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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2015

    SSRC Selections highlight research, evaluation reports, and other publications that inform the field about key issues in, and effective practices for, fostering economic self-sufficiency. This set of selections focuses on transitions to adulthood.

    SSRC Selections highlight research, evaluation reports, and other publications that inform the field about key issues in, and effective practices for, fostering economic self-sufficiency. This set of selections focuses on transitions to adulthood.

  • Individual Author: O'Donnell, Julie; Kirkner, Sandra L.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    Low-income urban youth of color often face challenges in their transition to early adulthood. High school out-of-school time (OST) programs that promote positive youth development may help youth to better negotiate this period. However, little research exists on the long-term impact of such programs on young adults. The authors conducted a pilot qualitative study to explore the perspectives of young adults on the effect of their participation in the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) of Greater Long Beach Youth Institute. Respondents indicated that the program positively influenced their life choices and their ability to pursue higher education and enter the workforce. The findings suggest implications for other high school OST programs. (Author abstract)

    Low-income urban youth of color often face challenges in their transition to early adulthood. High school out-of-school time (OST) programs that promote positive youth development may help youth to better negotiate this period. However, little research exists on the long-term impact of such programs on young adults. The authors conducted a pilot qualitative study to explore the perspectives of young adults on the effect of their participation in the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) of Greater Long Beach Youth Institute. Respondents indicated that the program positively influenced their life choices and their ability to pursue higher education and enter the workforce. The findings suggest implications for other high school OST programs. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kuhl, Danielle C. ; Chavez, Jorge M.; Swisher, Raymond R. ; Wilczak, Andrew
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Recent research suggests increasing heterogeneity in the transition from adolescence to early adulthood. This study considers how this heterogeneity may influence delinquency between these two developmental periods. We focus on the role of family transitions, educational attainment, and employment in predicting risk of nonviolent delinquency and substance use, as well as disparities in transitions across socioeconomic status subgroups. Data are from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health). We find that family and neighborhood advantage are negatively associated with transitions into marriage, cohabitation, and parenthood, yet positively associated with educational attainment. In addition, adolescent family and neighborhood advantage are associated with a continuation of delinquent behavior and substance use during early adulthood. In multivariate analyses, accounting for family transitions in early adulthood largely attenuates the relationship between neighborhood advantage in adolescence and delinquency in early adulthood. We conclude by...

    Recent research suggests increasing heterogeneity in the transition from adolescence to early adulthood. This study considers how this heterogeneity may influence delinquency between these two developmental periods. We focus on the role of family transitions, educational attainment, and employment in predicting risk of nonviolent delinquency and substance use, as well as disparities in transitions across socioeconomic status subgroups. Data are from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health). We find that family and neighborhood advantage are negatively associated with transitions into marriage, cohabitation, and parenthood, yet positively associated with educational attainment. In addition, adolescent family and neighborhood advantage are associated with a continuation of delinquent behavior and substance use during early adulthood. In multivariate analyses, accounting for family transitions in early adulthood largely attenuates the relationship between neighborhood advantage in adolescence and delinquency in early adulthood. We conclude by discussing the implications of our findings for developmental criminology. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Comfort, Megan
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    With the tremendous rise in the United States' incarceration rates over the last four decades, historically high numbers of young African Americans are spending their “emerging adulthood” (as theorized by Arnett) in close contact with the penitentiary. In contrast to the exploration of future possibilities facilitated by academic, military, and professional institutions geared toward people in this life stage, imprisonment typically restricts one's social, occupational, and civic opportunities during and after confinement. In this article, I draw on in-depth interviews with young men who had recently exited state prison and their intimate partners to probe the meanings of incarceration for emerging adults in the neoliberal era. This investigation invokes Merton and Barber's concept of sociological ambivalence, Blankenship's discussion of sociological thriving, and Bourdieu's notion of amor fati to analyze the paradoxically positive accounts offered by young people when describing their early experiences with the prison. I argue that these narratives must be interpreted...

    With the tremendous rise in the United States' incarceration rates over the last four decades, historically high numbers of young African Americans are spending their “emerging adulthood” (as theorized by Arnett) in close contact with the penitentiary. In contrast to the exploration of future possibilities facilitated by academic, military, and professional institutions geared toward people in this life stage, imprisonment typically restricts one's social, occupational, and civic opportunities during and after confinement. In this article, I draw on in-depth interviews with young men who had recently exited state prison and their intimate partners to probe the meanings of incarceration for emerging adults in the neoliberal era. This investigation invokes Merton and Barber's concept of sociological ambivalence, Blankenship's discussion of sociological thriving, and Bourdieu's notion of amor fati to analyze the paradoxically positive accounts offered by young people when describing their early experiences with the prison. I argue that these narratives must be interpreted in the broader context of diminished social welfare and intensified socioeconomic disadvantage that force poor people to turn to a punitive institution as a “resource” for the social goods distributed through valorized channels to their more privileged peers. This analysis invites further research by highlighting the necessity of developing a thorough understanding of the dominant role of the prison as a shaping institution at a critical juncture in the lives of those born into poverty. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Blakeslee, Jennifer
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    The support and resources embedded in social networks may be especially important for youth aging out of child welfare custody, such that foster youth support network characteristics influence the degree to which individual risk factors translate to poor outcomes during the transition from care. To examine the extent of this network influence on youth outcomes, social network analysis can be used to measure the interconnected relationships in the service network of caseworkers, foster parents and other providers, and in the personal network of biological family and community supports. By assessing these patterns of relationships, researchers can identify social network characteristics associated with particular subpopulations of foster youth who experience relatively successful or unsuccessful transition outcomes. This paper applies social network concepts and related methodology to frame foster youth transition support from a network perspective to promote the generation of network-informed hypotheses that could expand the scope of research with this important population. (...

    The support and resources embedded in social networks may be especially important for youth aging out of child welfare custody, such that foster youth support network characteristics influence the degree to which individual risk factors translate to poor outcomes during the transition from care. To examine the extent of this network influence on youth outcomes, social network analysis can be used to measure the interconnected relationships in the service network of caseworkers, foster parents and other providers, and in the personal network of biological family and community supports. By assessing these patterns of relationships, researchers can identify social network characteristics associated with particular subpopulations of foster youth who experience relatively successful or unsuccessful transition outcomes. This paper applies social network concepts and related methodology to frame foster youth transition support from a network perspective to promote the generation of network-informed hypotheses that could expand the scope of research with this important population. (Author abstract)

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