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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Miller, Cynthia; Bos, Johannes ; Porter, Kristin; Tseng, Fannie M.; Abe, Yasuyo
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    The Center for Employment Training (CET), headquartered in San Jose, California, gained the attention of policymakers in the early 1990s, when it proved to be the only training program in two major evaluations (one of which, JOBSTART, targeted disadvantaged youth) to produce large positive effects on participants’ employment and earnings. Such documented success is rare among employment and training programs in general, but it is especially unusual among programs serving youth.

    The Evaluation of the Center for Employment Training Replication Sites –– initiated and funded by the U.S. Department of Labor –– sought to build on this remarkable performance by testing the CET model on out-of-school youth beyond its traditional base in San Jose. This final report in a series evaluating the replication effort presents findings after four and a half years of follow-up. It shows that, even in the sites that best implemented the model, CET had no overall employment and earnings effects for youth in the program, even though it increased participants’ hours of training and receipt of...

    The Center for Employment Training (CET), headquartered in San Jose, California, gained the attention of policymakers in the early 1990s, when it proved to be the only training program in two major evaluations (one of which, JOBSTART, targeted disadvantaged youth) to produce large positive effects on participants’ employment and earnings. Such documented success is rare among employment and training programs in general, but it is especially unusual among programs serving youth.

    The Evaluation of the Center for Employment Training Replication Sites –– initiated and funded by the U.S. Department of Labor –– sought to build on this remarkable performance by testing the CET model on out-of-school youth beyond its traditional base in San Jose. This final report in a series evaluating the replication effort presents findings after four and a half years of follow-up. It shows that, even in the sites that best implemented the model, CET had no overall employment and earnings effects for youth in the program, even though it increased participants’ hours of training and receipt of credentials. (Edited author preface)

  • Individual Author: Manno, Michelle S.; Yang, Edith; Bangser, Michael
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Educational attainment and early work experience provide a crucial foundation for future success. However, many young adults are disconnected from both school and the job market. Neglecting these young people can exact a heavy toll on not only the individuals but also society as a whole, for example, through lost productivity and tax contributions, increased dependence on public assistance, and higher rates of criminal activity.

    Project Rise served 18- to 24-year-olds who lacked a high school diploma or the equivalent and had been out of school, out of work, and not in any type of education or training program for at least six months. After enrolling as part of a group (or cohort) of 25 to 30 young people, Project Rise participants were to engage in a 12-month sequence of activities centered on case management, classroom education focused mostly on preparation for a high school equivalency certificate, and a paid part-time internship that was conditional on adequate attendance in the educational component. After the internship, participants were expected to enter...

    Educational attainment and early work experience provide a crucial foundation for future success. However, many young adults are disconnected from both school and the job market. Neglecting these young people can exact a heavy toll on not only the individuals but also society as a whole, for example, through lost productivity and tax contributions, increased dependence on public assistance, and higher rates of criminal activity.

    Project Rise served 18- to 24-year-olds who lacked a high school diploma or the equivalent and had been out of school, out of work, and not in any type of education or training program for at least six months. After enrolling as part of a group (or cohort) of 25 to 30 young people, Project Rise participants were to engage in a 12-month sequence of activities centered on case management, classroom education focused mostly on preparation for a high school equivalency certificate, and a paid part-time internship that was conditional on adequate attendance in the educational component. After the internship, participants were expected to enter unsubsidized employment, postsecondary education, or both. The program was operated by three organizations in New York City; one in Newark, New Jersey; and one in Kansas City, Missouri.

    The Project Rise program operations and evaluation were funded through the federal Social Innovation Fund (SIF), a public-private partnership administered by the Corporation for National and Community Service. The Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City and the New York City Center for Economic Opportunity led this SIF project in collaboration with MDRC. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Klein Vogel, Lisa ; Bradley, M. C.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This brief discusses the capacity strategy associated with "The Framework to End Youth Homelessness: A Resource Text for Dialogue and Action," (USICH, 2013) (herafter referred to as the “Framework”) and how the strategy was implemented by YARH Phase I grantees (Figure 1). This framework expanded on the 2010 strategic plan, “Opening Doors,” which was geared toward preventing homelessness among multiple populations (USICH, 2010). The 2013 framework targets the specific challenges and needs of homeless adolescents as they transition to adulthood. It presents a data strategy, a capacity strategy, and an intervention model designed to prevent and eradicate homelessness among unaccompanied youth. The information in this brief comes from grant applications, semi-annual progress reports submitted by YARH grantees, and two-day site visits with each grantee in January – March 2015. (Edited author summary)

     

     

    This brief discusses the capacity strategy associated with "The Framework to End Youth Homelessness: A Resource Text for Dialogue and Action," (USICH, 2013) (herafter referred to as the “Framework”) and how the strategy was implemented by YARH Phase I grantees (Figure 1). This framework expanded on the 2010 strategic plan, “Opening Doors,” which was geared toward preventing homelessness among multiple populations (USICH, 2010). The 2013 framework targets the specific challenges and needs of homeless adolescents as they transition to adulthood. It presents a data strategy, a capacity strategy, and an intervention model designed to prevent and eradicate homelessness among unaccompanied youth. The information in this brief comes from grant applications, semi-annual progress reports submitted by YARH grantees, and two-day site visits with each grantee in January – March 2015. (Edited author summary)

     

     

  • Individual Author: Bangser, Michael
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    In the United States, 1.6 million young people between 18 and 24 years old are out of school (lacking either a high school degree or General Educational Development certificate) and out of work. These “disconnected” young people face significant barriers to economic opportunity and distressingly high odds of becoming involved with the criminal justice system. 

    Project Rise, a program currently operating as part of New York City's Social Innovation Fund initiative, seeks to reconnect these young people with education, work, and social support as a pathway to a brighter future. A distinctive feature of Project Rise is that participants are offered paid internships if they maintain satisfactory attendance in the program’s education component. 

    This policy brief provides early lessons from Project Rise, including that: 

    • Enrolling participants in a series of groups (or cohorts) can promote bonding among them through a combination of peer support and peer pressure.
    • Surprisingly, participants appear to value the program’s education...

    In the United States, 1.6 million young people between 18 and 24 years old are out of school (lacking either a high school degree or General Educational Development certificate) and out of work. These “disconnected” young people face significant barriers to economic opportunity and distressingly high odds of becoming involved with the criminal justice system. 

    Project Rise, a program currently operating as part of New York City's Social Innovation Fund initiative, seeks to reconnect these young people with education, work, and social support as a pathway to a brighter future. A distinctive feature of Project Rise is that participants are offered paid internships if they maintain satisfactory attendance in the program’s education component. 

    This policy brief provides early lessons from Project Rise, including that: 

    • Enrolling participants in a series of groups (or cohorts) can promote bonding among them through a combination of peer support and peer pressure.
    • Surprisingly, participants appear to value the program’s education component more than they value the offer of a part-time paid internship.
    • Given the challenges of engaging disconnected young people for the full duration of the program, it is important to respond flexibly to participants’ barriers and strengths.

    These lessons and others that will emerge from the Project Rise implementation research can inform federal, state, and local policies for disconnected young people. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Miller, Cynthia; Porter, Kristin E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    This working paper examines employment and earnings over a four-year period for a group of disadvantaged out-of-school youth who entered the Evaluation of the Center for Employment Training (CET) Replication Sites between 1995 and 1999. It assesses the importance of three key factors as barriers to employment: lack of a high school diploma, having children, and having an arrest record. The findings show that dropouts worked less than high school graduates, largely because of greater employment instability among men and because of both instability and longer spells of joblessness among women. Female dropouts had especially low employment rates and wages, and the negative effects of dropping out occurred primarily among women with children. Male dropouts did as well as high school graduates in terms of wages, although their overall job quality remained lower. For women, the results show no negative effects on employment or wages of having children at study entry. Although not measuring the effects of new births, these results suggest that any effects of early childbearing may be...

    This working paper examines employment and earnings over a four-year period for a group of disadvantaged out-of-school youth who entered the Evaluation of the Center for Employment Training (CET) Replication Sites between 1995 and 1999. It assesses the importance of three key factors as barriers to employment: lack of a high school diploma, having children, and having an arrest record. The findings show that dropouts worked less than high school graduates, largely because of greater employment instability among men and because of both instability and longer spells of joblessness among women. Female dropouts had especially low employment rates and wages, and the negative effects of dropping out occurred primarily among women with children. Male dropouts did as well as high school graduates in terms of wages, although their overall job quality remained lower. For women, the results show no negative effects on employment or wages of having children at study entry. Although not measuring the effects of new births, these results suggest that any effects of early childbearing may be short-lived. Finally, men with previous arrests worked less over the follow-up period than other men, owing entirely to longer spells of joblessness, and they earned substantially lower wages. The findings suggest that these men may have faced an increasingly difficult time finding jobs as the economy weakened. (author abstract)

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