variables contributing to low levels of household food supplies were low educational level, low food expenditures, not vegetable gardening, and not receiving free milk, eggs, and meat. (author abstract) 

    In order to identify factors that contribute to household food insecurity in a rural county in upstate New York, we conducted two personal interviews with 193 women who were between the ages of 20 and 40 years, had less than 16 years of education, and had children living at home. Data were collected on sociodemographic characteristics, risk factors for food insecurity, food program participation, and the Radimer/Cornell hunger and food insecurity measures; in addition, each household’s food supplies were inventoried. Regression analyses and tree-based partitioning were used to identify the risk factors. The variables significantly contributing to food insecurity were being a single parent, lack of savings, larger household size, having unexpected expenses, adding $50 or more to food stamps to purchase sufficient food, and having low food expenditures. The variables contributing to low levels of household food supplies were low educational level, low food expenditures, not vegetable gardening, and not receiving free milk, eggs, and meat. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Cancian, Maria ; Meyer, Daniel
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    Wisconsin is at the forefront of a national movement to require AFDC recipients to find employment. The move toward work-based welfare reform raises important questions about the job prospects, potential wages, and child care responsibilities of current recipients. To begin answering these questions, we analyzed administrative data concerning the characteristics of Wisconsin women who headed AFDC-Regular (primarily single parent) cases, which account for about 80 percent of all AFDC cases in Wisconsin.

    We first looked at changes in the state’s caseload from 1983 to 1993 to learn whether the remarkable decline in the number of AFDC recipients that took place over that period meant that those who were better prepared for work had already left the rolls. We found that, over the decade, the AFDC-Regular caseload increasingly contained recipients with low levels of education, larger families, and younger children. The percentage of those recipients who lacked a high school diploma rose from 35 to 42 percent of the total; the proportion of families with more than one child grew...

    Wisconsin is at the forefront of a national movement to require AFDC recipients to find employment. The move toward work-based welfare reform raises important questions about the job prospects, potential wages, and child care responsibilities of current recipients. To begin answering these questions, we analyzed administrative data concerning the characteristics of Wisconsin women who headed AFDC-Regular (primarily single parent) cases, which account for about 80 percent of all AFDC cases in Wisconsin.

    We first looked at changes in the state’s caseload from 1983 to 1993 to learn whether the remarkable decline in the number of AFDC recipients that took place over that period meant that those who were better prepared for work had already left the rolls. We found that, over the decade, the AFDC-Regular caseload increasingly contained recipients with low levels of education, larger families, and younger children. The percentage of those recipients who lacked a high school diploma rose from 35 to 42 percent of the total; the proportion of families with more than one child grew from 50 to 57 percent; and families with a preschool child increased from 62 to 72 percent. These figures indicate that the current caseload includes a greater proportion of individuals who face barriers to full-time work. To learn more about the nature of those barriers, we turned to a close examination of those who were recipients in December 1993, the latest date for which information was available at the time of our study. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Weinberg, Daniel H.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    Are the rich getting richer and the poor getting poorer? Historical Census Bureau statistics on income can shed some light on that debate. Although the Census Bureau has been measuring incomes for a half-century and a large number of factors have been identified as contributing to changes in inequality, the root causes are still not entirely understood. (author abstract)

    Are the rich getting richer and the poor getting poorer? Historical Census Bureau statistics on income can shed some light on that debate. Although the Census Bureau has been measuring incomes for a half-century and a large number of factors have been identified as contributing to changes in inequality, the root causes are still not entirely understood. (author abstract)

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