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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Ball, Jeff; Wellbank, Mary Ann
    Year: 2017

    This comprehensive guide to child support fills a void for information about the “Title IV-D” child support program, which impacts over one in ten adults (28 million parents) and over one quarter of the nation’s children.  In the U.S. 40% of children are born out of wedlock, and the vast majority of them are children in Title IV-D cases. One in two children will spend some of his or her minority years in a household without two parents.  While there is a plethora of topical information on state, federal, and tribal child support program websites, until now, there has been no single, definitive, layperson’s guide to the government-run child support program. Books that touch on this topic are written by divorce lawyers who look at a child support legal system from a 10,000-foot height leaving a $20,000 attorney bill. Few understand the nuances and complexities of the Title IV-D system. This system of 53,000 state and local workers throughout the country collected $28.5 billion in over 14 million cases in 2015.  This book is designed to help mothers and fathers navigate through the...

    This comprehensive guide to child support fills a void for information about the “Title IV-D” child support program, which impacts over one in ten adults (28 million parents) and over one quarter of the nation’s children.  In the U.S. 40% of children are born out of wedlock, and the vast majority of them are children in Title IV-D cases. One in two children will spend some of his or her minority years in a household without two parents.  While there is a plethora of topical information on state, federal, and tribal child support program websites, until now, there has been no single, definitive, layperson’s guide to the government-run child support program. Books that touch on this topic are written by divorce lawyers who look at a child support legal system from a 10,000-foot height leaving a $20,000 attorney bill. Few understand the nuances and complexities of the Title IV-D system. This system of 53,000 state and local workers throughout the country collected $28.5 billion in over 14 million cases in 2015.  This book is designed to help mothers and fathers navigate through the national child support system, and understand their rights, responsibilities and the laws regarding their cases. It will also serve as an excellent resource for child support professionals, family law attorneys, advocates, stakeholders, and public officials around the country who want to become more familiar with the system. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Higdon, Michael J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    Much of the law relating to child support is based on the fact that it is typically in a child's best interest to receive financial support from mothers as well as fathers. In fact, child support is essentially a form of strict liability with the justification being that the child is an innocent party, and thus, even those men who never consented to the sexual act that caused the pregnancy are nonetheless liable for the support of the resulting child. These men include males who become fathers as a result of statutory rape and also adult males who became fathers either as a result of sexual assault or having their sperm stolen and used by a woman for purposes of self-insemination. However, the courts' justification that all children are entitled to support from both biological parents has been seriously undermined by the laws regulating artificial insemination. In that context, a man only becomes the legal father of an artificially inseminated child if he affirmatively consents to fatherhood. This Article argues that it is incongruous to allow exceptions for formal sperm donors...

    Much of the law relating to child support is based on the fact that it is typically in a child's best interest to receive financial support from mothers as well as fathers. In fact, child support is essentially a form of strict liability with the justification being that the child is an innocent party, and thus, even those men who never consented to the sexual act that caused the pregnancy are nonetheless liable for the support of the resulting child. These men include males who become fathers as a result of statutory rape and also adult males who became fathers either as a result of sexual assault or having their sperm stolen and used by a woman for purposes of self-insemination. However, the courts' justification that all children are entitled to support from both biological parents has been seriously undermined by the laws regulating artificial insemination. In that context, a man only becomes the legal father of an artificially inseminated child if he affirmatively consents to fatherhood. This Article argues that it is incongruous to allow exceptions for formal sperm donors yet deny similar protections wholesale for those who, although not in the setting of a sperm bank, never consented to the use of their sperm. Accordingly, this Article proposes that courts adopt an approach similar (albeit narrower) to that used in artificial insemination cases to adjudicate child support claims against those men who were forced into fatherhood as a result of nonconsensual insemination. (Author abstract)